Endemics

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Fleur Pavlidis

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Re: Endemics
« Reply #15 on: March 27, 2020, 07:42:49 PM »
Does that mean that Oron now has his Arum sintenisii and I dont have to keep one on hand for him in case he turns up demanding it? I can't imagine how this got rare. Its prolific.
MGS member, Greece. I garden in Attica, Greece and Mt Goulinas (450m) Central Greece

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John J

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Re: Endemics
« Reply #16 on: March 27, 2020, 08:09:20 PM »
Yes, I took 2 to Jordan for him if they survived the trip. You're right the ones I have planted around the garden have really taken off and are much larger than the original plant that I took them from. They seem to have a much harder time in the wild.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

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John J

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Re: Endemics
« Reply #17 on: December 20, 2020, 08:17:28 AM »
Last year we were fortunate enough to acquire a specimen of the Cretan endemic Petromarula pinnata. Unfortunately towards the end of the year slugs demolished it overnight, leaves, stems, everything. A couple of weeks ago however we were amazed and delighted to see that it had reappeared from nowhere. Hopefully the stones around it now will be a deterrent for the slugs and we'll keep a closer eye on it.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

David Dickinson

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Re: Endemics
« Reply #18 on: December 21, 2020, 12:05:12 AM »
Petromarula pinnata is a plant that I tried to grow from seed a couple of years ago. Masses of them germinated for me bit it was the year when we had several severe swings in temperature and I didn't get any past the seedling stage. They look beautiful in the photos that I have seen of them. It seems they are quite capable of growing in crevices on bare rock faces. Good luck with it.
I have a small garden in Rome, Italy. Some open soil, some concrete, some paved. Temperatures in winter occasionally down to 0C. Summer temperatures up to 40C in the shade. There are never watering restrictions but, of course, there is little natural water for much of June, July and August.

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John J

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Re: Endemics
« Reply #19 on: January 24, 2021, 11:36:34 AM »
Although the Arum sintenisii is no longer classed as an endemic, having been recorded in Southern Turkey, I'm still posting the photos of the first flower of the year here.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

David Dickinson

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Re: Endemics
« Reply #20 on: January 24, 2021, 03:36:37 PM »
Hi John

No sign of the ones you kindly sent poking through yet. I'll have a more thorough check when it stops raining. Yet again!

Having said that, here in Rome I have nothing like the profusion of flowers you guys are posting. Some salvias still in flower. S. guaranitica 'Costa Rica Blue' in particular (a couple of cuttings of those in the pack I recently sent you - hope they survive the journey).

Maddeningly, Pseudogynoxys chenopodioide is trying to flower but with little success. I don't understand it. You post photos with its flowers in your May wreaths, The plant I took the cutting from in my neighbourhood several years ago flowered from late spring to early winter. Mine? Nothing all year and then a last minute burst in late autumn. The same story every year  :'(
I have a small garden in Rome, Italy. Some open soil, some concrete, some paved. Temperatures in winter occasionally down to 0C. Summer temperatures up to 40C in the shade. There are never watering restrictions but, of course, there is little natural water for much of June, July and August.