Shades of blue

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David Dickinson

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Re: Shades of blue
« Reply #15 on: July 02, 2020, 09:29:35 AM »
I think I should hand in my notice at the British Council over the "American Cup Affair". To make matters worse, frustrated as I was with what Umbrian rightly points out as an "annoying" measuring system for baking, I gave in and bought a set of American measuring cups. As measuring cups work on volume their is no exact general weight equivalent. You need  find the weight equivalent of the specific ingredient you are using. A cup of sugar weighs more than a cup of oats, I understand. :'(
I have a small garden in Rome, Italy. Some open soil, some concrete, some paved. Temperatures in winter occasionally down to 0C. Summer temperatures up to 40C in the shade. There are never watering restrictions but, of course, there is little natural water for much of June, July and August.

Hilary

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Re: Shades of blue
« Reply #16 on: July 02, 2020, 09:34:04 AM »
I thought about going round the house and measuring all the different cup sizes there seem to be .
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Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

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Charithea

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Re: Shades of blue
« Reply #17 on: August 04, 2020, 10:32:51 AM »
Our Clerodedrum bungei has flowered. It took  its time. It is not as good as it was the first time but I have learnt to be grateful for any blooms.
I garden in Cyprus, in a flat old farming field, alt. approx. 30 m asl.

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Charithea

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Re: Shades of blue
« Reply #18 on: August 07, 2020, 12:01:46 PM »
I am posting a photo of our Clerodendrum trichotomum variety fargesii. It was given to me by Sue Wake. In fact she dug it up from her garden, in Lagouraxi, as I had expressed admiration of her flowering tree in her garden in Pelio. It made its way here like all my other cuttings and a Good site was found to plant it. In the winter the tree became just a stick and kept shrinking but when the spring came along, it came alive with a lot of branches. I am not sure if it will flower this autumn but I am happy to wait. I am posting a photo of Sue's tree from last October.
« Last Edit: August 07, 2020, 12:16:29 PM by Charithea »
I garden in Cyprus, in a flat old farming field, alt. approx. 30 m asl.

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Charithea

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Re: Shades of blue
« Reply #19 on: September 24, 2021, 04:20:30 PM »
Our evenings are becoming cooler and suddenly the Salvias are looking perky and some are also flowering. The photo of the Salvia Guaranitica Costa Rican Blue is not in focus and I apologise. It is a cutting form the original plant that David Dickinson gave me a few years back,  Thank you again David.  The other is the Salvia leucantha.
« Last Edit: September 26, 2021, 09:55:44 AM by Charithea »
I garden in Cyprus, in a flat old farming field, alt. approx. 30 m asl.

Umbrian

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Re: Shades of blue
« Reply #20 on: September 26, 2021, 08:05:36 AM »
My Costa Rican Blue ( also from David!) has been most disappointing  this year - two short flowering spikes early that soon gave up in the heat. New growth has so far produced no flowers. My leucantha is also reluctant to flower but looking healthy enough. Each year is different I find which makes gardening such a compulsive habit I suppose😊
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.

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Charithea

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Re: Shades of blue
« Reply #21 on: September 26, 2021, 10:48:22 AM »
You are correct Carole about gardening being a compulsive habit.  If I had my truthers I would have like to be able to carry on with my sport in tantum  with the the gardening.  Getting old has its price!  My original Costa Rican Blue is on its last legs.  They are difficult to keep them going.  My Salvia Martinusburg  which were thriving in the ground died.  All three of them. Luckily I have some in pots for taking cuttings.  Even the tougher Salvia leucantha have died. I have one 'Midnight' left and it is next to the others that are under the Avocado tree and gets some water from the veg. garden.  I am posting one photo of the leucantha that is under the tree and gets lots of water again from the veg garden. If I could have an enormous Umbrella I am sure I will be more successful with Salvias.
« Last Edit: September 27, 2021, 06:21:06 PM by Charithea »
I garden in Cyprus, in a flat old farming field, alt. approx. 30 m asl.

David Dickinson

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Re: Shades of blue
« Reply #22 on: September 26, 2021, 02:34:10 PM »
3 years ago I was in a park in London and saw a marvellous display of some kind of caryopteris. A sheet of vivid blue. I wrote the the local parks department but they weren't able to help with name. I have tried with various ceanothus plants without success. Lack of success was, I suspect, needing to water the plants as they were in pots and the combination of water in high temperatures. A common killer of Californian natives. Caryopteris, I decided, might fill the gap.

I have managed to find 3 different plants

Caryopteris x clandonensis heavenly blue (first 2 photos)

For me it is a bit of a disappointment. Leaves comparatively small, straggly growth. Occasionally wilted in the intense heat of summer. Started to flower about 3 weeks ago.

 Caryopteris 'Grand Blue' (3rd and 4th photos)

Larger leaves than above and denser foliage. Fuller appearance and more flowers. Occasional wilting in extreme heat. Came into flower last week.

Caryopteris incana (last 2 photos)

Largest leaves of the 3. Dense and dark foliage very attractive and a little more compact than the other 2.  Has never show signs of wilting. This would have been the clear winner except for the fact the flowers came through pale pink! I wasn't expecting that to happen and rather spoils the "shades of blue" thread. The buds looked white while they were developing which was a nice contrast to the dark leaves. They took a while to develop. It came into flower last week.

All 3 are very attractive to bees.


I have a small garden in Rome, Italy. Some open soil, some concrete, some paved. Temperatures in winter occasionally down to 0C. Summer temperatures up to 40C in the shade. There are never watering restrictions but, of course, there is little natural water for much of June, July and August.