Roses - replanting

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Duncan

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Roses - replanting
« on: December 30, 2013, 05:22:13 PM »
Does anyone have any wise words on the subject of planting roses in a piece of garden previously occupied - ie within the last few months - by another rose.  I have read about planting in a cardboard box on the basis that by the time it has rotten - the mycorrhizal fungi should have gone ??  I have also just purchased some myc. fertz. from D Austen - other internet research hints that this might work.  So, I thought a combination of the two might give the new chap a fighting chance ??

Jill S

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Re: Roses - replanting
« Reply #1 on: December 30, 2013, 08:13:05 PM »
Duncan, welcome to the gardening site,
For details regarding cardboard box planting for roses have a look at Daisy's posting under 'Cardboard Boxes' in General Cultivation. Between the two attacks (box and fungus) your rose should stand a really good chance.
(in fact have a look at at Daisy's rose posts anyway, and, like the rest of us - turn a delicate shade of green)
Jill
« Last Edit: December 31, 2013, 08:26:41 AM by Alisdair »
Member of RHS and MGS. Gardens in Surrey, UK and, whenever I get the chance, on Paros, Greece where the learning curve is not the only thing that's steep.

Duncan

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Re: Roses - replanting
« Reply #2 on: December 30, 2013, 09:08:19 PM »
Paros is fab !!  I went there on hols on an MGS recommendation !!  Will now read Rosie's posts !! D.

Jill S

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Re: Roses - replanting
« Reply #3 on: December 30, 2013, 10:40:43 PM »
D, not saying Rosie's roses are not wonderful, but try 'Daisy'
(Paros is, except for Parikia in August which can be too much of a good thing)
J
Member of RHS and MGS. Gardens in Surrey, UK and, whenever I get the chance, on Paros, Greece where the learning curve is not the only thing that's steep.

Trevor Australis

  • Sr. Member
Re: Roses - replanting
« Reply #4 on: January 02, 2014, 09:24:39 AM »
Apart from the issue of nitrogen draw-down as the cardboard decomposes I'd suggest that the dead roots would still retain sufficient of the natural growth restricting aleles to make life very difficult for a new rose trying to get established. My practice is always to replace about 1 cubic metre of soil if I have to replace one rose with another. And as well I dose the planting hole with slow release fertiliser before planting and back-filling with new soil a compost.
M Land. Arch., B. Sp. Ed. Teacher, traveller and usually climate compatible.