Euphorbia

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Alisdair

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Re: Euphorbia
« Reply #15 on: July 24, 2012, 02:54:17 PM »
Lovely picture of the pulmonaria!
Alisdair Aird
Gardens in SE England (Sussex); also coastal Southern Greece, and (in a very small way) South West France; MGS member (and former president); vice chairman RHS Lily Group, past chairman Cyclamen Society

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John

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Re: Euphorbia
« Reply #16 on: July 24, 2012, 03:35:27 PM »
Thanks, not the Euphorbias?
Also on Montseny were a few limited populations of Euphorbia characias subsp. characias with admittedly rather dull bracts and well past flowering in May and in fruit.
John
Horticulturist, photographer, author, garden designer and plant breeder; MGS member and RHS committee member. I garden at home in SW London and also at work in South London.

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MikeHardman

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Euphorbia chamaesyce
« Reply #17 on: July 27, 2012, 09:33:17 PM »
This little weed introduced itself to me, and I allowed it to stay. So far (a year now), it has been well behaved. It is native in Cyprus.
It forms a very thin carpet of tiny leaves and tinier flowers, and although it grows better with moisture, it is OK without.
In these photos, you can see it filling crevies between rocks as well as spreading (which keeps the dust down). The petunia provides some scale.
Mike
Geologist by Uni training, IT consultant, Referee for Viola for Botanical Society of the British Isles, commissioned author and photographer on Viola for RHS (Enc. of Perennials, The Garden, The Plantsman).
I garden near Polis, Cyprus, 100m alt., on marl, but have gardened mainly in S.England

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John

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Re: Euphorbia
« Reply #18 on: July 28, 2012, 07:44:14 AM »
Yes I think it's a charming little plant which you will never be without now! Surprisingly though I have seen this on Crete it was only once or twice. No doubt it will be common there in places I have missed it. On Mallorca it was common but often affected by this rust which disfigured it and caused it to produce upright growths.
John
Horticulturist, photographer, author, garden designer and plant breeder; MGS member and RHS committee member. I garden at home in SW London and also at work in South London.

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MikeHardman

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Re: Euphorbia
« Reply #19 on: July 28, 2012, 04:23:55 PM »
Curious. Perhaps evolved as an aid to spore dispersal? Who knows.
Mike
Geologist by Uni training, IT consultant, Referee for Viola for Botanical Society of the British Isles, commissioned author and photographer on Viola for RHS (Enc. of Perennials, The Garden, The Plantsman).
I garden near Polis, Cyprus, 100m alt., on marl, but have gardened mainly in S.England

pamela

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Re: Euphorbia griffithii
« Reply #20 on: July 28, 2012, 06:55:06 PM »
Does anyone grow E. griffithii 'Fireglow'?. One of the most beautiful euphorbias in my opinion.  I have tried three times here but the last one has just succumbed......so disappointing. I am going to have one more try!
Jávea, Costa Blanca, Spain
Min temp 5c max temp 38c  Rainfall 550 mm 

"Who passes by sees the leaves;
 Who asks, sees the roots."
     - Charcoal Seller, Madagascar

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John

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Re: Euphorbia
« Reply #21 on: July 28, 2012, 07:06:27 PM »
Yes E. griffithii is lovely but is perhaps more of a colder temperate climate than you have and it can be quite invasive in some situations. If you have a pond try growing it as a marginal but with it's root crown out of the water where it may be happier.
John
Horticulturist, photographer, author, garden designer and plant breeder; MGS member and RHS committee member. I garden at home in SW London and also at work in South London.

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Alisdair

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Re: Euphorbia
« Reply #22 on: July 28, 2012, 07:23:51 PM »
Fireglow grows well for us here in Sussex (as does a stronger but greener E. griffithii that I raised from seed from the Sikkim Himalayas), but I wouldn't fancy its chances in our hot Greek garden.
Alisdair Aird
Gardens in SE England (Sussex); also coastal Southern Greece, and (in a very small way) South West France; MGS member (and former president); vice chairman RHS Lily Group, past chairman Cyclamen Society

pamela

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Re: Euphorbia
« Reply #23 on: July 28, 2012, 07:35:56 PM »
Well,  my garden is quite shady, lots of dappled shade and that is where I planted the last one.  It has been watered every day now in July.  But I think perhaps its the alkaline soil that it doesn't like.I can't seem to find its specific soil requirements.  Other euphobias eg E. myrsinities, E. rigida
E. characias ‘Wulfenii’,  E. pithyusa all grow really well here.

« Last Edit: July 29, 2012, 10:46:34 AM by pamela »
Jávea, Costa Blanca, Spain
Min temp 5c max temp 38c  Rainfall 550 mm 

"Who passes by sees the leaves;
 Who asks, sees the roots."
     - Charcoal Seller, Madagascar

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John

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Re: Euphorbia
« Reply #24 on: July 28, 2012, 11:18:42 PM »
The big difference between those and E. griffithii is that it is Himalayan and they are Mediterranean.
John
Horticulturist, photographer, author, garden designer and plant breeder; MGS member and RHS committee member. I garden at home in SW London and also at work in South London.

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Rosie

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Euphorbia from Mexico ? ID'd as Euphorbia xanti
« Reply #25 on: October 25, 2012, 12:51:34 AM »
Help please with identifying this wonderful plant, does really well here but takes some time to get going - and then suckers !
« Last Edit: October 25, 2012, 11:17:46 AM by Fleur Pavlidis »

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oron peri

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Re: Euphorbia from Mexico ?
« Reply #26 on: October 25, 2012, 07:26:40 AM »
Hi Rosie,
I'm afraid your photo is too small,
any chance of uploading a bigger photo?, or you can send it to my email address.
Oron
Garden Designer, Bulb man, Botanical tours guide.
Living and gardening in Tivon, Lower Galilee region, North Israel.
Min temp 5c Max 42c, around 450mm rain.

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John J

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Re: Euphorbia from Mexico ?
« Reply #27 on: October 25, 2012, 08:37:23 AM »
Rosie, in your heading you imply that it might be from Mexico. Have you tried E. antisyphilitica?
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

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oron peri

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Re: Euphorbia from Mexico ?
« Reply #28 on: October 25, 2012, 08:58:09 AM »
Sounds by its growth habit like Euphorbia xanti.
We have an expert for the genus in the forum, surely he will help ;)
Garden Designer, Bulb man, Botanical tours guide.
Living and gardening in Tivon, Lower Galilee region, North Israel.
Min temp 5c Max 42c, around 450mm rain.

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Rosie

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    • Gardening in Portugal
Re: Euphorbia from Mexico ?
« Reply #29 on: October 25, 2012, 10:18:18 AM »
I have looked up both David's and Oron's suggested names on google images and I am going with E. xanti. It does run and it has a very loose habit and the flowers look right too. Yippee, another one nailed. thanks very much to one and all.