Plant associations

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Daisy

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Re: Plant associations
« Reply #30 on: September 01, 2012, 08:13:31 AM »
Here are a few more associations I like.





A young Sedum telephium atropurpureum with petunias, a few weeks ago and this morning.





Verbena x hybrida and a purple sage.



Tradescantia pallida purpurea with a scarlet pelargonium.



Orange flowers from an unknown succulent in front of a terracotta pot.





Bright coloured petunias growing through Dichondra Silver Falls

Daisy :)
Amateur gardener, who has gardened in Surrey and Cornwall, England, but now has a tiny garden facing north west, near the coast in north east Crete. It is 300 meters above sea level. On a steep learning curve!!! Member of both MGS and RHS

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ritamax

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Re: Plant associations
« Reply #31 on: September 01, 2012, 04:35:24 PM »
Beautiful, Daisy, wonderful colours!!!
The unknown succulent is Echeveria secunda. Oron recognized it for me a while ago in the Plant identifications' section.
Hobbygardener (MGS member) with a rooftop garden in Basel and a garden on heavy clay with sand 600m from seaside in Costa Blanca South (precipitation 300mm), learning to garden waterwise

Daisy

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Re: Plant associations
« Reply #32 on: September 06, 2012, 08:05:03 AM »
Thanks ritamax. I guessed it was an Echeveria, but wasn't sure which one.
Daisy :)
Amateur gardener, who has gardened in Surrey and Cornwall, England, but now has a tiny garden facing north west, near the coast in north east Crete. It is 300 meters above sea level. On a steep learning curve!!! Member of both MGS and RHS

Umbrian

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Re: Plant associations
« Reply #33 on: September 21, 2012, 06:49:03 AM »
For the first time since I planted them, quite a few years ago, my Sedum spectabile have performed well this year, one plant spreading and growing through a nearby Caryopteris and making a lovey combination of colours and form. :) I have always considered that patience is a necessary virtue in a gardener and in this case have been rewarded. Many a time I have been tempted to get rid of the Sedums as they looked so sickly but now they have come up trumps for me ;D
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.

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Fleur Pavlidis

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Re: Plant associations
« Reply #34 on: September 21, 2012, 08:56:03 AM »
What a lovely colour combination. My Sedum spectabile has always been chewed to the stem, I think by little snails, and the coffee grout remedy didn't work at protecting it. I wonder if growing it through something strong smelling might be the answer.
MGS member, Greece. I garden in Attica, Greece and Mt Goulinas (450m) Central Greece

Jill S

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Re: Plant associations
« Reply #35 on: September 21, 2012, 09:56:21 AM »
Might not be snails. All my sedums here in the UK are a fav food item for my grazing tortoise, they get chomped to the ground and never get much chance to flower. I think the only answer for me is to pot them out of his reach, but being really lazy that hasn't happened. Yet!
Member of RHS and MGS. Gardens in Surrey, UK and, whenever I get the chance, on Paros, Greece where the learning curve is not the only thing that's steep.

Daisy

  • Sr. Member
Re: Plant associations
« Reply #36 on: September 26, 2012, 09:10:28 AM »
That is a beautiful combination Umbrian.
My Sedum spectabile has a, now, sparse flowering Gaura lindheimeri behind it. I wish I had given it a Chelsea chop earlier in the season. It would look a lot better now.
One elsewhere in the garden, that I did chop back earlier in the season, has responded brilliantly.
My sedums, are ignored by the snails. In fact there are a few young seedlings turned up too.
Daisy :)
Amateur gardener, who has gardened in Surrey and Cornwall, England, but now has a tiny garden facing north west, near the coast in north east Crete. It is 300 meters above sea level. On a steep learning curve!!! Member of both MGS and RHS

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Fleur Pavlidis

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Re: Plant associations
« Reply #37 on: September 26, 2012, 08:43:26 PM »
You may well be right, Jill. I do often see tortoises in that part of the garden, click clacking along the cement road. I thought they were on the way to the fallen figs, but the sedum could be a tasty raodside snack.
MGS member, Greece. I garden in Attica, Greece and Mt Goulinas (450m) Central Greece

Umbrian

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Re: Plant associations
« Reply #38 on: September 27, 2012, 03:57:47 PM »
What a difference rain can make after long weeks of drought. My Salvia microphylla and Ceratostigma plumbaginoides ( amongst other things) have suddenly recovered themselves in flowers reminding me how beautiful a Mediterranean garden can be in the autumn. Here a red salvia with the Ceratostigma, Nearby I have a deep pink salvia with prostrate rosemary in flower beneath it .
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.

Daisy

  • Sr. Member
Re: Plant associations
« Reply #39 on: May 23, 2013, 02:33:52 PM »
Here are a few more associations in my garden.


april 2013 112 by Daisyincrete, on Flickr
Oranges and orange abutilon.


april 2013 127 by Daisyincrete, on Flickr
Rose Golden Celebration and a callistemon


april 2013 120 by Daisyincrete, on Flickr
Salvia and an argyranthemum.


april-may 2013 037 by Daisyincrete, on Flickr
Rose Colombian Climber and an ivy-leaf pelargonium.


may 2013 008 by Daisyincrete, on Flickr
Miscanthus sinensis Morning Light with Nigella damascena.


may 2013 029 by Daisyincrete, on Flickr
Iris louisiana Black Gamecock and Convolvulus sabatius.


may 2013 036 by Daisyincrete, on Flickr
An unintended association. Lychnis coronaria and Geum Mrs Bradshaw.
Doesn't it make your eyes hurt!


may 2013 153 by Daisyincrete, on Flickr
Argyranthemum Jamaica Primrose with Miscanthus Cosmopolitan.
Daisy :)
Amateur gardener, who has gardened in Surrey and Cornwall, England, but now has a tiny garden facing north west, near the coast in north east Crete. It is 300 meters above sea level. On a steep learning curve!!! Member of both MGS and RHS

Daisy

  • Sr. Member
Re: Plant associations
« Reply #40 on: July 12, 2013, 01:49:33 PM »

015 by Daisyincrete, on Flickr

I like these two soft blues together; Convolvulus mauritanicus and Lavendula dentata.
There are a few deep blue petunias further along too, shown in this earlier photo.


2013 073 by Daisyincrete, on Flickr


2013 076 by Daisyincrete, on Flickr

More soft colours together, pink this time. Rose Blush Noisette with an argyranthemum.


july 2013 038 by Daisyincrete, on Flickr

This Fuchsia triphylla or hybrid was given to me as a cutting by a neighbour. It has flowered continuously since 2011. This year, it has a self sown verbascum as company.


048 by Daisyincrete, on Flickr

I posted a photo of these cosmos under the annuals heading, but as a plant association, I love these two together.


july 2013 058 by Daisyincrete, on Flickr

Dahlia Arabian Nights with Crocosmia Lucifer.
These two are blooming together now. They are next to Rose Lady Emma Hamilton which also goes well with them. But I cannot get a photo of all three together, without standing in the bed and becoming a contortionist! :o :o :o
Daisy :)
Amateur gardener, who has gardened in Surrey and Cornwall, England, but now has a tiny garden facing north west, near the coast in north east Crete. It is 300 meters above sea level. On a steep learning curve!!! Member of both MGS and RHS

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KatG

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Re: Plant associations
« Reply #41 on: November 27, 2013, 06:15:35 PM »
Hasn't been much action on the topic for a while, but here's a selection of miscellaneous plant combinations.
Apropos yellow - it works pretty well in nature! I think the trick is to balance it with greys and greens.
Katerina Georgi. Interior designer and Garden designer. Has lived, worked and gardened in the southern Peloponnese for the last 26 years. MGS member and head of MGS Peloponnese Branch.

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Fleur Pavlidis

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Re: Plant associations
« Reply #42 on: November 28, 2013, 09:08:23 PM »
Lovely plantings and marvellous rocks.
MGS member, Greece. I garden in Attica, Greece and Mt Goulinas (450m) Central Greece

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KatG

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Re: Plant associations
« Reply #43 on: December 01, 2013, 05:29:33 PM »
Nobody has pointed out the mistake in picture no. 5 - it should be Phlomis and Iris.
Katerina Georgi. Interior designer and Garden designer. Has lived, worked and gardened in the southern Peloponnese for the last 26 years. MGS member and head of MGS Peloponnese Branch.

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JTh

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Re: Plant associations
« Reply #44 on: December 01, 2013, 08:40:20 PM »
Which shows that we see what we believe we see, which was what you told us.
Retired veterinary surgeon by training with a PhD in parasitology,  but worked as a virologist since 1992.
Member of the MGS  since 2004. Gardening in Oslo and to a limited extent in Halkidiki, Greece.