Plants of the world on postage stamps

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Hilary

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Re: Plants of the world on postage stamps
« Reply #1275 on: May 12, 2021, 06:11:57 AM »
I had ordered some stamps from Algeria which took a long time in turning up in our P.O.BOX. The stamps arrived in  beautiful condition via the Czech Republic in an envelope bearing this lovely stamp. An added bonus

Emberiza
This stamp was issued by the Czech Republic in 2020 in a two-stamp series named
SONG BIRDS IN OUR NEIGHBOURHOOD

Emberiza calandra
, Strnad lucni, Corn bunting

Emberiza hortulana, Strnad zahradni, Ortolan bunting

Emberiza citronella, Strnad obecny, Yellowhammer

Emberiza schoeniclus, Strad rakosni, Common reed bunting

Buntings are mentioned in
LEARNING TO LOVE STINGING NETTLES AND THISTLES
By Fleur Pavlidis
THE MEDITERRANEAN GARDEN number 23, January 2001
MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

Hilary

  • Hero Member
Re: Plants of the world on postage stamps
« Reply #1276 on: May 13, 2021, 06:33:37 AM »
Tilia cordata, Small leaved lime

Ukraine issued a series of four stamps in 2017 named MEDICINAL PLANTS

Tilia is mentioned in a list of useful trees
THE MEDITERRANEAN GARDEN number 49, July 2007
REPLACING TREES AFTER A FOREST FIRE
BY Peter Eaton

MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

Hilary

  • Hero Member
Re: Plants of the world on postage stamps
« Reply #1277 on: May 14, 2021, 06:30:51 AM »
Grape pressing
In 1981 Malta issued a series of 16 stamps named
THE HISTORY OF MALTESE INDUSTRY
The wine industry is mentioned in
THE SOUTH AUSTRALIAN SETTLEMENT
By Lynne Chatterton
THE MEDITERRANEAN GARDEN number 73, July 2013t
MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

*

Charithea

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Re: Plants of the world on postage stamps
« Reply #1278 on: May 14, 2021, 02:48:52 PM »
The stamp reminded me of our younger days when we used to pick grapes in the heat.  It was back breaking labour.  My aunt would 'invite us'  every year to help. After several hours of dust and perspiration the magic was lost.  And yet we used to go back again the following year until my aunt decided she was too old for it and gave the vineyard to her third son.
I garden in Cyprus, in a flat old farming field, alt. approx. 30 m asl.

Hilary

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Re: Plants of the world on postage stamps
« Reply #1279 on: May 16, 2021, 07:37:26 AM »
Achillea clypeolata

A stamp issued in a six-stamp series named LOCAL FLORA by Yugoslavia in 1965

Achilleas are mentioned in
THE RENAISSANCE OF A GARDEN
 IN RHODES
By Manuela de Montalembert
THE MEDITERRANEAN GARDEN number 34. October 2003
MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

Hilary

  • Hero Member
Re: Plants of the world on postage stamps
« Reply #1280 on: May 19, 2021, 06:56:54 AM »
Alcedo atthis, ISFUGL, Common Kingfisher 

A stamp issued by Denmark in 1975 in a four-stamp series named
ENDANGERED ANIMALS

The Kingfisher is mentioned in a couple of issues of
THE MEDITERRANEAN GARDEN

I chose number 53, July 2008 for you to re-read
PIA’S GARDEN by Ida Tonini

The coloured scan of part of a page from the Nouveau Larousse Illustre shows the Common Kingfisher at number 1
MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

Hilary

  • Hero Member
Re: Plants of the world on postage stamps
« Reply #1281 on: May 21, 2021, 07:25:07 AM »
Cotton growing

In 1981 Malta issued a series of 16 stamps named
THE HISTORY OF MALTESE INDUSTRY

After diligently searching the journal index, I came across an article which I had not referred to before, at least for cotton

PLANTING WITH STYLE AND CONVICTION:
 USING PLANTS THAT CAN SURVIVE UNPREDICTABLE WEATHER PATTERNS
By Julia Catton
THE MEDITERRANEAN GARDEN number 88, April 2017
MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

*

Charithea

  • Hero Member
Re: Plants of the world on postage stamps
« Reply #1282 on: May 25, 2021, 03:51:14 PM »
Hilary, I read the postings and later respond depending on what my morning schedule is. The growing cotton stamp brought back memories of years ago. Being an agricultural area and with the biggest river running by, my mum grew cotton, sesame and also okra.  I liked pulling out the sesame stalks and placing them in a tipi shape. I hated picking the cotton as it made the hands bleed but also disliked the okra as they also caused pain to my then young hands. Now I have some okra growing but only for their flowers.
I garden in Cyprus, in a flat old farming field, alt. approx. 30 m asl.

Hilary

  • Hero Member
Re: Plants of the world on postage stamps
« Reply #1283 on: May 25, 2021, 07:35:29 PM »
I love to read about you childhood memories which usually include references to farm work
MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

Hilary

  • Hero Member
Re: Plants of the world on postage stamps
« Reply #1284 on: May 26, 2021, 05:16:25 AM »
Felis catus, Cat

This stamp was issued by Denmark in 1975 to celebrate the 100th Anniversary of the Danish Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals

As you can imagine cats are mentioned in passing in very many issues of THE MEDITERRANEAN GARDEN
I chose OUR GREEK GARDEN
By John Mole
THE MEDITERRANEAN GARDEN number 101, July 2020

The photo is of Tigris one of my granddaughters’ cats
MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

*

Charithea

  • Hero Member
Re: Plants of the world on postage stamps
« Reply #1285 on: May 26, 2021, 01:18:44 PM »
Cats are gorgeous creatures!  It is nothing like romanticising 'farming'!  My cousin who left Cyprus to study in Canada and made his home there'adores' our pre-teen years. He reminds me of the 'happy times' spent aiding our respective mums in the fields. His parents also run the village bakery. He even finds olive picking exciting.   We spent our long summer school holidays picking potatoes and conjugating Greek verbs in Katharevusa while we spoke the demotic language at home. Carob picking in the hot month of August was also another chore. Nothing enjoyable just fingers pricked by dead thistles and other spikey grasses. The best part was that we were safe from mischief.
« Last Edit: May 27, 2021, 12:29:05 PM by Charithea »
I garden in Cyprus, in a flat old farming field, alt. approx. 30 m asl.

Hilary

  • Hero Member
Re: Plants of the world on postage stamps
« Reply #1286 on: May 27, 2021, 07:09:41 AM »
Robinia pseudoacacia, False acacia, Black locust

Bulgaria issued a series of six stamps in 1987 named BEES AND PLANTS

Robinia is quite a favourite tree in some towns in Greece. The photos are of a tree in Loutraki, Corinthia

Robinia pseudoacacia is mentioned in
 SUCCESSES AND FAILURES IN NORTHERN PROVENCE
By Kathryn Williams 
THE MEDITERRANEAN GARDEN number 32, April 2003

MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

*

John J

  • Hero Member
Re: Plants of the world on postage stamps
« Reply #1287 on: May 27, 2021, 08:15:40 AM »
This tree is not native to Cyprus but the Forestry Department have found a useful way to utilise it. Asbestos was mined in Cyprus for around 80 years before the discovery of its dangerous side led to it being no longer a commercial proposition to carry on. A massive amount of devastation was caused to an area of the Troodos Forest so large that it could be seen from space. The Forestry Department inherited the task of repairing this damage, one that has been ongoing for several years. They have created a Botanical Garden on part of the site, with a Visitor Centre housed in one of the old mine buildings that has been renovated to look, on the outside, exactly as it did when in use while the interior has been remodeled for its current task.
The majority of the area is gradually being brought back to life with new plantings, seeding, etc, using mainly plants that are native to the location. However some use is made of pioneer plants that grow quickly and spread by such methods as suckering so helping to stabilise the soil on slopes, and so on. The tree mentioned above, Robinia pseudoacacia, is one of these that has been drafted in for that purpose. Among its other assets are the fact that it will grow in poor soil, at the altitude required, its flowers attract bees, its leaves can be eaten by the native mouflon and its bark by hares.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

Hilary

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Re: Plants of the world on postage stamps
« Reply #1288 on: June 01, 2021, 05:54:53 AM »
Lavandula vera, English lavender

A stamp issued by Bulgaria in 1987 in a six-stamp series named
BEES AND PLANTS

The photo was taken at a local shopping Mall a couple of years ago, the plant is lavender but not English lavender

Lavender is mentioned in
INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE IN PALERMO ON GREEN SPACES IN MEDITERRANEAN CITIES
By Piero Caneti
THE MEDITERRANEAN GARDEN number three, Winter 1995/6

The third issue of the journal is available as a free download
https://www.mediterraneangardensociety.org/journal3.pdf
MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

Hilary

  • Hero Member
Re: Plants of the world on postage stamps
« Reply #1289 on: June 02, 2021, 07:28:52 AM »
Erinaceus europaeus, PINDSVIN, European hedgehog

A stamp issued by Denmark in 1975 in a four-stamp series named
ENDANGERED ANIMALS

Hedgehogs are mentioned in many issues of THE MEDITERRANEAN GARDEN I chose number 23, January 2001
For you to read
GARDENS MISSED BY Gillian Oberli

MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care