Roses

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Daisy

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Roses
« on: December 28, 2011, 08:21:10 AM »
I wanted to put this on Umbrian's out of season plants thread.
But then I realised, I was thinking with my English hat on, and as all the village roses also seem to be blooming now, mine cannot be out of season.
I have not yet been gardening long enough in the Mediterranean, to know what is out of season or not! ::)
Anyway here is Buff Beauty yesterday.
Daisy :)





Amateur gardener, who has gardened in Surrey and Cornwall, England, but now has a tiny garden facing north west, near the coast in north east Crete. It is 300 meters above sea level. On a steep learning curve!!! Member of both MGS and RHS

Umbrian

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Re: Roses
« Reply #1 on: December 28, 2011, 08:42:33 AM »
Quite agree Daisy it is often easy to think with one's English hat on without always realising, I still do it at times after nearly 14 years gardening in Umbria! On odd occasions I would have a rose out on Christmas Day even in England depending on the weather of course. This year in Umbria, where we have enjoyed a very mild autumn/early winter, my rosa mutabalis gave a wonderful show until halted in its tracks by almost gale force winds and driving rain in mid December. If it had not been for this storm my list of flowers would have been much longer with many things hanging on much longer than normal but what interested me was the way the poppy for example had germinated and flowered as if it was spring which is their season. Also a friend of mine scattered some coriander seeds after the plants had, as usual bolted into seed as soon as the temperatures soared. These germinated in early autumn and until the recent frosts were rewarding her with abundant fresh leaves due to the milder than normal conditions. :)
Love the Buff Beauty planted in the terracotta pot :) :)
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.

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Alisdair

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Re: Roses
« Reply #2 on: December 28, 2011, 09:29:52 AM »
Excellent idea of yours to start a thread on roses here, Daisy: thanks very much!
In our Greek garden we decided originally not to plant any shrub roses because we do think of them as so English, but of course that's nonsense, as they are such staples of Greek and other Mediterranean gardens - and all our Greek neighbours, who have spectacular ones, immediately asked why we weren't planting any!
Alisdair Aird
Gardens in SE England (Sussex); also coastal Southern Greece, and (in a very small way) South West France; MGS member (and former president); vice chairman RHS Lily Group, past chairman Cyclamen Society

Daisy

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Re: Roses
« Reply #3 on: December 31, 2011, 11:31:02 AM »
Alisdair, May I suggest, that for the dry part of your garden, you may like to try Tea roses.
These roses, once established, need no watering at all.
They have been found thriving in many abandoned gardens, in mediterranean climates worldwide.
They flower all through the autumn, winter, spring and early summer.
When watered, they flower year round and are evergreen.
Here are mine.





Papa Gontier.



Duchess de Brabant.



Climbing Devoniensis. This one, in my garden, sometimes has powdery mildew.
However, it is only one year old, I am hoping it will grow out of it.





Archduke Joseph. Unusually, for a Tea rose, this one does not like full sun in summer.
I have planted mine, under the shade of an apricot tree, where it only gets  sunshine for the last half hour of the day.





Sombreuil. In the evening sun, over an arbour.



Marechal Niel.

I would have more tea roses, as they like it so much here. The only reason I do not, is because, with the exception of Sombreiul which is very free with it's perfume,, my nose cannot smell the tea rose scent.
Other people tell me that they have a lovely perfume, but my nose can only catch it a little, at an optimum time.
Daisy :)


« Last Edit: December 31, 2011, 11:41:36 AM by Daisy »
Amateur gardener, who has gardened in Surrey and Cornwall, England, but now has a tiny garden facing north west, near the coast in north east Crete. It is 300 meters above sea level. On a steep learning curve!!! Member of both MGS and RHS

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Alisdair

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Re: Roses
« Reply #4 on: December 31, 2011, 12:45:46 PM »
Your tea roses are lovely!
We still rather resist the idea of roses in our Greek garden on the slightly perverse grounds that they are just too beautiful for the semi-wild dry part, though we have planted one or two climbers. But we have put in some tea roses in our garden in SW France, where they do well despite hot summer droughts, especially a Climbing Lady Hillingdon. I'm very fond of them. We do have one or two here in Sussex, as well - we picked a bunch of roses for the table on Christmas Day which included General Schablikine, alongside other strongly scented ones such as the bourbon Reine Victoria.
Alisdair Aird
Gardens in SE England (Sussex); also coastal Southern Greece, and (in a very small way) South West France; MGS member (and former president); vice chairman RHS Lily Group, past chairman Cyclamen Society

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MikeHardman

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Re: Roses
« Reply #5 on: December 31, 2011, 01:18:25 PM »
Didn't she do well?!
Nice going Daisy
Mike
Geologist by Uni training, IT consultant, Referee for Viola for Botanical Society of the British Isles, commissioned author and photographer on Viola for RHS (Enc. of Perennials, The Garden, The Plantsman).
I garden near Polis, Cyprus, 100m alt., on marl, but have gardened mainly in S.England

ezeiza

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Re: Roses
« Reply #6 on: December 31, 2011, 02:27:16 PM »
There are zillions of them but I can mention a few that are exceptionally resistant to heat

Just Joey
Altissimo
Mirato

Daisy

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Re: Roses
« Reply #7 on: January 27, 2012, 11:32:16 AM »
I am having difficulty, finding a deep red rose that can take the hot sun here.
I am very fussy I'm afraid. ::) ::) ::)
It must be full and opulent.
It must grow gracefully, (not like most hybrid teas) ;)
It must flower for a long time and it must absolutely knock my socks off with it's perfume. ;D ;D ;D
I have already tried Francis Dubreuil/Barcelona, but it's petals just burnt in the sun as soon as they opened.
I also have William Shakespeare 2000 planted mainly in the shade of an apricot tree.
The blooms in the shade of the tree are fine, but the blooms that poke out into the sun get burnt.
Has anyone any ideas?
Daisy :)







William Shakespeare 2000 under the apricot tree, with verbenas, Lychnis coronaria and Rhemannia elata.
My camera doesn't capture the true colour, it has a little deeper hue than this.




Amateur gardener, who has gardened in Surrey and Cornwall, England, but now has a tiny garden facing north west, near the coast in north east Crete. It is 300 meters above sea level. On a steep learning curve!!! Member of both MGS and RHS

Jill S

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Re: Roses
« Reply #8 on: January 27, 2012, 03:05:30 PM »
Falstaff from David Austin seems to be OK in full sun, but that is Surrey sun, not Cretan. Otherwise would meet your requirements. So far I haven't dared try roses on Paros, although they are always available in nurseries there. Really must pluck up courage soon. Pics of your plants are super.
Member of RHS and MGS. Gardens in Surrey, UK and, whenever I get the chance, on Paros, Greece where the learning curve is not the only thing that's steep.

David Bracey

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Re: Roses
« Reply #9 on: January 27, 2012, 03:46:04 PM »
We grew Falstaff in the Languedoc.  An excellent deep red rose with huge thorns.  It goes-off in hot weather and looses most of its leaves or maybe its the black spot which takes over!

TMG no 42 lists 60 odd roses which Languedoc members recommend growing in the Midi.  Many HT`s are mentioned.  There is an article by T Nottle about rose growing in Australia and what he recommends.
MGS member.

 I have gardened in sub-tropical Florida, maritime UK, continental Europe and the Mediterranean basin, France. Of the 4 I have found that the most difficult climate for gardening is the latter.

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oron peri

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Re: Roses
« Reply #10 on: January 27, 2012, 06:32:20 PM »
Daisy what about 'Oklahoma'. it is doing very well here in very hot and dry conditions and the scent is to die for, plus you can make a Rose Jam from it [not on your list...found you another job ;)].
« Last Edit: January 27, 2012, 06:34:14 PM by oron peri »
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Living and gardening in Tivon, Lower Galilee region, North Israel.
Min temp 5c Max 42c, around 450mm rain.

David Bracey

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Re: Roses
« Reply #11 on: January 27, 2012, 09:07:19 PM »
Daisy could you should publish your pics of your garden on the "Members` Gardens" page on the MGS website??
MGS member.

 I have gardened in sub-tropical Florida, maritime UK, continental Europe and the Mediterranean basin, France. Of the 4 I have found that the most difficult climate for gardening is the latter.

Daisy

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Re: Roses
« Reply #12 on: January 29, 2012, 11:11:55 AM »
Thank-you all for your ideas. :) :) :)
Jills and David. Falstaff has exactly the sort of blooms I love most!
Luckily, there is no black spot here in Crete. At least, not until the damp weather starts in the winter.
So hopefully it should do well.
I don't have TMG no 42. Is it the answer to life, the universe and everything? I can get a back copy though.

Oron. Oklahoma is a rose I don't know. I have found lots of photos of it on the web and it looks lovely. I even managed to find some photos of the whole bush and it appears to have a good shape, and, has foliage down to the ground.
The colour is hard to tell from the photos. Some of them look a deep wine red and some look more orange. Not that it matters. It just determines where I put it.
Which do you think it is? Or does it vary, dependent on the weather or season?
I have never heard of rose jam. I  am the worlds worst cook and have given up trying.
My husband luckily loves cooking, and does all of it. ;D ;D ;D
However, rose jam sounds intriguing. If you post the recipe I will have to try it ;D ;D ;D

David. Last autumn, the paving and steps were finally finished. So, this coming season, barring any disasters, the garden should look more presentable.
I will take some more photos and see how they turn out.
The members garden on the main site, is a good idea.
Is your's there? There are some lovely gardens shown in the Languedoc. Is your's one of them?
I have also recently been admiring Umbrian's garden on that page.
Also Michel Gautier's garden, which I have been visiting via his link, I would love to see there.
Daisy :)

For those who never read the book, heard the radio programme, or watched the television series,
No. 42 was the answer to life, the universe and everything, in Douglas Adam's The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy.
Amateur gardener, who has gardened in Surrey and Cornwall, England, but now has a tiny garden facing north west, near the coast in north east Crete. It is 300 meters above sea level. On a steep learning curve!!! Member of both MGS and RHS

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JTh

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Re: Roses
« Reply #13 on: January 29, 2012, 11:48:11 AM »
Oklahoma sounds like a very good rose, I'll be looking for that. I see that it shares the same parents a 'Mister Lincoln' and 'Papa Meilland' roses, and it's the darkest red of the three red roses (not orange), and with repeat-flowering blooms and strong rose fragrance, it sounds ideal.
Retired veterinary surgeon by training with a PhD in parasitology,  but worked as a virologist since 1992.
Member of the MGS  since 2004. Gardening in Oslo and to a limited extent in Halkidiki, Greece.

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JTh

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Re: Roses
« Reply #14 on: January 29, 2012, 11:57:15 AM »
I have only a few roses in Halkidiki, and few photos, but I like this one. It was taken several years ago.
Retired veterinary surgeon by training with a PhD in parasitology,  but worked as a virologist since 1992.
Member of the MGS  since 2004. Gardening in Oslo and to a limited extent in Halkidiki, Greece.