Aloe

  • 35 Replies
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andrewsloan

  • Jr. Member
Re: Aloe
« Reply #30 on: December 23, 2018, 07:26:34 PM »
Aloes aculeata has quite distinctive whitish thorns on the leaves. Aculeta, ferox and reitzii are very similar. You'll know for sure when the flowers open up.

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John J

  • Hero Member
Re: Aloe
« Reply #31 on: December 24, 2018, 06:12:37 AM »
Thanks for that, Andrew, they should open in the next few days so I'll post a photo when they do. All the best for the Festive Season to you both and we hope to meet up again sometime soon.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

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Fermi

  • Hero Member
    • Email
Re: Aloe
« Reply #32 on: January 11, 2020, 02:32:09 PM »
We got a couple of pieces of this Aloe from a neighbour about 15 years ago, I think. This is the first year it has managed to produce flowers.
If anyone can suggest a name I would be grateful,
cheers
fermi
Mr F de Sousa, Central Victoria, Australia
member of AGS, SRGC, NARGS
working as a physio to support my gardening habit!

Caroline

  • Full Member
Re: Aloe
« Reply #33 on: January 12, 2020, 01:57:52 AM »
Is it Aloe mitriformis?
I am establishing a garden on Waiheke Island, 35 minutes out of Auckland. The site is windy, the clay soil dries out quickly in summer and is like plasticine in winter, but it is still very rewarding. Water is an issue, as we depend on tanks. I'm looking forward to sharing ideas. Caroline

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Fermi

  • Hero Member
    • Email
Re: Aloe
« Reply #34 on: January 25, 2020, 05:29:31 AM »
Hi Caroline,
thanks for that suggestion which is what I'll go with until advised otherwise!
Aloes seem to be in flower on both sides of the equator as seen on Instagram!
cheers
fermi
Mr F de Sousa, Central Victoria, Australia
member of AGS, SRGC, NARGS
working as a physio to support my gardening habit!

Caroline

  • Full Member
Re: Aloe
« Reply #35 on: January 26, 2020, 01:01:02 AM »
Things are so dry here that the rabbits have nibbled my A. mitriformis in an attempt to get some moisture.
I am establishing a garden on Waiheke Island, 35 minutes out of Auckland. The site is windy, the clay soil dries out quickly in summer and is like plasticine in winter, but it is still very rewarding. Water is an issue, as we depend on tanks. I'm looking forward to sharing ideas. Caroline