Fruit/Veg of the day

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John J

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Re: Fruit/Veg of the day - Rosemary
« Reply #60 on: November 15, 2015, 05:51:11 AM »
......and how could I possibly miss the Rosemary ???
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

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John J

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Re: Fruit/Veg of the day - Loquat
« Reply #61 on: November 16, 2015, 05:41:58 AM »
We return to the loquat as ours are coming into flower now. Even if you don't eat the fruit you can still enjoy the scent of the blossom.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

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Fleur Pavlidis

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Re: Fruit/Veg of the day
« Reply #62 on: November 16, 2015, 08:30:17 AM »
Absolutely overpowering from our two trees, like a room full of soap bars.
MGS member, Greece. I garden in Attica, Greece and Mt Goulinas (450m) Central Greece

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John J

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Re: Fruit/Veg of the day - Parsley
« Reply #63 on: November 17, 2015, 05:49:49 AM »
Spreads prolifically, puts down very long, tough roots. Acts as a host for the caterpillars of the Swallowtail butterfly in addition to its normal duties in providing greenery for domestic use.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

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John J

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Re: Fruit/Veg of the day - Tagetes lucida
« Reply #64 on: November 18, 2015, 05:49:14 AM »
Tarragon, attractive flowers as well as being a useful herb.
« Last Edit: November 19, 2015, 08:36:53 AM by John J »
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

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JTh

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Re: Fruit/Veg of the day
« Reply #65 on: November 18, 2015, 11:55:55 AM »
That does not look French tarragon, Artemisia dracunculus, isn't it Mexican tarragon, Tagetes lucida?
Retired veterinary surgeon by training with a PhD in parasitology,  but worked as a virologist since 1992.
Member of the MGS  since 2004. Gardening in Oslo and to a limited extent in Halkidiki, Greece.

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John J

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Re: Fruit/Veg of the day
« Reply #66 on: November 18, 2015, 03:35:13 PM »
I may be wrong, Jorun, but I'll stick with Artemesia, at least until I've had a chance to investigate it further.
« Last Edit: November 18, 2015, 03:52:13 PM by John J »
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

Caroline

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Re: Fruit/Veg of the day
« Reply #67 on: November 19, 2015, 08:17:09 AM »
I think Jorun is correct, John, in identifying your plant as Tagetes lucida, which does have yellow edible flowers and can be propagated by seed.  French tarragon -Artemisia dracunculus- doesn't set seed (indeed I have never seen even the hint of a flower) and has to be propagated vegetatively.

Mexican tarragon is supposed to survive better in hot conditions and have a stronger flavour than the French stuff.  I once mistakenly grew Russian tarragon -A. dracunculus ssp dracunculoides - which is much more vigorous than the French version and got totally out of control.  Some sort of moral for our times there, maybe...
I am establishing a garden on Waiheke Island, 35 minutes out of Auckland. The site is windy, the clay soil dries out quickly in summer and is like plasticine in winter, but it is still very rewarding. Water is an issue, as we depend on tanks. I'm looking forward to sharing ideas. Caroline

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John J

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Re: Fruit/Veg of the day
« Reply #68 on: November 19, 2015, 08:35:47 AM »
I've obviously been guilty of believing what I read on the Internet, having found several photos of a plant similar to mine that were labelled as Artemesia dracunculus, without looking more closely into it. Having now done so I see that it is indeed Tagetes lucida. So, thanks, Jorun, for putting me right on this, and Caroline, for your insightful input, on all levels.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

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JTh

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Re: Fruit/Veg of the day
« Reply #69 on: November 19, 2015, 05:17:37 PM »
Which shows you can't always trust the internet, John.

I have both the Russian and the French variety of tarragon in my garden in Oslo, the first one is much taller and more vigorous, but it isn't too difficult to keep it under control. When it is fresh, the taste of the Russian tarragon is OK, but there is no flavour when it is dried. The flowers are inconspicious, and does produce seeds, while the French variety is totally sterile, I have never seen any flowers, but it is easily propagated by divison.

It would be interesting to try to grow the Mexican tarragon in Greece, I have never seen or tasted this one. We have just prepared a small vegetable patch which is ready to be planted next spring. Did you grow it from seeds?
Retired veterinary surgeon by training with a PhD in parasitology,  but worked as a virologist since 1992.
Member of the MGS  since 2004. Gardening in Oslo and to a limited extent in Halkidiki, Greece.

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John J

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Re: Fruit/Veg of the day
« Reply #70 on: November 20, 2015, 05:46:23 AM »
I don't see any reason why you shouldn't, Jorun, ours is in full sun for much of the day. We didn't grow them from seed but got them from a local 'garden centre'. I'll try to find out how they got them, but you know how it can be getting useful info out of some of these places. If I find anything helpful I'll let you know.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

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JTh

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Re: Fruit/Veg of the day
« Reply #71 on: November 20, 2015, 02:46:38 PM »
Thank you, John
Retired veterinary surgeon by training with a PhD in parasitology,  but worked as a virologist since 1992.
Member of the MGS  since 2004. Gardening in Oslo and to a limited extent in Halkidiki, Greece.

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John J

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Re: Fruit/Veg of the day - Sweet potato
« Reply #72 on: November 23, 2015, 10:49:18 AM »
We've tried growing Ipomoae batatas several times and had lots of foliage but this is the first time that one has flowered.
The second photo shows the foliage of another variety that I believe is known as 'Blackie'. This produces lots of foliage each year but has yet to flower.
« Last Edit: November 23, 2015, 10:56:18 AM by John J »
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

Joanna Savage

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Re: Fruit/Veg of the day
« Reply #73 on: November 24, 2015, 06:15:05 AM »
John J, do you cook and eat the tubers of the sweet potato?

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John J

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Re: Fruit/Veg of the day
« Reply #74 on: November 24, 2015, 11:22:56 AM »
Actually, Joanna, we don't grow enough of them to produce a viable crop. We use them for ornamental purposes, mostly in pots, and really to see what the flowers look like. We've eventually found out about one of them, now for the dark leaved one, which is actually much darker than it appears in the photo. Maybe one day we'll plant some in the ground, give them adequate water and see if we can get enough to make at least one serving!
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)