Centaurea

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Alisdair

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Centaurea
« on: December 30, 2011, 11:34:11 AM »
We saw this in April 2010 on the MGS trip to the foothills of the Lycian Taurus mountains, in south west Turkey. It was identified there as Centaurea reuteriana (or reuterana as there is some disagreement in the literature about the spelling), but The Plant List has followed IPNI in reclassifying it as Cyanea reuterana. Either way, itís an interesting centaurea with soft felty leaves, unfortunately rather swamped here in the other vegetation. Itís endemic to Turkey, and a threatened species. I donít think itís in cultivation.
« Last Edit: December 19, 2018, 12:11:49 AM by Fleur Pavlidis »
Alisdair Aird
Gardens in SE England (Sussex); also coastal Southern Greece, and (in a very small way) South West France; MGS member (and former president); vice chairman RHS Lily Group, past chairman Cyclamen Society

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Fermi

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Re: Centaurea
« Reply #1 on: December 10, 2018, 12:48:12 PM »
Sorry to resurrect an old thread but I was surprised there weren't more cornflowers popping up on the forum!
This is one we got during the winter as a dormant plant in a pot and were thrilled to see it come into bloom from rather intriguing buds.
The name on the label is Centaurea phrygia but I wonder if it's actually ssp pseudophrygia
cheers
fermi
Mr F de Sousa, Central Victoria, Australia
member of AGS, SRGC, NARGS
working as a physio to support my gardening habit!

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Alisdair

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Re: Centaurea
« Reply #2 on: December 11, 2018, 10:00:59 AM »
Lovely seedheads!
Alisdair Aird
Gardens in SE England (Sussex); also coastal Southern Greece, and (in a very small way) South West France; MGS member (and former president); vice chairman RHS Lily Group, past chairman Cyclamen Society

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Alisdair

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Centaurea bella
« Reply #3 on: December 11, 2018, 10:35:51 AM »
Fermi, This is a picture I took in April 2011 of one of several seed-grown Centaurea bella (from Turkey), which we'd planted I think the year before in our dry hot garden in southern Greece. Since planting they've never been watered, and thrive, flowering for the first few months each year. They stay in leaf all year, getting rather more silvery-leafed in summer then greening as soon as it rains in autumn. But they've never self-sown seedlings, rather to our surprise.
Alisdair Aird
Gardens in SE England (Sussex); also coastal Southern Greece, and (in a very small way) South West France; MGS member (and former president); vice chairman RHS Lily Group, past chairman Cyclamen Society