Ipomoea

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Umbrian

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Re: Ipomoea
« Reply #45 on: July 25, 2021, 08:13:20 AM »
Seed collected from last years Mahogany Midget germinated well for me and have performed well again despite the heat that is seeing off many things. They are in a position that affords some shade in the middle of the day. Will make sure I collect seed again this year David and return some to their original donor. A delightful little plant 🙏
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.

Umbrian

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Re: Ipomoea
« Reply #46 on: September 21, 2021, 09:03:55 AM »
Having been absent for some time due to trouble with my IPad I started to go through all the 'unread posts'. Unfortunately I was disturbed and had to leave it but was about to reply to some posts about Ipomea alba. Back this morning and I can no longer find the correct page.......so will post my comments here under Ipomea which seems a logical thing to do although I notice my last post under this heading was about Coreopsis🤔
Anyway.... Ipomea alba....... this year has been very disappointing and I put  it down to the extreme temperatures we have had throughout the summer.
I start my saved seeds early in the house ready for planting out as soon as night temperatures allow. I find the vines have to be quite mature before flowers start forming and eventually opening. In order to enjoy them more I put them in a pot in a different position to one used previously. The plants grew strongly and some flowering shoots appeared but before reaching any size they dried up and withered away. Finally when I had almost given up hope one flower opened....but others on the same stem keeled over and came to nothing as they approached fruition.   The position I chose this year for the plants was in a slightly hotter spot but with some shade during the hottest hours . This, coupled with the unrelenting heat we had this year from June onwards, was the reason for my disappointment I think.  My best results came when the plants were in almost permanent  light shade. Some new flowering stems are appearing now and temperatures have dropped considerably and so I am still hoping for the odd late bloom but next year they will be going back to their original position.   
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.

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Charithea

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Re: Ipomoea
« Reply #47 on: September 26, 2021, 10:53:22 AM »
Here is my Ipomoea tuberculata.  Thank you David.  It opened this morning.  It would have flowered earlier if it had not been knocked about by my cats.  Obviously it takes set backs in its stride.   My Ipomoea alba is now full of buds.  Watch this space.  Thank you all for sending me the seeds.
I garden in Cyprus, in a flat old farming field, alt. approx. 30 m asl.

David Dickinson

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Re: Ipomoea
« Reply #48 on: September 26, 2021, 02:04:34 PM »
Well done. 99.9% of my seedlings were destroyed in a hailstorm in June this year. First by being shredded by the force of the ice and then by sitting covered by ice. I think I have sent this link before. This is of a hailstorm 2 or 3 years ago. It will give you an idea of what hailstorms in Rome can be like.

https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=hailstorm+rome&docid=608055627093181678&mid=64D8BF10CD168B86DC5D64D8BF10CD168B86DC5D&view=detail&FORM=VIRE

Then the drought hit. The dryness itself a problem but also causing the blackbirds to dig ever deeper into any pots that were watered. I also have the problem of fungus gnats which eat the roots of seedlings. They can be checked by adding Hydrogen peroxide to the soil at the time of planting the seeds - something I forgot to do.

https://www.completehomemaker.com/how-to-get-rid-of-fungus-gnats-with-hydrogen-peroxide/

My sister's seed sowing effort suffers from slug and snail infestation. Using insect cages this year eliminated that problem totally. I have invested in some. Primarily to keep the blackbirds out but when I saw how fine the mesh is, I think it will keep out fungus gnats too. Preventing them from reinfesting my pots? The cages are 2ft x 1ft x 1ft and have a transparent plastic top to let light in. I don't think they will withstand Rome hail though :-(
I have a small garden in Rome, Italy. Some open soil, some concrete, some paved. Temperatures in winter occasionally down to 0C. Summer temperatures up to 40C in the shade. There are never watering restrictions but, of course, there is little natural water for much of June, July and August.

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John J

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Re: Ipomoea
« Reply #49 on: October 04, 2021, 02:16:02 PM »
As there have been some problems recently regarding posting photos, and even text, this is by way of being a test to see how prevalent it is. I chose a photo I took of the same Ipomoea tuberculata as my wife to be the test subject. Here goes.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

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John J

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Re: Ipomoea
« Reply #50 on: October 04, 2021, 02:20:32 PM »
Seems to be one of those annoying intermittent glitches. If it continues we'll have to seek further advice as to possible ways of combatting it. I have received one suggestion that maybe could be investigated.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

David Dickinson

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Re: Ipomoea
« Reply #51 on: October 04, 2021, 05:17:10 PM »
I will try again now with my only ipomoea success story this year. First without photo.
I have a small garden in Rome, Italy. Some open soil, some concrete, some paved. Temperatures in winter occasionally down to 0C. Summer temperatures up to 40C in the shade. There are never watering restrictions but, of course, there is little natural water for much of June, July and August.

David Dickinson

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Re: Ipomoea
« Reply #52 on: October 04, 2021, 05:18:49 PM »
So far, so good. Text fine. Next try may not arrive as I intend to attach a photo. Fingers crossed.
I have a small garden in Rome, Italy. Some open soil, some concrete, some paved. Temperatures in winter occasionally down to 0C. Summer temperatures up to 40C in the shade. There are never watering restrictions but, of course, there is little natural water for much of June, July and August.

David Dickinson

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Re: Ipomoea
« Reply #53 on: October 04, 2021, 05:23:59 PM »
here is my Ipomoea alba with five flowers open simultaneously on a single plant last night. My only ipomoea success this year. All others died except one specimen of Ipomoea lutea. But that as yet to produce a single flower :-(
I have a small garden in Rome, Italy. Some open soil, some concrete, some paved. Temperatures in winter occasionally down to 0C. Summer temperatures up to 40C in the shade. There are never watering restrictions but, of course, there is little natural water for much of June, July and August.

David Dickinson

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Re: Ipomoea
« Reply #54 on: October 04, 2021, 05:25:35 PM »
Success :-) The glitch seems to have sorted itself out.
I have a small garden in Rome, Italy. Some open soil, some concrete, some paved. Temperatures in winter occasionally down to 0C. Summer temperatures up to 40C in the shade. There are never watering restrictions but, of course, there is little natural water for much of June, July and August.

Umbrian

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Re: Ipomoea
« Reply #55 on: October 05, 2021, 07:19:09 AM »
So envious of those five flowers on your Ipomea alba David - bet the air was filled with their beautiful scent. All the buds on mine have failed to develop properly this year so far but am keeping my fingers crossed that one or two developing now will actually come to fruition.🤞
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.

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Fermi

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Re: Ipomoea
« Reply #56 on: October 05, 2021, 01:02:35 PM »
I found a tuber of Ipomaea lindheimeri while weeding the area where they grow!
cheers
fermi
Mr F de Sousa, Central Victoria, Australia
member of AGS, SRGC, NARGS
working as a physio to support my gardening habit!

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Charithea

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Re: Ipomoea
« Reply #57 on: October 05, 2021, 05:33:02 PM »
David your Ipomoea alba look fantastic.  Ours are getting ready to open. Up to now we have 4 buds. Sorry yours did not do well Carole. Our Ipomoea hederofolia var. lutea has also opened this morning. The flower is really small. The Ipomoea tuberculata is producing flowers daily. No seeds as yet.  I intend to collect them and planted somewhere where their lovely flowers can be seen.  Thank you both David and Carole for sharing the seeds.  I will try and photograph the lutea.
I garden in Cyprus, in a flat old farming field, alt. approx. 30 m asl.