Frangipani

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Fleur Pavlidis

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Re: Frangipani
« Reply #15 on: July 11, 2012, 09:27:51 PM »
Pamela, and anyone else who wants to correct a mistake in one of their posts - you can do so at any time by clicking on Modify at the top of your post, making the change and them clicking on Save at the bottom. The Moderators will try to keep a check on plants names and correct the spelling if necessary.
MGS member, Greece. I garden in Attica, Greece and Mt Goulinas (450m) Central Greece

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MikeHardman

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Re: Frangipani (Plumeria)
« Reply #16 on: July 30, 2017, 11:38:14 PM »
To add a bit more to these accumulating notes on Frangipani...

Last year, I bought a deep pink one.
I dug a large hole, spiked the bottom, filled with a good mix of native soil (mainly mineral) and bought compost (mainly organic), mulched with gravel, kept irrigated.
Result...
It has been trying to open a few flowers, and the leaf buds have expanded a bit, but it is still (at the end of July) almost bare. See photos.

I presume my irrigation is insufficient (I don't want to disturb the roots by doing much excavation to find out); I shall increase it (and hope the problem was not over-watering).
...Unless somebody tells me otherwise...

I hope to be able to post photos showing its revival!

Mike
Mike
Geologist by Uni training, IT consultant, Referee for Viola for Botanical Society of the British Isles, commissioned author and photographer on Viola for RHS (Enc. of Perennials, The Garden, The Plantsman).
I garden near Polis, Cyprus, 100m alt., on marl, but have gardened mainly in S.England

Joanna Savage

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Re: Frangipani
« Reply #17 on: July 31, 2017, 01:25:45 PM »
Hello Mike, I wonder if the problem might be low relative humidity. I think of frangipani as being tropical or subtropical shrubs and trees thriving in humid conditions.
Incidentally , when wondering if there is a connection between the French almond tart, frangipane, and the frangipani plant, I read that there was a French Marquis Frangipane, a perfumier. The newly described Frangipani had such a beautiful scent it was named after him.

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John J

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Re: Frangipani
« Reply #18 on: July 31, 2017, 06:01:07 PM »
Mike, Joanna has a point, also you may find that they like the conditions to be slightly acidic. I don't know what your winter conditions are like but they won't stand frost or cold and wet for very long, especially if the soil isn't free draining.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

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MikeHardman

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Re: Frangipani
« Reply #19 on: July 31, 2017, 08:09:48 PM »
Thanks both.

The plant got blasted by cold over winter, but it seems suprisingly intact, at least above ground.
Humidity: well like many plants in Cyprus in summer, it gets a daily roasting in a fan-assisted oven. The thing is ... look at those young leaves. There is no sign of distress, apart from being late/slow to emerge.
Freeness of drainage is tricky to answer. The soil is a variably-pebbly marl, quite well compacted in this spot. There is a chance that the planting hole I dug is something of a sump. But, again, if it is waterlogged down below, I'd expect to see some sign of distress in the leaves. There is a possibility, however, that it was waterlogged for a while over autumn-spring, causing its roots to rot, and now its growth could be curtailed by that.

I appreciate your thoughts.

Further on names...
Plumeria is named after Charles Plumier, royal botanist to King Louis XIV of France. Although not mentioned much these days, in his time he was an important contributor to botanical knowledge (he discovered Fuchsia and was prodigious in his works), as elucidated here
- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Plumier

Mike
Mike
Geologist by Uni training, IT consultant, Referee for Viola for Botanical Society of the British Isles, commissioned author and photographer on Viola for RHS (Enc. of Perennials, The Garden, The Plantsman).
I garden near Polis, Cyprus, 100m alt., on marl, but have gardened mainly in S.England

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John J

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Re: Frangipani
« Reply #20 on: August 01, 2017, 01:24:51 PM »
Mike, the first photo is of our small Frangipani. It's in full sun during the first part of the day so I have planted ground cover under it to try to help keep its roots cooler. The second photo is of a successful cutting from it. The ones that were watered regularly all rotted with the first signs being a softening of the stem before they succumbed completely. This one was watered in well and then left to dry out before being watered again, and so on.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

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MikeHardman

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Re: Frangipani
« Reply #21 on: August 28, 2017, 09:26:42 PM »
Thanks John; good to know.

My plant has, at last, perked up - more flowers, and leaves expanding.
Hopefully it will get into gear and make some new wood before it shuts down for winter.

Mike
Mike
Geologist by Uni training, IT consultant, Referee for Viola for Botanical Society of the British Isles, commissioned author and photographer on Viola for RHS (Enc. of Perennials, The Garden, The Plantsman).
I garden near Polis, Cyprus, 100m alt., on marl, but have gardened mainly in S.England