Dianthus slow death by parts

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MikeHardman

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Dianthus slow death by parts
« on: August 02, 2011, 08:36:20 AM »
This Dianthus had been flowering very well for months, then a patch died-off, then another - so now there is just a small bit remaining. The patches seem fine, then turn straw-coloured suddenly. There are cats around, but adjacent plants (including similar Dianthus) are not affected.
I have not dug it up yet, but that will happen soon - so I may have a useful update to add (eg. to say it was vine weevil).
Meanwhile, any ideas?
Mike
Geologist by Uni training, IT consultant, Referee for Viola for Botanical Society of the British Isles, commissioned author and photographer on Viola for RHS (Enc. of Perennials, The Garden, The Plantsman).
I garden near Polis, Cyprus, 100m alt., on marl, but have gardened mainly in S.England

Paul T.

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Re: Dianthus slow death by parts
« Reply #1 on: November 24, 2011, 08:47:17 AM »
Mike,

How did this plant go?  Did it recover?  I would have been taking cuttings to make a backup plant, unless this was one of many.  I do find the same sort of occurrence here in Dianthus from time to time, and suspect root problems although I have never taken the time to investigate fully. :-\
Cheers.

Paul T.
Canberra, Australia.
Min winter temp -8 or -9°C. Max summer temp 40°C. Thankfully, maybe once or twice a year only.

David Bracey

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Re: Dianthus slow death by parts
« Reply #2 on: November 24, 2011, 09:21:36 AM »
Mike, Fusarium spp is a common disease of Dianthus but I have no idea how the symptoms look.
MGS member.

 I have gardened in sub-tropical Florida, maritime UK, continental Europe and the Mediterranean basin, France. Of the 4 I have found that the most difficult climate for gardening is the latter.

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MikeHardman

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Re: Dianthus slow death by parts
« Reply #3 on: November 24, 2011, 05:03:06 PM »
Guys, thanks for comments.
The plant is almost exactly the same (over three months on)- no better, no worse.
It is the only plant of this particular cultivar that I have, but it is of no particular value. I have been wary of taking cuttings while it is weak. But anyway, I am thinking of replanting the whole bed as several plants are not doing well in it. I'll see about some sort of rescue attempt for the Dianthus when I dig the things up. I'll update thereafter.
Mike
Geologist by Uni training, IT consultant, Referee for Viola for Botanical Society of the British Isles, commissioned author and photographer on Viola for RHS (Enc. of Perennials, The Garden, The Plantsman).
I garden near Polis, Cyprus, 100m alt., on marl, but have gardened mainly in S.England