Roses

  • 183 Replies
  • 63808 Views

Joanna Savage

  • Sr. Member
Re: Roses
« Reply #30 on: September 06, 2012, 09:25:49 AM »
Re. Alisdair and rooted cuttings of roses. I had some old idea that roses should be grafted, but I am not sure what advantage the rootstock was supposed to provide. Are any roses grafted these days?
Having said that I am regularly moving bits of Rosa canina around the place and planting in the wild boar tracks. As blackberries don't deter them I don't suppose R.canina will either, but I do love the flower. It is a very different rose from  the marvellous flowers you all have been illustrating.

pamela

  • Sr. Member
Re: Roses
« Reply #31 on: September 06, 2012, 02:26:51 PM »
Jorun,  it depends when you order them. They have a window when they  send bareroot roses. You should be able to order very soon for delivery in the next months. You will see it on the website of Peter Beales...
Jávea, Costa Blanca, Spain
Min temp 5c max temp 38c  Rainfall 550 mm 

"Who passes by sees the leaves;
 Who asks, sees the roots."
     - Charcoal Seller, Madagascar

*

JTh

  • Hero Member
Re: Roses
« Reply #32 on: September 06, 2012, 02:45:31 PM »
Thank you, Pamela
Retired veterinary surgeon by training with a PhD in parasitology,  but worked as a virologist since 1992.
Member of the MGS  since 2004. Gardening in Oslo and to a limited extent in Halkidiki, Greece.

Alice

  • Hero Member
Re: Roses
« Reply #33 on: September 06, 2012, 04:30:00 PM »
Interesting one, Joanna - cuttings vs grafting.
I have read that Tea roses, at least, strike easily from cuttings but a plant would take longer to grow from a cutting, so for economic reasons, roses available commercially are usually grafted.
I would like to know if this applies more generally and what plants definitely need to be grafted.
Amateur gardener who has gardened in north London and now gardens part of the year on the Cycladic island of Paros. Conditions: coastal, windy, annual rainfall 350mm, temp 0-35 degrees C.

Sandra

  • Newbie
Re: Roses
« Reply #34 on: September 15, 2012, 11:31:25 PM »
I've had success taking cuttings of my David Austen roses to Greece and rooting them there. Once rooted, the rate of growth has been phenomenal and I now have some lovely roses in the garden including Wild Edric, Ispohan, Generous Gardener and Gentle Hermione. I'd love to try Alistir's rose in a very shady spot - it looks beautiful.
Sandra Panting
I garden in the Southern Peloponnese, Greece and will soon be creating a small garden in Northampton, England.  I'm co-head of the MGS Peloponnese group and a member of the RHS.

Daisy

  • Sr. Member
Re: Roses
« Reply #35 on: March 18, 2013, 10:21:00 AM »
Well I can't call them early roses anymore, as it is mid March. So when I found the first bloom on Abraham Darby this morning, I thought I would put him here.


march 2013 012 by Daisyincrete, on Flickr

He is planted near a wall and faces north west, so he doesn't get much sun in winter.

I couldn't resist taking a photo of Lady Emma Hamilton too. Although she has been blooming all winter.


march 2013 006 by Daisyincrete, on Flickr

Sorry about the wheelbarrow and compost bag in the background. I am working in that area at the moment.

Sandra, if you have photos of your David Austin roses, I would love to see them.
Daisy :)

Amateur gardener, who has gardened in Surrey and Cornwall, England, but now has a tiny garden facing north west, near the coast in north east Crete. It is 300 meters above sea level. On a steep learning curve!!! Member of both MGS and RHS

Daisy

  • Sr. Member
Re: Roses
« Reply #36 on: May 07, 2013, 04:15:19 PM »
I know you have seen my Buff Beauty before, but he is looking so yummy to-day. I had to take a few more photos.
Here he is with forking larkspur. (Thank-you Umbrian)
Daisy :)


april-may 2013 070 by Daisyincrete, on Flickr


april-may 2013 073 by Daisyincrete, on Flickr


april-may 2013 071 by Daisyincrete, on Flickr

Amateur gardener, who has gardened in Surrey and Cornwall, England, but now has a tiny garden facing north west, near the coast in north east Crete. It is 300 meters above sea level. On a steep learning curve!!! Member of both MGS and RHS

Trevor Australis

  • Sr. Member
Re: Roses
« Reply #37 on: May 08, 2013, 12:06:08 AM »
 :)Why do nurseries graft roses? Every single growth bud on every twig and stem is a potential new plant with grafted on to an understock. There are a variety of understocks that are each adapted to different soil conditions particularly very sandy soils and very alkaline soils. A rose cutting with a dozen growth bud produces only one plant on its own roots which 'wastes' potential grafted plants so they seem un-economical to nurserymen. there are other 'reasons' putatively to do with plant health and vigour but I find them less convincing except in the case of some really weak fancy kinds such as 'Prince Camille de Rohan'.

Roses to deter boars:  something with massive armaments such as Rosa bracteata or 'Mermaid' might put them off as they rip flesh instead of scratching it and breaking off. Well, at least they used to rip mine until I got rid of them - but tho' male I am neither boar nor bore, I hope.

tn
M Land. Arch., B. Sp. Ed. Teacher, traveller and usually climate compatible.

Umbrian

  • Hero Member
    • Email
Re: Roses
« Reply #38 on: May 08, 2013, 05:46:17 AM »
You really are a whizz with plants Daisy and I am glad you like the Forking Larkspur. I am going to post some 'photos of two roses I have inherited in my new garden. They are both highly perfumed and I would like to know their names. Perhaps you can help?  or of course any of our experts :)
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.

Umbrian

  • Hero Member
    • Email
Re: Roses
« Reply #39 on: May 08, 2013, 05:53:21 AM »
Wrote this posting but it did not seem to go - hope I am not repeating myself :)
You really are a whizz with plants Daisy and I am glad you like the Forking Larkspur. I am going to post some 'photos of two roses that I have inherited in my new garden. They are both highly perfumed and I would like to know their names please.
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.

Umbrian

  • Hero Member
    • Email
Re: Roses
« Reply #40 on: May 08, 2013, 06:00:57 AM »
Whoops, first posting did go after all, Anyway the two 'photos are of the same rose (the Red one) and here, hopefully, is the Pink one ;D When open it has an orangy/yellow tinge in the centre of the petals
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.

Umbrian

  • Hero Member
    • Email
Re: Roses
« Reply #41 on: May 12, 2013, 07:03:51 AM »
 :( Like you John J I have noticed that the Forum is rather quiet at the moment, I suppose everyone is busy with the practical side of gardening in what ,for many of us, is a very busy time of the year. Continuing unsettled weather here in Italy has seen weeds proliferating at an amazing rate as one or two days of sunshine are followed by heavy rain.
I am still hoping that somebody will be able to put a name to the two roses I posted 'photos of the other day and so each morning when I access the Forum is still full of anticipation :)
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.

Daisy

  • Sr. Member
Re: Roses
« Reply #42 on: June 18, 2013, 10:47:55 AM »
Sorry Umbrian, I cannot identify your roses.
They are beauties though.
I am looking forward to seeing some photos of your new garden.

Sorry about the delay in responding. I went to England to visit relatives, but was taken ill and spent most of the time in hospital.
I have only just got back to my garden and my computer!
Daisy :)
Amateur gardener, who has gardened in Surrey and Cornwall, England, but now has a tiny garden facing north west, near the coast in north east Crete. It is 300 meters above sea level. On a steep learning curve!!! Member of both MGS and RHS

*

Alisdair

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
Re: Roses
« Reply #43 on: June 18, 2013, 07:29:00 PM »
So sorry to hear your time in England was plagued by illness, Daisy; I'm sure the sight of your own wonderful garden will be revitalising you now!
Alisdair Aird
Gardens in SE England (Sussex); also coastal Southern Greece, and (in a very small way) South West France; MGS member (and former president); vice chairman RHS Lily Group, past chairman Cyclamen Society

Umbrian

  • Hero Member
    • Email
Re: Roses
« Reply #44 on: June 19, 2013, 06:59:06 AM »
A big welcome back Daisy - we have missed you and so sorry to hear that you were unwell when in England. Your garden looks as amazing as ever and I hope thoughts of it (not worries at being away for so long) helped to sustain you during your stay in hospital.
Am hoping to get an Italian friend who is an expert on roses to come and look at mine when they are in flower again, at the moment they are resting bit I know they are repeat flowering. Have not done anything in the new garden yet except try to keep the weeds down, our mega wet spring has seen them proliferate both there and here where we are still living and I more than have my work cut out as you can imagine in trying to keep this looking good for prospective buyers!
Hope all is well now and you can enjoy your little bit of paradise in Crete for the rest of the summer :)
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.