Yucca

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gertrude

  • Jr. Member
Yucca
« on: April 27, 2012, 03:01:40 PM »
At the beginning of last Autumn.  we planted out into the garden, from a pot, a mature Yucca.  Three weeks of a metre and a half of snow this winter have done its worst and it now looks rather 'YUK' to say the least.  All the top leaves, apart from the growing tip are damaged and have been whitened. Never having grown a Yucca before,  I am wondering,  if I cut it down to the better part of the lower  stem,  will it sprout from here and continue to grow ?  Any help or advice would be very welcome.
Pete and Jan. Retired 15 years ago and moved to Le Marche, Italy for the peace and quiet of the countryside and more sunshine, where gardening became a challenge.  We now have a lovely garden with an eclectic selection of plants including many wild flowers of which we are found of..

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Alisdair

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
Re: Yucca
« Reply #1 on: April 28, 2012, 07:18:31 AM »
What we have done in Greece in similar circumstances is leave the growing tip, but remove the damaged leaves. In the kinder weather now the tip should regrow happily, but you will probably find new shoots developing much lower down. When that happens with us, once these new shoots are developing strongly, we cut down the old main stem above them - unless the old main stem has recovered enough to look really presentable, instead of miserable!
When you do cut down the old stem, you'll be surprised at how heavy it is - I think heavier than a woody tree of the same size.
Alisdair Aird
Gardens in SE England (Sussex); also coastal Southern Greece, and (in a very small way) South West France; MGS member (and former president); vice chairman RHS Lily Group, past chairman Cyclamen Society

Guenther

  • Newbie
Re: Yucca
« Reply #2 on: September 26, 2012, 10:39:34 PM »
The best way to make a yucca „new“ ist to plant it out into the garden , then cut down the old stem and handle it like a normal yucca in a pot  (water them regularly). After few months you find about 3 to 5 new shoots at the stem. Cut them off, except of one or two. If your plant have 3 stems, cut them in different heights.
Garden designer in pension, garden photographer. I have a garden (1200 square meter) at Wels, Austria and I passionately attend a garden on the island of Losinj, Croatia.

Trevor Australis

  • Sr. Member
Re: Yucca
« Reply #3 on: January 08, 2013, 08:29:43 AM »
Do you know what species it is? Some from Guatemala, the really huge multi-branching kinds are like trees but very cold tender and rot from the inside out. This kind has stiff, waxy leaves about 60cm long x 7cm wide and can grow up to 10m tall. There are three or for variegated forms, mostly derived from Dutch green-house growers, even those sold in Australia. The nurseries like these because they are dead easy to propagate in a heated European greenhouse. The big branches can be cut up onto short sectiosn and rooted standing up, thus making tall indoor plants for northern Europe. The trunk sections van also be split in half vertically and rooted lying down on potting mix. This produced heaps of smaller plants that can be potted on and sold quickly.

There are other Yuccas from the SW USA that must be grown from seed, a much slower business, and the seeds harder to get and expensive too. This region is where the cold hardy Yuccas come from; the ones that withstand snow and blizzards every year. As a general indicator these Yuccas have very narrow silver leaves. Some make trunks (the Joshua Tree) and some do not. All are lovely but tend to grow slowly whereas the Tropical ones are much faster.
M Land. Arch., B. Sp. Ed. Teacher, traveller and usually climate compatible.

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gertrude

  • Jr. Member
Yuka, tree or not ?
« Reply #4 on: October 13, 2016, 07:27:14 PM »
We have a yuka in the garden which is nearly 2.5 meters tall and it has NEVER flowered.  Are there varieties that dont flower?  Its frustrating as we see little bits of yukas obviously not looked after with wonderful flowering spikes.  Any advice would be welcome. 
Pete and Jan. Retired 15 years ago and moved to Le Marche, Italy for the peace and quiet of the countryside and more sunshine, where gardening became a challenge.  We now have a lovely garden with an eclectic selection of plants including many wild flowers of which we are found of..

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JTh

  • Hero Member
Re: Yuka, tree or not ?
« Reply #5 on: October 13, 2016, 09:58:55 PM »
I have the same problem, Jan, although my yucca is not quite as big as yours. I really hope somebody could give us some advice here.
Retired veterinary surgeon by training with a PhD in parasitology,  but worked as virologist since 1992.
Member of the MGS and Branch website editor. Gardening in Oslo and to a limited extent in Halkidiki, Greece.

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Alisdair

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
Re: Yuka, tree or not ?
« Reply #6 on: October 14, 2016, 08:49:53 AM »
I can't really help, but for what it's worth our own yucca in southern Greece which flowers every year is planted close to the south-facing stone front of our verandah so gets lots of reflected heat. It gets no watering whatsoever. When after a few years a stem starts to get unsightly (poor leaves on part of it) I saw it off as close to the base as I can, and am always amazed at the weight of the stem, heavier than most normal wood - the plant must have an amazing ability to suck water up and retain it.
Alisdair Aird
Gardens in SE England (Sussex); also coastal Southern Greece, and (in a very small way) South West France; MGS member (and former president); vice chairman RHS Lily Group, past chairman Cyclamen Society

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gertrude

  • Jr. Member
Re: Yucca
« Reply #7 on: October 17, 2016, 08:28:01 AM »
I think I would be reluctant to saw it off as its such a lovely plant, shape etc.   and it protects my Euphorbia dendroides  Are there non-flowering types??  A few years ago it lost all its leaves in a severe winter, but all grew back beautifully, do you think this may have something to do with it?
Pete and Jan. Retired 15 years ago and moved to Le Marche, Italy for the peace and quiet of the countryside and more sunshine, where gardening became a challenge.  We now have a lovely garden with an eclectic selection of plants including many wild flowers of which we are found of..

Trevor Australis

  • Sr. Member
Re: Yucca
« Reply #8 on: August 01, 2018, 10:44:31 AM »
All Yuccas should flower - when mature, and when the conditions are right. The big kinds, such as Yucca guatamalensis, tend to take 7 yrs or longer to produce the short, stubby flower stalks - these generally tend to come from Central America where conditions are warm wet and Tropical. I suspect flowers are initiated by temperature. Joshua Trees which are also very tall, come from the SW of the USA, concentrated in Texas and Arizona where winters are very cold and snowy. Flowers in this plant appear when the weather warms in Spring.  Guatamalensis is easily propagated by big cuttings/ truncheons which can be 2m long and more; they are much preferred by Dutch greenhouse growers as they can turn out a truck load of sale-able plants in a matter of months. Joshua Trees can only be grown from seed, so far as I know. They are very slow to get started.
M Land. Arch., B. Sp. Ed. Teacher, traveller and usually climate compatible.

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gertrude

  • Jr. Member
Re: Yucca
« Reply #9 on: September 21, 2018, 01:40:08 PM »
.........Two years later, and 15 years since we inherited the non flowering Yucca,  we stopped dead in our tracks, after returning from holiday to see not one flower on he Yucca but several.  Everything comes to those who wait !!!
Pete and Jan. Retired 15 years ago and moved to Le Marche, Italy for the peace and quiet of the countryside and more sunshine, where gardening became a challenge.  We now have a lovely garden with an eclectic selection of plants including many wild flowers of which we are found of..