Oxalis

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Fermi

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Re: Oxalis
« Reply #15 on: June 12, 2018, 05:10:25 AM »
Hi Charithea and Hilary,
It is a very pretty colour and one I particularly like.
Another even softer orange shade is found in Oxalis ciliaris.
These 2 pics are from one of our club meetings and the potful of Oxalis ciliaris belongs to Debbie, another member - mine hasn't even flowered this year!
cheers
fermi
Mr F de Sousa, Central Victoria, Australia
member of AGS, SRGC, NARGS
working as a physio to support my gardening habit!

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Charithea

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Re: Oxalis
« Reply #16 on: June 12, 2018, 10:01:08 AM »
Very beautiful Fermi.  We have a field full of oxalis pes-Capra every spring. Their yellow colour is too sharp for me and It takes ages to remove them. The only consolation is that they are recyclable. I give them to a friend who has lots of chickens.
I garden in Cyprus, in a flat old farming field, alt. approx. 30 m asl.

Umbrian

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Re: Oxalis
« Reply #17 on: June 13, 2018, 06:13:29 AM »
I think we appreciate some colours more than others perhaps because they occur less frequently and come as a pleasant surprise. There are some lovely apricot shades of Achillea that I love and also Verbena both of which make lovely additions when planting terracotta pots as they pick up the colour of the pot at different heights. Stunning when mixed with blue flowering subjects such as Plumbago for example.
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.

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Fermi

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Re: Oxalis
« Reply #18 on: May 14, 2020, 10:39:56 AM »
Oxalis palmifrons has put on a great show this autumn.
Its main drawback is that it wants to take over the world! It "runs" and is spreading - this is one we should've kept in a pot!
cheers
fermi
Mr F de Sousa, Central Victoria, Australia
member of AGS, SRGC, NARGS
working as a physio to support my gardening habit!

Umbrian

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Re: Oxalis
« Reply #19 on: May 15, 2020, 06:53:20 AM »
Quite beautiful though Fermi - the last photo really shows that😊
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.

Hilary

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Re: Oxalis
« Reply #20 on: May 15, 2020, 07:31:07 AM »
and the leaves, look at the leaves
MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

David Dickinson

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Re: Oxalis
« Reply #21 on: May 15, 2020, 10:40:50 AM »
I could become an Oxalis convert! The air is often blue as I see a new oxalis seedlings sprouting somewhere (usually about 20 times a day). You say "it wants to take over the world" Fermi. Is that by creeping or self seeding? Creeping I can cope with as most of my plants are in pots. Another self-seeding oxalis in the garden? Lovely as it is, I think I would have to be hard-hearted and say "no".
I have a small garden in Rome, Italy. Some open soil, some concrete, some paved. Temperatures in winter occasionally down to 0C. Summer temperatures up to 40C in the shade. There are never watering restrictions but, of course, there is little natural water for much of June, July and August.

David Dickinson

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Re: Oxalis
« Reply #22 on: May 15, 2020, 10:48:13 AM »
I have just read that O palmifrons can be grown from a leaf. Oh dear :-(
I have a small garden in Rome, Italy. Some open soil, some concrete, some paved. Temperatures in winter occasionally down to 0C. Summer temperatures up to 40C in the shade. There are never watering restrictions but, of course, there is little natural water for much of June, July and August.

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Fermi

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Re: Oxalis
« Reply #23 on: May 16, 2020, 04:26:20 PM »
David,
I suspect it does seed but can't be sure that a stray plant on the other side of the path wasn't actually from a bulb scattered by the birds. I've potted up bits dug out without bulbs and they have grown and flourished!
and the leaves, look at the leaves
Hilary,
it's mostly grown for the foliage effect - a single rosette looks like a Trachycarpus palm in miniature.
Here's a clump of Oxalis meisneri which has burgeoned over the past few years - it has petered out in the bed with the Oxalis palmifrons - you can see the remnants in one of the pics above!
cheers
fermi
Mr F de Sousa, Central Victoria, Australia
member of AGS, SRGC, NARGS
working as a physio to support my gardening habit!

David Dickinson

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Re: Oxalis
« Reply #24 on: May 16, 2020, 09:41:32 PM »
Fermi, stop tempting me! I am always on the lookout for something which will cover the surface of large pots and grow around the base of things without suffocating them. This Oxalis might have fit the bill but it disappears in summer I read. Still tempted though. Hhmmm?
I have a small garden in Rome, Italy. Some open soil, some concrete, some paved. Temperatures in winter occasionally down to 0C. Summer temperatures up to 40C in the shade. There are never watering restrictions but, of course, there is little natural water for much of June, July and August.

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Charithea

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Re: Oxalis
« Reply #25 on: May 17, 2020, 01:34:55 PM »
David go for it.  They are very pretty.  We have 2 other types of oxalis which when in flower look lovely. On the other hand I HATE Oxalis pes -caprae. I have a photograph take this March of sacks and sacks of these pesky weeds and that was only a part of them as I recycle them by giving them to my gardening neighbour for her 'ecological' chickens. The chickens could not keep up with the supply.  I have discovered my photo of the sacks of oxalis and posted it. You can only see part of the sacks as they others are hidden behind the re - growing yucca . A tractor and the community big track came and carried them to the recycling place. In return for this I will be working on village projects such as mosaics and replanting pots.
« Last Edit: May 17, 2020, 03:23:26 PM by Charithea »
I garden in Cyprus, in a flat old farming field, alt. approx. 30 m asl.

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Fermi

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Re: Oxalis
« Reply #26 on: September 24, 2020, 04:09:05 PM »
Oxalis obtusa 'Peaches & Cream' - a new selection from Craig Gardiner who is a new seller of bulbs - mainly South African.
The second pic shows the usual form of Oxalis obtusa next to 'Peaches & Cream'
cheers
fermi
Mr F de Sousa, Central Victoria, Australia
member of AGS, SRGC, NARGS
working as a physio to support my gardening habit!

David Dickinson

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Re: Oxalis
« Reply #27 on: September 24, 2020, 08:42:58 PM »
Very different. I prefer 'Peaches and Cream'. However, the very word  'oxalis' brings me out in a cold sweat and panic attacks have also been known. You are a very courageous soul to dare to try them. Or perhaps you always have a flame-thrower to hand?
I have a small garden in Rome, Italy. Some open soil, some concrete, some paved. Temperatures in winter occasionally down to 0C. Summer temperatures up to 40C in the shade. There are never watering restrictions but, of course, there is little natural water for much of June, July and August.

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Fermi

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Re: Oxalis
« Reply #28 on: September 25, 2020, 05:15:52 AM »
Hi David,
I've made a couple of mistakes with planting out oxalis - a lot have a propensity for world domination! I now keep most of them in pots. These are both in pots, but the type species is actually a seedling which appeared in a pot near but not next to the parent plant!
I rate oxalis pes-caprae as still the worst of them but there are tender species from South America which are just about impossible to keep in our climate - they like places like Ireland and Scotland.
cheers
fermi
Mr F de Sousa, Central Victoria, Australia
member of AGS, SRGC, NARGS
working as a physio to support my gardening habit!