Pest on Lemon Tree

  • 22 Replies
  • 51303 Views
*

JTh

  • Hero Member
    • Email
Re: Pest on Lemon Tree
« Reply #15 on: November 21, 2011, 03:37:55 PM »
I agree, the photo is not very clear, it does look different from other scale insects I am more familiar with, but I can see a resemblance with Icerya purchasi (cottony cushion scale), which is affecting citrus trees, I have copied a photo from Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scale_insect).  
« Last Edit: November 21, 2011, 03:41:08 PM by JTh »
Retired veterinary surgeon by training with a PhD in parasitology,  but worked as a virologist since 1992.
Member of the MGS  since 2004. Gardening in Oslo and to a limited extent in Halkidiki, Greece.

Umbrian

  • Hero Member
    • Email
Re: Pest on Lemon Tree
« Reply #16 on: November 22, 2011, 10:37:27 AM »
Sorry about the quality of the photo folks but we only had a small camera with us at the time. In comparison to your photo Jorun of the cottony scale insect I would say it is a different shape altogether - the ones on the tree were really tapered toward the back end i.e. the part not attached to the tree. Of course they may have been at a different stage of development!
Anyway I passed on the advice to treat with Methylated spirits opting for the paint brush application as the tree, being in a pot, is obviously small and easily accessible.
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.

ezeiza

  • Full Member
Re: Pest on Lemon Tree
« Reply #17 on: November 22, 2011, 08:06:54 PM »
Umbrian, applying it with a paint brush is a penitence. If you add 10% of water roughly you can spray it on the pests, a method a thousand times faster and easier.

Umbrian

  • Hero Member
    • Email
Re: Pest on Lemon Tree
« Reply #18 on: November 23, 2011, 08:29:26 AM »
As I said in my last posting ezeiza, the Lemon tree in question is small and so to treat the pest with a paintbrush is not too arduous! I was aware of David's concern about "spraying Methylated spirits around" but have to add that I am sure serious gardeners ,such as us who use the forum, would always proceed with care and caution especially when treating a subject with edible fruits. I, and my friend who owns the Lemon tree in question, try to be as "green" as possible but sometimes have to resort to more drastic measures. David added that the success of treatment with Methylated spirits has not been proven but the fact that three replies recommended it seems to be good proof to me that in fact it does work. 
How do other members feel about this and the whole question of what we can use to eradicate unwanted pests in our gardens? ???
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.

*

John

  • Hero Member
Re: Pest on Lemon Tree
« Reply #19 on: November 23, 2011, 10:08:52 AM »
I have to say that I have used the meths spray or brush on many subjects which has been especially effective against mealybug particularly on difficult subjects such as cacti. On a larger scale (pun here I think) I use a horticultural soap spray which theoretically can be used on edible crops.
John
Horticulturist, photographer, author, garden designer and plant breeder; MGS member and RHS committee member. I garden at home in SW London and also at work in South London.

ezeiza

  • Full Member
Re: Pest on Lemon Tree
« Reply #20 on: November 23, 2011, 04:35:38 PM »
Ás I understand it, David is questioning something else. The effects on insects and mites are demolishing and immediate as anyone can see. It even kills cockroaches. Instantly. Since the treatment is on the present pest and in such minute quantities, it is as organic as other products can be. So much so that if the small quantity of water is not added all of the alcohol would evaporate within seconds.

Of course the traditional method has been to paint the pests one by one but spraying the foliage, trunks, etc. affected, with a hand sprayer makes it very fast to treat several plants, etc.

Paul T.

  • Newbie
    • Email
Re: Pest on Lemon Tree
« Reply #21 on: November 24, 2011, 08:41:12 AM »
Howdy Folks,

I've just seen this topic for the first time and my thoughts immediately on seeing the initial picture were that it was cottony cushion scale.  I get it periodically on my own lemon tree, usually cared for by ants.  The easiest treatment for it (and the one I have always used) is one of the horticultural oil or soap sprays.  These can be based on petroleum oil or the newer ones such as "Eco-Oil" are based on vegetable oils and "Natrasoap" I think.  They suffocate the scale, killing them almost instantly.  They are otherwise safe and non toxic.  I wouldn't be using methylated spirits in general, although I am fairly sure that the cell structure of citrus would hold up to it.  I have heard of people (no idea whether this is an urban myth or not) who have used metho on scale on african violets (Saintpaulia) and had the leaf material literally dissolve where it touched.  Hearing that I've tended to shy away from using any straight metho on anything plant-wise. ;D  If only it would work that way on the weeds.  ;)
Cheers.

Paul T.
Canberra, Australia.
Min winter temp -8 or -9°C. Max summer temp 40°C. Thankfully, maybe once or twice a year only.

*

Alisdair

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
Re: Pest on Lemon Tree
« Reply #22 on: November 26, 2011, 05:23:23 PM »
Carole, your bold question:

As I said in my last posting ezeiza, the Lemon tree in question is small and so to treat the pest with a paintbrush is not too arduous! I was aware of David's concern about "spraying Methylated spirits around" but have to add that I am sure serious gardeners ,such as us who use the forum, would always proceed with care and caution especially when treating a subject with edible fruits. I, and my friend who owns the Lemon tree in question, try to be as "green" as possible but sometimes have to resort to more drastic measures. David added that the success of treatment with Methylated spirits has not been proven but the fact that three replies recommended it seems to be good proof to me that in fact it does work. 
How do other members feel about this and the whole question of what we can use to eradicate unwanted pests in our gardens? ???

This is such a big issue that it really deserves an entirely separate question.
So if you have views on the general question of how green we should be, to use or not to use pesticides etc, do click here!
Alisdair Aird
Gardens in SE England (Sussex); also coastal Southern Greece, and (in a very small way) South West France; MGS member (and former president); vice chairman RHS Lily Group, past chairman Cyclamen Society