Plant associations

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Bolanthus

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Re: Plant associations
« Reply #15 on: June 29, 2012, 11:44:21 PM »
Thanks  ;D ;D
Aris Zografidis
A lot of interest for the mediterranean flora and for the water wise gardening –but no garden yet. 
my blog on Greek Flora: ROSA SEMPERVIRENS

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John

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Re: Plant associations
« Reply #16 on: July 07, 2012, 10:25:45 PM »
I had the privilege of visiting Daisy's garden this spring and saw some of these plants in flower then. Along with the others with me we had a lovely couple of hours seeing the garden and sitting in what seemed to be a quite sheltered location with a view down to the sea. Thanks again.
The Lavandula is L. dentata by the way.
John
Horticulturist, photographer, author, garden designer and plant breeder; MGS member and RHS committee member. I garden at home in SW London and also at work in South London.

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John

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Re: Plant associations
« Reply #17 on: July 07, 2012, 10:33:16 PM »
Regarding Digitalis purpurea. This is a species native to a wide range of Europe including Madeira where it could vaguely be considered at least bordering the Mediterranean as much of Macronesia is included in the Mediterranean. Though I have to admit there is a considerable difference between the climate of Madeira and eastern Crete!
John
Horticulturist, photographer, author, garden designer and plant breeder; MGS member and RHS committee member. I garden at home in SW London and also at work in South London.

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Spark

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Re: Plant associations
« Reply #18 on: July 11, 2012, 02:08:38 PM »
This is the first time I post in the forum (sorry for my English).
Associations plant is one of my favourite practice.
Let me show you one of my experience

The Fairy roses with Convolvulus cneorum
amateur gardener - MGS member & RHS member
"always learning about how design my own mediterranean garden"

Umbrian

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Re: Plant associations
« Reply #19 on: July 11, 2012, 04:37:13 PM »
 :)Lovely! welcome and don't worry about your English - gardeners have a way of understanding each other I think!
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.

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Alisdair

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Re: Plant associations
« Reply #20 on: July 11, 2012, 06:49:23 PM »
How beautifully they go together, Spark - and welcome! As Umbrian says, gardeners always understand other gardeners  :)
Alisdair Aird
Gardens in SE England (Sussex); also coastal Southern Greece, and (in a very small way) South West France; MGS member (and former president); vice chairman RHS Lily Group, past chairman Cyclamen Society

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MikeHardman

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Re: Plant associations
« Reply #21 on: July 11, 2012, 09:08:29 PM »
Welcome Spark. That works a treat!

Please (if you don't mind) put your location(s) in your 'signature'; knowing where you garden really makes a difference to our understanding and interpretation of your posts. Thank you.
« Last Edit: July 11, 2012, 09:10:47 PM by MikeHardman »
Mike
Geologist by Uni training, IT consultant, Referee for Viola for Botanical Society of the British Isles, commissioned author and photographer on Viola for RHS (Enc. of Perennials, The Garden, The Plantsman).
I garden near Polis, Cyprus, 100m alt., on marl, but have gardened mainly in S.England

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ritamax

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Re: Plant associations
« Reply #22 on: August 14, 2012, 11:40:02 AM »
A very nice combination I saw in a park in Perpignan!
Hobbygardener (MGS member) with a rooftop garden in Basel and a garden on heavy clay with sand 600m from seaside in Costa Blanca South (precipitation 300mm), learning to garden waterwise

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MikeHardman

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Re: Plant associations - Lantana camara and Plumbago auriculata
« Reply #23 on: August 14, 2012, 09:46:01 PM »
Here's a yellow Lantana camara and pale blue Plumbago auriculata growing amicably together in my garden. While they are very different colours, there is something sympathetic about them that I like.
Mike
Geologist by Uni training, IT consultant, Referee for Viola for Botanical Society of the British Isles, commissioned author and photographer on Viola for RHS (Enc. of Perennials, The Garden, The Plantsman).
I garden near Polis, Cyprus, 100m alt., on marl, but have gardened mainly in S.England

Umbrian

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Re: Plant associations
« Reply #24 on: August 15, 2012, 07:33:48 AM »
Lovely Mike, I particularly like yellow and white combinations. This year I set a large planter with Lantana and Bidens. The Lantana is still going strong but the bidens surprisingle has rather given up the ghost. It is a larger flowered variety to the one I normally use and doesn't seem to have the same staying power. ???
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.

David Bracey

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Re: Plant associations
« Reply #25 on: August 15, 2012, 03:26:54 PM »
I  think that yellow is one of the most difficult colours. White, yes but other colours uggggggggggh.  It is a real mediterranean colour and plants well with other yellow hues and oranges but to my mind , not much else.
MGS member.

 I have gardened in sub-tropical Florida, maritime UK, continental Europe and the Mediterranean basin, France. Of the 4 I have found that the most difficult climate for gardening is the latter.

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JTh

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Re: Plant associations
« Reply #26 on: August 15, 2012, 08:28:24 PM »
I agree with you, yellow is the most difficult colour in the garden, and not among my favourites.
Retired veterinary surgeon by training with a PhD in parasitology,  but worked as a virologist since 1992.
Member of the MGS  since 2004. Gardening in Oslo and to a limited extent in Halkidiki, Greece.

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ritamax

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Re: Plant associations
« Reply #27 on: August 15, 2012, 10:03:52 PM »
I didn't like yellow at all, but my husband keeps on insisting on yellow flowers, and they can really brighten up many corners. And yellows do go well with oranges, reds and browns! And pollinators like yellow, too!
Hobbygardener (MGS member) with a rooftop garden in Basel and a garden on heavy clay with sand 600m from seaside in Costa Blanca South (precipitation 300mm), learning to garden waterwise

Umbrian

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Re: Plant associations
« Reply #28 on: August 16, 2012, 06:34:21 AM »
Colour associations are really a matter of personal taste and what is beautiful to one eye can be jarring to another. I love yellow flowers - for me they are "happy"  ;D and brighten both my spirits and areas that otherwise would be subdued. Yellow and purple work well I think (think of the yellow centres of purple solanum for example). Also many yellow subjects are, to put it in simple terms, members of the "daisy" family and their form also makes me think of happy smiling faces. This year a self sown, 7/8ft multi branched sunflower is brightening up the approach to our swimming pool and never fails to make me smile when I pass it especially when most of the subjects around it are getting browner by the day due to lack of rain and searing temperatures.
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.

Alice

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Re: Plant associations
« Reply #29 on: August 16, 2012, 03:08:39 PM »
I agree with you, Umbrian. Yellow is a bright happy colour and I find it combines well with most colours apart from the pink hues. And, as you say, it is a matter of personal taste. De gustibus et coloribus non disputandum est.
Amateur gardener who has gardened in north London and now gardens part of the year on the Cycladic island of Paros. Conditions: coastal, windy, annual rainfall 350mm, temp 0-35 degrees C.