New vegetables

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David Bracey

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Re: New vegetables
« Reply #15 on: June 10, 2013, 01:41:07 PM »
Does anyone know how it is grown............well.?
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 I have gardened in sub-tropical Florida, maritime UK, continental Europe and the Mediterranean basin, France. Of the 4 I have found that the most difficult climate for gardening is the latter.

Alice

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Re: New vegetables
« Reply #16 on: June 11, 2013, 09:00:19 AM »
Another vegetable, delicious as a boiled salad, is Salsola soda.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salsola_soda
« Last Edit: June 11, 2013, 11:05:09 AM by Alice »
Amateur gardener who has gardened in north London and now gardens part of the year on the Cycladic island of Paros. Conditions: coastal, windy, annual rainfall 350mm, temp 0-35 degrees C.

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oron peri

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Re: New vegetables
« Reply #17 on: June 11, 2013, 09:17:06 AM »
Okra [Ablemoschus esculantus] or better known as Bamya is an important summer veg. in the Eastern Mediterranea and north Africa.
It is easily grown from seeds sown either in a pot than transplented outside or directly in the ground in spring.
It needs plenty!! of sun and will not produce fruits and will become leggy if grown in shady conditions.
Plants grow to quite a big size and better planted 60cm apart.

When plants are strong enogh they do not need much water and soon they will produce beautiful, Hibiscus like yellow flowers.

Here the growers take off the larger leaves in order to 'open' the shrub so it will get more sun and will produce more brunches.

The smaller the fruits are the better they taste as maturing they will become fibery and seeds will start to get harder and not plesent to eat, there fruits are picked in mix sizes from 1cm to about 5-7cm while they are still soft.
Usually cooked in tomato souce with lots og garlic, often with meat balls or plain with ground meat.....Bon appetit
 
« Last Edit: June 11, 2013, 12:14:31 PM by oron peri »
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Living and gardening in Tivon, Lower Galilee region, North Israel.
Min temp 5c Max 42c, around 450mm rain.

David Bracey

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Re: New vegetables
« Reply #18 on: June 11, 2013, 04:46:06 PM »
Thanks Oron. I guess it does not get hot eNough in the Languedoc and being a lazy gardener I do like to grow in pots and then transplant.

Oron where is okra grown commercially? Is it mechanically harvested?
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 I have gardened in sub-tropical Florida, maritime UK, continental Europe and the Mediterranean basin, France. Of the 4 I have found that the most difficult climate for gardening is the latter.

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JTh

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Re: New vegetables
« Reply #19 on: June 11, 2013, 06:09:45 PM »
I must admit I don't like the taste of okra very much, it feels slimy, but it is a beautifyl plant, I have seen it growing in a field in Crete, it was  a small field and it was harvested manually. Since it is grown as an annual vegetable, I don't understand why you can't grow it in the Languedoc as well.

There is a link to how to grow okra in your backyard here: http://gardening.about.com/od/vegetables/p/Okra.htm.

They can be started in pots and then transplanted, just the way you like it!
Retired veterinary surgeon by training with a PhD in parasitology,  but worked as a virologist since 1992.
Member of the MGS  since 2004. Gardening in Oslo and to a limited extent in Halkidiki, Greece.

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oron peri

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Re: New vegetables
« Reply #20 on: June 12, 2013, 04:52:46 AM »
Oron where is okra grown commercially? Is it mechanically harvested?

David,
It is harvested manualy as it needs to be picked every few days during  summer, fruits are picked befor they become fibery so it is never grown in large quanteties as it demends much work.

Jorun,
In order to reduce the slime the pedicel should be cut to its end [on the fruit size] leaving the fruit  closed, than it is fried first with little amount of oil until slime has dried then you add the garlic and finely the tomato...
Garden Designer, Bulb man, Botanical tours guide.
Living and gardening in Tivon, Lower Galilee region, North Israel.
Min temp 5c Max 42c, around 450mm rain.

Alice

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Re: New vegetables
« Reply #21 on: June 12, 2013, 08:33:42 AM »
Jorun,

As Oron says, some preparation is needed before cooking to minimize sliminess:
1. Trim the hard protruding part of the conical stem end by slicing all around thinly, taking care not to slice all the way through.
2. Sprinkle with salt and vinegar and leave to stand in the sun for a couple of hours.

I can't say it is one of my favourite vegetables either.
Amateur gardener who has gardened in north London and now gardens part of the year on the Cycladic island of Paros. Conditions: coastal, windy, annual rainfall 350mm, temp 0-35 degrees C.

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JTh

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Re: New vegetables
« Reply #22 on: June 12, 2013, 08:56:24 AM »
Thanks, Oron and Alice, I guess I have to make a try again. It seems as if vinegar takes care of the slime.
Retired veterinary surgeon by training with a PhD in parasitology,  but worked as a virologist since 1992.
Member of the MGS  since 2004. Gardening in Oslo and to a limited extent in Halkidiki, Greece.

Jill S

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Re: New vegetables
« Reply #23 on: June 12, 2013, 11:45:04 AM »
I've been wondering what they would be like dipped in a chilli/tempura batter, deep fried, and then eaten with either yoghurt/lemon juice or yoghurt/mint. Will have to try, might be an answer for those that don't like them.
Member of RHS and MGS. Gardens in Surrey, UK and, whenever I get the chance, on Paros, Greece where the learning curve is not the only thing that's steep.

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Pia

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Re: New vegetables
« Reply #24 on: June 12, 2013, 02:00:36 PM »
To come back to the Asparagus:
I would very much like to harvest wild asparagus in my olivegrove.
Is it possible to grow from seed? How can I do?
Any suggestions?
Living in Denmark and part time growing olives in the coastal Peloponnese, near Kiveri, close to Nafplion. MGS member since 2010.

Hilary

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Re: New vegetables
« Reply #25 on: June 13, 2013, 12:39:39 PM »
Okra.
I came out in hives twice 40 years ago after  eating Okra.
Since then I have avoided eating, cooking, preparing or even looking at them
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Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

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JTh

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Re: New vegetables
« Reply #26 on: June 13, 2013, 02:53:28 PM »
Pia, there is a company selling seeds (http://www.magicgardenseeds.com/seite?wg=4044), it seems to be easy to propagate:

Growing instructions
An easily grown plant. Ppre-soak the seeds for 12 hours in warm water. Sow out in spring and prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle. Plant them out into their permanent positions in early summer.

I don't know if the plant is easily transplanted from the wild, they grow abundantly where we are, including in my garden.
Retired veterinary surgeon by training with a PhD in parasitology,  but worked as a virologist since 1992.
Member of the MGS  since 2004. Gardening in Oslo and to a limited extent in Halkidiki, Greece.

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Pia

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Re: New vegetables
« Reply #27 on: July 08, 2013, 10:49:18 AM »
Thank you so much! I am looking forward to trying it next spring. Kind regards Pia
Living in Denmark and part time growing olives in the coastal Peloponnese, near Kiveri, close to Nafplion. MGS member since 2010.

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Speedy

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Re: New vegetables
« Reply #28 on: September 18, 2014, 11:59:37 AM »
I like the idea of a 'new' or ' unusual vegetables' thread,
so I'll put my two bobs worth in and bump it back up again.

 Re. Asparagus transplanted from the wild... Yes it transplants easily when  plant is dormant.
Dig and replant the crowns in soil prepared in the normal way for asparagus ... It will live for many years.
When I dug mine  I chose male plants (no red berries) for two reasons.
I'd rather not have them growing new plants in my garden
 and I've heard that male plants are more productive because the don't divert energy to seed production.
I don't know if it's just a myth or not , but the first reason is good enough for me.

I like to pick and eat weeds from my garden
Tonight we had bladder campion (Silene vulgaris) spring shoot along with
unopened salsify (Tragopogon porriferus) flower buds lightly boiled or even just blanched
and then dressed with oil and lemon juice.
We often eat it when it's up and growing .
Also , purselane (Portulaca oleracea) in the summer,
as well as wild rocket (Diplotaxis tenuifolia)
They're all naturalised in my orchard and around the vege patch.
Others , nettles , perennial and annual (Urticaria dioecia and U.minuta)
as well as Alexanders (Smyrnium olusatrum) are also eaten.
Fat hen (Chenopodium album) , huazontle (Chenopodium sp.)  and
 quelite , another Chenopodium sp. from Mexico)are good cooked they volunteer in my garden.
Tomatillos (Physalis ixocarpa) come up every year in my orchard and are great for salsa.
Carrots, parsnips, chicory and lettuce, though not really new or unusual, also self seed here.
Epazote (Chenopodium ambrosioides) pops up around the garden and
I use it as a flavouring herb for Mexican food.
It's all food I don't have to purposefully cultivate.  :)
« Last Edit: September 18, 2014, 01:26:34 PM by Speedy »
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Trevor Australis

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Re: New vegetables
« Reply #29 on: October 21, 2014, 11:36:06 PM »
A long time ago when I worked as a jobbing gardener on weekends to earn extra cash I was chastised very severely by my Lebanese employees for pulling up 'acres' of portulaca they allowed to smother their expensive designer garden: they ate it! I was stunned by their anger (well, the granny's tirade) and by the idea of eating not only weeds but such bizarre looking 'food'. How I have changed.
M Land. Arch., B. Sp. Ed. Teacher, traveller and usually climate compatible.