Clerodendrum

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John

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Clerodendrum
« on: September 13, 2011, 09:08:15 AM »
I assume this is Clerodendrum splendens? This is the only time I recall coming across this species which was at the Rothschild Memorial Gardens. It does appear to be something of a climber and seems to be used in this manner even if it is only a lax shrub.
« Last Edit: November 10, 2011, 09:10:12 AM by Alisdair »
John
Horticulturist, photographer, author, garden designer and plant breeder; MGS member and RHS committee member. I garden at home in SW London and also at work in South London.

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oron peri

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Re: Clerodendrum splendens
« Reply #1 on: September 13, 2011, 01:14:25 PM »
Yes the name is correct and it is a showy climber, more sutible for arches and fances, less for a pergola, prefers a place protected from strong winds.
Garden Designer, Bulb man, Botanical tours guide.
Living and gardening in Tivon, Lower Galilee region, North Israel.
Min temp 5c Max 42c, around 450mm rain.

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Alisdair

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Re: Clerodendrum
« Reply #2 on: November 10, 2011, 09:16:43 AM »
For Mike's pictures of the similarly tender Clerodendrum chinense click here, and for Cali's picture and some more discussion click here.
Clerodendrums are mostly tropical or sub-tropical, flowering in summer, and generally like a humid atmosphere, shelter and little or no shade, with mild winters.
« Last Edit: July 04, 2012, 11:17:06 AM by Alisdair »
Alisdair Aird
Gardens in SE England (Sussex); also coastal Southern Greece, and (in a very small way) South West France; MGS member (and former president); vice chairman RHS Lily Group, past chairman Cyclamen Society

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MikeHardman

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Re: Clerodendrum
« Reply #3 on: July 01, 2012, 05:51:44 PM »
Re Clerodendrum chinense:
I note some advice: "Propagate by semi-woody cuttings in summer."
[http://www.gardensandplants.com/uk/plant.aspx?plant_id=900]
Since Thea (Joynes) asked me to obtain some of this plant for her, I shall try this.
I will keep an eye out for seeds later on, but I have a feeling it may not set any (the double flowers won't help).
« Last Edit: July 05, 2012, 10:04:16 PM by MikeHardman »
Mike
Geologist by Uni training, IT consultant, Referee for Viola for Botanical Society of the British Isles, commissioned author and photographer on Viola for RHS (Enc. of Perennials, The Garden, The Plantsman).
I garden near Polis, Cyprus, 100m alt., on marl, but have gardened mainly in S.England

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MikeHardman

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Re: Clerodendrum
« Reply #4 on: July 05, 2012, 10:03:29 PM »
Re Clerodendrum chinense:
The plants are in full flower now - fist-sized masses of double flowers, and big lush leaves - looking rather (sub)tropical, as you pointed out, Alisdair. They are also putting up shoots from below ground; I think from roots rather than stolons, but I can't be sure because of all the leaf litter. Thea, you'll be pleased to know I have some material for you - cuttings, some with a little root (from sub-soil shoots). I shall do my best with them for you. Some I shall start in water; I will post to inform the forum how that goes.
Mike
Geologist by Uni training, IT consultant, Referee for Viola for Botanical Society of the British Isles, commissioned author and photographer on Viola for RHS (Enc. of Perennials, The Garden, The Plantsman).
I garden near Polis, Cyprus, 100m alt., on marl, but have gardened mainly in S.England

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MikeHardman

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Clerodendrum thomsoniae
« Reply #5 on: December 08, 2020, 08:30:59 AM »
I just bought a very nice plant of Clerodendrum thomsoniae 'Delectum', on impulse at my local garden centre.
Now I read-up about it, I feel it might have been a mistake.
I see it prefers minimum 10C, shelter, some shade, moist rich organic soil.
However, similar preferences go for other clerodendrums we have discussed on this forum - many of which are grown successfully by members nonetheless.
This particular species is mentioned only by Thea (as a parent of her & John's C. x speciosa.
So - please can anybody who grows C. t.  outdoors tell me about their experiences with it?

Thanks in advance,
Mike
Mike
Geologist by Uni training, IT consultant, Referee for Viola for Botanical Society of the British Isles, commissioned author and photographer on Viola for RHS (Enc. of Perennials, The Garden, The Plantsman).
I garden near Polis, Cyprus, 100m alt., on marl, but have gardened mainly in S.England

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John J

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Re: Clerodendrum
« Reply #6 on: December 08, 2020, 10:47:02 AM »
Mike, we have no experience of this particular plant, just its offspring, C. x speciosa. We do have the shrub varieties C. chinense and C. bungei, also a cutting of C. trichotomum var. fargesii that we got from Sue Wake in Pelion at the last AGM in Greece. It seems to have taken and we are waiting anxiously to see if it survives another winter and makes progress next year. These are mostly considered to be sub-tropical but have survived our winters. We are at a lower altitude than you though.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

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MikeHardman

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Re: Clerodendrum
« Reply #7 on: December 08, 2020, 10:32:33 PM »
Thanks John.
I have a little shelter from some of my bigger Cupressus (but those have very aggressive roots), and some shelter from Bougainvilleas (but apart from the root competition, I don't want to have the Clerodendrum clambering up the B. or I'd never be able to prune the B.)
I wonder, if given no support, it would perform as a sprawling groundcover, whence it might shelter itself a little.
More pondering required...
Mike
Geologist by Uni training, IT consultant, Referee for Viola for Botanical Society of the British Isles, commissioned author and photographer on Viola for RHS (Enc. of Perennials, The Garden, The Plantsman).
I garden near Polis, Cyprus, 100m alt., on marl, but have gardened mainly in S.England

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John J

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Re: Clerodendrum
« Reply #8 on: December 09, 2020, 08:21:11 AM »
I realise that this is a little off line but we also have a plant that used to be a Clerodendrum, C. ugandense, when we first encountered it several years ago. It took us a long time to finally acquire one that seems to be establishing slowly and has produced a flower a couple of days ago. In the intervening period it has suffered a name change and is now Rotheca myricoides.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

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MikeHardman

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Re: Clerodendrum
« Reply #9 on: December 09, 2020, 09:54:52 PM »
Thanks John.
The Rotheca myricoides I know, at Latchi, is at about 3m altitude and growing nicely. I hope your one picks up vigour soon.
Mike
Geologist by Uni training, IT consultant, Referee for Viola for Botanical Society of the British Isles, commissioned author and photographer on Viola for RHS (Enc. of Perennials, The Garden, The Plantsman).
I garden near Polis, Cyprus, 100m alt., on marl, but have gardened mainly in S.England