kumquat

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MikeHardman

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kumquat
« on: January 18, 2012, 06:14:13 PM »
Its only a little one, but it has gorgeous fruit;
we're very fond of it;
the fruit are of just the right size - such that one is not quite enough!
Mike
Geologist by Uni training, IT consultant, Referee for Viola for Botanical Society of the British Isles, commissioned author and photographer on Viola for RHS (Enc. of Perennials, The Garden, The Plantsman).
I garden near Polis, Cyprus, 100m alt., on marl, but have gardened mainly in S.England

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John

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Re: kumquat
« Reply #1 on: January 18, 2012, 06:59:02 PM »
It looks very healthy. Do you only eat them raw or cook with them as well?
John
Horticulturist, photographer, author, garden designer and plant breeder; MGS member and RHS committee member. I garden at home in SW London and also at work in South London.

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MikeHardman

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Re: kumquat
« Reply #2 on: January 18, 2012, 08:56:16 PM »
Ah - you can't see the citrus leaf miner!
I'm starting to wonder if I shouldn't be referring to that as CLM, much as I refer to red spider mite as RSM. A sign of familiarity, albeit unfortunate. (RSM was a persistent problem for me growing violets and pansies under glass when I lived in England.)

We only eat them raw. Never thought of cooking with them, but thanks for the idea. These ones are not tart; they are just perfectly sweet/acid.
Mike
Geologist by Uni training, IT consultant, Referee for Viola for Botanical Society of the British Isles, commissioned author and photographer on Viola for RHS (Enc. of Perennials, The Garden, The Plantsman).
I garden near Polis, Cyprus, 100m alt., on marl, but have gardened mainly in S.England

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John

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Re: kumquat
« Reply #3 on: January 18, 2012, 11:04:19 PM »
Probably nice with some sort of salad. Much in the same way as I like to use bought strawberries when they are quite hard and not very sweet, they are lovely sliced with fresh young spinach and a balsamic vinegar dressing.
John
Horticulturist, photographer, author, garden designer and plant breeder; MGS member and RHS committee member. I garden at home in SW London and also at work in South London.

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JTh

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Re: kumquat
« Reply #4 on: January 18, 2012, 11:33:03 PM »
I planted a kumquat in Halkidiki some years ago, but it did not survive, it was probably too exposed and windy. It was grafted on a Seville orange tree, however, which survived, my friendly neighbour pruned into a very nice shape. The tree is still quite small, but healthy, and produces oranges that are perfect for a very tasty marmelade. It would have been nice to have a kumquat, but I am very pleased with what I got.
« Last Edit: January 19, 2012, 12:05:14 AM by JTh »
Retired veterinary surgeon by training with a PhD in parasitology,  but worked as a virologist since 1992.
Member of the MGS  since 2004. Gardening in Oslo and to a limited extent in Halkidiki, Greece.

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John

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Re: kumquat
« Reply #5 on: January 18, 2012, 11:50:11 PM »
I have seen a good range of Citrus fruits on Crete including occasionally kumquats though generally on the north side in more sheltered sites. Oranges are very common at low altitudes in the north west of Crete south of Platanias.
Here in London in sheltered gardens nearer to the centre lemons do quite well and produce fruit though most probably Meyer's lemon.
John
Horticulturist, photographer, author, garden designer and plant breeder; MGS member and RHS committee member. I garden at home in SW London and also at work in South London.

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Alisdair

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Re: kumquat
« Reply #6 on: January 19, 2012, 08:10:52 AM »
I have a good recipe for crystalising kumquats (I've used it for fruits from our own tree a couple of times), but it does involve boiling in the syrup you make day after day for a couple of weeks so is quite laborious. If anyone wants it email me - but I shan't be able to send it as it's at home in England, and we're in Greece at the moment.
Alisdair Aird
Gardens in SE England (Sussex); also coastal Southern Greece, and (in a very small way) South West France; MGS member (and former president); vice chairman RHS Lily Group, past chairman Cyclamen Society

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MikeHardman

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Re: kumquat
« Reply #7 on: January 19, 2012, 08:36:20 AM »
all good stuff - thanks for the comments!
Mike
Geologist by Uni training, IT consultant, Referee for Viola for Botanical Society of the British Isles, commissioned author and photographer on Viola for RHS (Enc. of Perennials, The Garden, The Plantsman).
I garden near Polis, Cyprus, 100m alt., on marl, but have gardened mainly in S.England

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Ina

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Re: kumquat
« Reply #8 on: January 19, 2012, 09:08:55 AM »
I don't have a Kumquat tree but my boyfriend has a dwarf one on his veranda. He usually makes them in syrup. As far as I remember you need to cange the water every 8-9 hours for 3 days and then you need you to boil them with the syrup. If anyone wants I can send the recipe. In Corfu where they traditionally grow Kumquats they make a nice liquer as well!!
I live in the west of Greece and have a small garden. I love flowers but I have few in my garden. I usually take pictures of flowers when I hike. I started making a blog with the flora that I see on my trips.

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JTh

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Re: kumquat
« Reply #9 on: January 19, 2012, 09:51:01 AM »
I used to have  kumquat in a pot in Norway, and once I made a very nice liqueur as well, I added a few coffe beans while the fruits were soaking in alcohol.
Retired veterinary surgeon by training with a PhD in parasitology,  but worked as a virologist since 1992.
Member of the MGS  since 2004. Gardening in Oslo and to a limited extent in Halkidiki, Greece.

Sandra

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Re: kumquat
« Reply #10 on: January 19, 2012, 09:52:23 AM »
Kumquats make the most delicious marmalade and it's really worth trying. It's easy to make as there's no need to remove the pips and pith unless you're very, very fussy! I always add extra lemons to my marmalade as I like it to zing and if your kumquats are on the sweet side this is certainly worth doing to make sure it doesn't become overly sweet.
Sandra Panting
I garden in the Southern Peloponnese, Greece and will soon be creating a small garden in Northampton, England.  I'm co-head of the MGS Peloponnese group and a member of the RHS.

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John

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Re: kumquat
« Reply #11 on: January 19, 2012, 10:01:33 AM »
I think there are a few of you here that can post recipes, even when you get home Alisdair.
John
Horticulturist, photographer, author, garden designer and plant breeder; MGS member and RHS committee member. I garden at home in SW London and also at work in South London.