Euphorbia

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John

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Re: Euphorbia from Mexico ? ID'd as Euphorbia xanti
« Reply #30 on: October 27, 2012, 10:54:46 PM »
Who's the Euphorbia expert?
John
Horticulturist, photographer, author, garden designer and plant breeder; MGS member and RHS committee member. I garden at home in SW London and also at work in South London.

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oron peri

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Re: Euphorbia from Mexico ? ID'd as Euphorbia xanti
« Reply #31 on: October 28, 2012, 12:48:26 PM »
Mr. Fielding, you probably know him...
Garden Designer, Bulb man, Botanical tours guide.
Living and gardening in Tivon, Lower Galilee region, North Israel.
Min temp 5c Max 42c, around 450mm rain.

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John

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Re: Euphorbia from Mexico ? ID'd as Euphorbia xanti
« Reply #32 on: October 28, 2012, 01:08:46 PM »
Ho! I thought you must have meant someone else. I suppose I am aspiring to be an expert on this subject but wouldn't say I am.
Here from the same group as Rosies is E. antisyphilitica which I took on our trip to Israel.
Perhaps this thread should be attached to the Euphorbia thread.
John
Horticulturist, photographer, author, garden designer and plant breeder; MGS member and RHS committee member. I garden at home in SW London and also at work in South London.

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oron peri

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Re: Euphorbia from Mexico ? ID'd as Euphorbia xanti
« Reply #33 on: October 28, 2012, 02:07:38 PM »
Perhaps this thread should be attached to the Euphorbia thread.
Done
Garden Designer, Bulb man, Botanical tours guide.
Living and gardening in Tivon, Lower Galilee region, North Israel.
Min temp 5c Max 42c, around 450mm rain.

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John

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Re: Euphorbia
« Reply #34 on: October 28, 2012, 02:52:06 PM »
It is really amazing how this group of Euphorbia produce their inflorescences to mimic a true flower
John
Horticulturist, photographer, author, garden designer and plant breeder; MGS member and RHS committee member. I garden at home in SW London and also at work in South London.

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John

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Re: Euphorbia
« Reply #35 on: November 03, 2012, 10:13:08 AM »
Just out of interest do any of you grow Euphorbia canariensis out in the open garden? I'm sure some do but probably only in coastal frost free areas.
John
Horticulturist, photographer, author, garden designer and plant breeder; MGS member and RHS committee member. I garden at home in SW London and also at work in South London.

pamela

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Re: Euphorbia
« Reply #36 on: November 03, 2012, 07:11:06 PM »
Although I personally do not grow E. canariensis, some of my neighbours do.
Jávea, Costa Blanca, Spain
Min temp 5c max temp 38c  Rainfall 550 mm 

"Who passes by sees the leaves;
 Who asks, sees the roots."
     - Charcoal Seller, Madagascar

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John

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Re: Euphorbia
« Reply #37 on: November 03, 2012, 07:20:36 PM »
Thanks for letting me know. I thought it would be interesting to see where it is cultivated. You say you only get down to 5ºC so it isn't surprising if it is happy in your area.
John
Horticulturist, photographer, author, garden designer and plant breeder; MGS member and RHS committee member. I garden at home in SW London and also at work in South London.

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John

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Re: Euphorbia
« Reply #38 on: November 16, 2012, 10:51:19 AM »
Anyone else had experience with E. canariensis?
John
Horticulturist, photographer, author, garden designer and plant breeder; MGS member and RHS committee member. I garden at home in SW London and also at work in South London.

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John

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Re: Euphorbia
« Reply #39 on: November 19, 2012, 10:17:36 AM »
Here's a picture of it from seed last year. though it isn't going to do too well in a London garden.
John
Horticulturist, photographer, author, garden designer and plant breeder; MGS member and RHS committee member. I garden at home in SW London and also at work in South London.

Joanna Savage

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Re: Euphorbia
« Reply #40 on: November 30, 2012, 11:53:23 AM »
Euphorbia lathyris? Does anyone have an opinion or comment about this plant which seems to have the common name 'caper spurge'. On the one hand I read that it is useful in repelling moles (I hope that includes voles). On the other hand The warnings about its potential to be a pest are rather dire. I am looking at a current seed list. It looks attractive.

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John

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Re: Euphorbia
« Reply #41 on: November 30, 2012, 06:41:17 PM »
If happy it can be very weedy. Though it isn't a perennial only biennial but will seed around it would partly depend on how diligent you are at weeding out those you don't want!
John
Horticulturist, photographer, author, garden designer and plant breeder; MGS member and RHS committee member. I garden at home in SW London and also at work in South London.

Umbrian

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Re: Euphorbia
« Reply #42 on: November 30, 2012, 07:17:10 PM »
I think it is quite attractive - in small numbers - and often self-seeded plants crop up in the most unexpected places where they look most attractive but where one would never have envisaged planting them.  Unlike some things this Euphorbia is easily pulled out when too prolific. As to its ability to deter moles.... I have never found anyone who could confirm this but......one never knows ???
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.

Joanna Savage

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Re: Euphorbia
« Reply #43 on: December 01, 2012, 07:21:11 AM »
Thanks to John and Umbrian for advice. I'll try some seed and if it gerrminates take care to see that it remains inside the fence.

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Alisdair

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Re: Euphorbia canariensis
« Reply #44 on: December 05, 2012, 06:08:35 PM »
Going back to John's question about E. canariensis, a Canary Islands euphorbia which we saw growing well in several places in Victoria and South Australia was Euphorbia bourgeana syn. lambii - top two pictures. But it was always in frost-free gardens.
The most popular euphorbia we saw there seemed to be Euphorbia characias 'Tasmanian Tiger', selected some 20 years ago in Tasmania. People growing it often just called it Tassie Tiger. It is available in Europe too. Bottom picture.
Yes folks, at last I'm getting back in action! I've missed you all....
« Last Edit: December 05, 2012, 06:10:23 PM by Alisdair »
Alisdair Aird
Gardens in SE England (Sussex); also coastal Southern Greece, and (in a very small way) South West France; MGS member (and former president); vice chairman RHS Lily Group, past chairman Cyclamen Society