Are these Freesias?

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David Dickinson

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Are these Freesias?
« on: May 23, 2016, 04:36:03 PM »
A friend who was leaving Rome left me a large pot of Agapanthus. In with them are the plants in the attached photos. Are they some kind of Freesia? Seed pods are currently ripening so they are probably a species or fertile hybrid. My other cultivar Freesias do not produce any seed or seed heads at all. All suggestions gratefully received. :)
I have a small garden in Rome, Italy. Some open soil, some concrete, some paved. Temperatures in winter occasionally down to 0C. Summer temperatures up to 40C in the shade. There are never watering restrictions but, of course, there is little natural water for much of June, July and August.

David Dickinson

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Re: Are these Freesias?
« Reply #1 on: May 27, 2016, 09:57:56 AM »
Should say also that the leaves that you see in the picture are of the Agapanthus. The leaves of the flower in question are freesia like. The seed pods are being very slow to develop (the plant flowered in February) and they are like a slightly larger version of Anomatheca laxa seed pods. The seed heads of that plant are fully ripe for me in a matter of a couple of weeks sometimes. I suppose that is because A laxa flowers later (they are in flower now) and the seeds develop at the higher temperatures of late spring.
I have a small garden in Rome, Italy. Some open soil, some concrete, some paved. Temperatures in winter occasionally down to 0C. Summer temperatures up to 40C in the shade. There are never watering restrictions but, of course, there is little natural water for much of June, July and August.

David Dickinson

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Re: Are these Freesias?
« Reply #2 on: May 27, 2016, 10:13:44 AM »
Having done a little research on the internet they might be F fucata. Or at least have that in the mix somewhere if they are a hybrid. The identifying feature apparently is a three-pointed bract at the base of the flower, I may have to wait until next year to find out if that is the case.
I have a small garden in Rome, Italy. Some open soil, some concrete, some paved. Temperatures in winter occasionally down to 0C. Summer temperatures up to 40C in the shade. There are never watering restrictions but, of course, there is little natural water for much of June, July and August.

David Dickinson

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Re: Are these Freesias?
« Reply #3 on: June 08, 2020, 09:04:24 AM »
I finally checked the number of points on the bracts and there are 2, not 3. That suggests they are Freesia leichtlinii. I read that what was once considered a species, F alba, is now considered a subspecies of F leichtlinii Very beautiful just the same.
I have a small garden in Rome, Italy. Some open soil, some concrete, some paved. Temperatures in winter occasionally down to 0C. Summer temperatures up to 40C in the shade. There are never watering restrictions but, of course, there is little natural water for much of June, July and August.

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Charithea

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Re: Are these Freesias?
« Reply #4 on: June 08, 2020, 12:50:11 PM »
Eureka David. It is a satisfying feeling when one manages to identify a plant, flower etc. This morning I was sorting out my  computer cds which I used when teaching science and there was Carole's CD with the presentation she gave in the AGM in Athens years ago.  I remember showing it to the other teacher as an example of how they could create a Mediterranean garden and get rid of their lawns. It reminded me  of how amazing Carole's old garden was.  I am sure that her new smaller one will be equally wonderful. In the video I spotted my unnamed Salvia.  Now I have to ask Carole to look at her video and tell me the name.
I garden in Cyprus, in a flat old farming field, alt. approx. 30 m asl.

Umbrian

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Re: Are these Freesias?
« Reply #5 on: June 09, 2020, 09:19:26 AM »
Blushes all round here Charithea for your kind words and having to admit I have  no idea where my copy of that presentation is.......must see if I can find it.......happy days....
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.

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Charithea

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Re: Are these Freesias?
« Reply #6 on: June 10, 2020, 12:07:31 PM »
Carole, you might remember that a few years ago I mentioned our desire to create a Mediterranean garden/Botanic garden in the surrounding ground where a small Byzantine church is  here in the village. There were/are obstacles as it comes under the control of the Antiquities Department. After many letters and false promises I managed to get an appointment with the Head of the department for the middle if March for there final decision. Of course with the corona virus it was cancelled but I am sure I will get another as I had used the influence of the ex European Commissioner of the Environment to get the first one.They stipulate that trees are not allowed to be planted and they want a plan of what is to be planted. John and I made a list and Yiannos Orphanos is helping with the plans. I thought of taking with me your CD  as a visual aid and not just relay on the drawings. They will see how good the drought tolerant plants can be arranged.  Will this be OK with you?
I garden in Cyprus, in a flat old farming field, alt. approx. 30 m asl.

Umbrian

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Re: Are these Freesias?
« Reply #7 on: June 11, 2020, 08:21:08 AM »
Of course Charithea- information/experience is always for sharing and I feel honoured that you want to use it. Congratulations on your determination to get this project going and fingers crossed a new appointment in soon arranged.
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.