Orobanche IDd by John as O. ramosa - relatives discussed

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Hilary

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Orobanche IDd by John as O. ramosa - relatives discussed
« on: August 09, 2011, 10:53:46 AM »
I saw this Orobanche in Sparta on a piece of waste ground next to overflowing rubbish bins.
Having just looked at theplantlist.org think it might be Orobanche mutelii.
What do you think?
« Last Edit: October 25, 2011, 06:50:01 PM by Alisdair »
MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

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John

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Re: Orobanche
« Reply #1 on: August 09, 2011, 09:59:21 PM »
I think it is quite difficult to say but it could well be. It could also be O. ramosa which is a very close relative and O. mutelii is also considered a subsp. of O. ramosa. A main feature of O. mutelii is that it has larger flowers than o. ramosa! Perhaps not possible to tell form the photograph. Colour doesn't help either as they seem to be as variable as each other!
John
Horticulturist, photographer, author, garden designer and plant breeder; MGS member and RHS committee member. I garden at home in SW London and also at work in South London.

Hilary

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Re: Orobanche
« Reply #2 on: August 11, 2011, 03:33:29 PM »
Thanks for the reply.I'll go with the ramosa.
Hilary
MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

*

John

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Re: Orobanche
« Reply #3 on: September 06, 2011, 07:09:12 PM »
O. ramosa is incredibly common, certainly on Crete where it can form huge drifts as it is happy to parasitise Oxalis pes-caprae which is almost everywhere. The other species which I encountered all over Crete and is widespread throughout the Med is O. pubescens. I was trying to find out whether it is an annual or a perennial but have failed so far. It seems that O. hederae is an annual which is quite common here in London.
O. pubescens is very variable, at least in colour. Most on Crete were brown or very pale though I did see at least one decent purple form. Yellowish hues are also around and combinations too. This specimen in the Vikos gorge, N Greece was quite a nice purple colour. I'm reasonably sure I have identified it correctly. The other reason this species is so widespread is that it parasitises a wide range of hosts in the Apiaceae (Umbelliferaea) and Asteraceae (Compositae) from sea level to at least 2000 metres.
« Last Edit: September 06, 2011, 07:11:05 PM by John »
John
Horticulturist, photographer, author, garden designer and plant breeder; MGS member and RHS committee member. I garden at home in SW London and also at work in South London.

Hilary

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Re: Orobanche IDd by John as O. ramosa - relatives discussed
« Reply #4 on: December 16, 2019, 02:48:01 PM »
We saw this Orobanche in May this year by the side of the road in a woody area.
Can anyone put a name to it?
MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

Hilary

  • Hero Member
Re: Orobanche IDd by John as O. ramosa - relatives discussed
« Reply #5 on: December 16, 2019, 03:21:16 PM »
Here are the photos of the plant in question
MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care