Plant of the Day

  • 488 Replies
  • 113741 Views

David Dickinson

  • Hero Member
    • Email
Re: Plant of the Day
« Reply #480 on: October 13, 2021, 08:52:34 am »
. It is Rotheca myricoides  or as I used to know it Clerodendrum ugandense.  This plant did a lot of travelling to arrive in this garden. It struggled in  our hot climate, lost branches and leaves but it has survive and produced its flower.  There are another 2 buds to open.

Hi Charithea,

Just to give you some hope of more success with Rotheca myricoides, I saw 2 plants growing in the beds of La Landriana. I don't know if they receive any artificial irrigation but they both looked healthy. I have never noticed them before as stalls at the plant fair usually block them from view. This year was very hot and the summer lasted longer than usual, so there is hope.
I have a small garden in Rome, Italy. Some open soil, some concrete, some paved. Temperatures in winter occasionally down to 0C. Summer temperatures up to 40C in the shade. There are never watering restrictions but, of course, there is little natural water for much of June, July and August.

*

Charithea

  • Hero Member
Re: Plant of the Day
« Reply #481 on: October 13, 2021, 06:06:26 pm »
Thank you David.  They do look healthy. Ours is still putting up a fight. It is now three sticks and it produced a few more flowers. They  were difficult to photograph because it requiresd lying on the ground to get them in focus. I have been watering it Every  Day.  I have also been washing off all the infestations from  its leaves with soapy water.  We just need some rain to wash off the dust and give it a deep drink.
I garden in Cyprus, in a flat old farming field, alt. approx. 30 m asl.

David Dickinson

  • Hero Member
    • Email
Re: Plant of the Day - Bougainvillea
« Reply #482 on: October 29, 2021, 11:19:28 pm »
Never work with kids, animals or plants, as the saying goes. Like the time when I was wondering to myself "Why do I never see hedgehogs in my garden?" and the very same evening the one and only hedgehog ever seen in my garden came wandering through.

"Why do I never see bougainvillea spreading through trees in Rome like I used to when I lived in Australia?" You guessed it...
I have a small garden in Rome, Italy. Some open soil, some concrete, some paved. Temperatures in winter occasionally down to 0C. Summer temperatures up to 40C in the shade. There are never watering restrictions but, of course, there is little natural water for much of June, July and August.

*

Fermi

  • Hero Member
    • Email
Re: Plant of the Day
« Reply #483 on: October 30, 2021, 03:37:18 am »
Most of the year you would think that Aphyllanthes monspeliensis is some sort of grass or sedge, then in spring it reveals its place in the lily family when the blue flowers appear,
cheers
fermi
Mr F de Sousa, Central Victoria, Australia
member of AGS, SRGC, NARGS
working as a physio to support my gardening habit!

David Dickinson

  • Hero Member
    • Email
Re: Plant of the Day
« Reply #484 on: October 30, 2021, 07:25:12 am »
How lucky you are to be able to grow Aphyllanthes monspeliensis. I tried a couple of times but without success. It is an Italian plant but its natural distribution is limited to the northern counties. Too hot in Lazio? http://luirig.altervista.org/flora/taxa/index1.php?scientific-name=aphyllanthes+monspeliensis

I tried seeds of Orthrosanthus multiflorus, Australian, one time but they didn't germinate. Perhaps I'll try again. Similar to Aphyllanthes monspeliensis in effect but not quite so grass-like. https://www.lullfitz.com.au/orthrosanthus-multiflorus

I have a small garden in Rome, Italy. Some open soil, some concrete, some paved. Temperatures in winter occasionally down to 0C. Summer temperatures up to 40C in the shade. There are never watering restrictions but, of course, there is little natural water for much of June, July and August.

David Dickinson

  • Hero Member
    • Email
Re: Plant of the Day, Plumbago europeas
« Reply #485 on: October 31, 2021, 12:39:13 am »
I see this plant occasionally in various places near my house. But usually in smaller clumps. This one gave me the idea that it could be useful in the garden as it was much bushier than I normally see. Most other things around it were badly burned  but this stood out from a distance. I am sure if all the stray tree leaves trapped in the leaves of this plant could easily be removed etc. making the plant look good.

David :-)
I have a small garden in Rome, Italy. Some open soil, some concrete, some paved. Temperatures in winter occasionally down to 0C. Summer temperatures up to 40C in the shade. There are never watering restrictions but, of course, there is little natural water for much of June, July and August.

*

John J

  • Hero Member
Re: Plant of the Day
« Reply #486 on: November 12, 2021, 06:29:17 am »
One of the benefits of being an early riser is that you get to see flowers that open overnight, such as the ones on this Ipomoea alba, before they begin to close up for the day. Commonly known as Moonflower, I've tried to use my hand to show its size.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

Umbrian

  • Hero Member
    • Email
Re: Plant of the Day
« Reply #487 on: November 12, 2021, 08:30:59 am »
Lucky you John- not a single flower opened on my plant this year- all withering and remaining curled up just as reaching maturity.😢
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.

David Dickinson

  • Hero Member
    • Email
Re: Plant of the Day
« Reply #488 on: November 12, 2021, 10:09:28 am »
I have only just noticed that the post above about Plumbago europaea above didn't have the relevant photos attached. Apologies, and here they are.

I have a small garden in Rome, Italy. Some open soil, some concrete, some paved. Temperatures in winter occasionally down to 0C. Summer temperatures up to 40C in the shade. There are never watering restrictions but, of course, there is little natural water for much of June, July and August.