Euphorbia

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John

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Euphorbia
« on: October 30, 2011, 05:18:15 PM »
Some of you will know of my interest in this genus. Over the years I have been photographing them in cultivation and throughout the Mediterranean. I originally saw E. serrata as a dormant plant on Mallorca in the autumn and was pleased to find it in great quantity in Catalonia last May. It has a quiet charm and distinct leaves which are as its name suggests serrated. Here it is growing with Bituminaria bituminosa. No doubt someone will say this has changed its name again!
« Last Edit: October 30, 2011, 05:56:26 PM by Alisdair »
John
Horticulturist, photographer, author, garden designer and plant breeder; MGS member and RHS committee member. I garden at home in SW London and also at work in South London.

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John

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Re: Euphorbia
« Reply #1 on: October 30, 2011, 08:03:09 PM »
Here's another picture of Euphorbia serrata which shows the serrate leaf margins better.
John
Horticulturist, photographer, author, garden designer and plant breeder; MGS member and RHS committee member. I garden at home in SW London and also at work in South London.

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John

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Re: Euphorbia
« Reply #2 on: November 03, 2011, 12:23:45 AM »
Taken on the same trip to Catalonia Euphorbia characias subsp. characias with it's green bracts and dark glands. Subtle compared to E. characias subsp. wulfenii but still very nice and easy to grow.
John
Horticulturist, photographer, author, garden designer and plant breeder; MGS member and RHS committee member. I garden at home in SW London and also at work in South London.

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Pescalune

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Another euphorbia; IDd by Daisy and John as Euphorbia cyparissias
« Reply #3 on: March 28, 2012, 07:09:00 PM »
This one is a tiny euphorbia which was given to me last year by an English friend who couldn't remember the botanical name.
It is so small (less than 5 centimeters high) that I almost missed it; I discovered it today under a much larger E. rigida, and I suddenly recalled having planted it there last year.
I am sure the MGS Forum wizards will soon provide its real name.
Thanks in advance,
Jean
« Last Edit: March 30, 2012, 07:39:31 AM by Alisdair »
Pescalune

Daisy

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Re: Another euphorbia; but which?
« Reply #4 on: March 29, 2012, 05:38:18 AM »
It looks like Euphorbia cyparissias Fens Ruby to me.
Daisy :)
Amateur gardener, who has gardened in Surrey and Cornwall, England, but now has a tiny garden facing north west, near the coast in north east Crete. It is 300 meters above sea level. On a steep learning curve!!! Member of both MGS and RHS

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John

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Re: Another euphorbia; but which?
« Reply #5 on: March 29, 2012, 10:14:53 PM »
You are probably right about it being 'Fens Ruby' though there is a similar cultivar called 'Clarice Howard'. It is very beautiful but Jean take care as it can be an invasive little creature! It will also get taller as it developes. 'Fens Ruby' around 30cm and 'Clarice Howard' to around 40cm.
John
Horticulturist, photographer, author, garden designer and plant breeder; MGS member and RHS committee member. I garden at home in SW London and also at work in South London.

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John

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Re: Euphorbia
« Reply #6 on: July 19, 2012, 07:09:46 PM »
At the RHS Tatton show I saw this display of various plants from the national collections on the Plant Heritage stand. Centre stage were Euphorbia, many of which are of a Mediterranean origin. One of our introductions was just to the left of the central information sign. Euphorbia characias subspecies characias 'Portuguese Velvet'. These plants were from Don Witton's collection. Other plants here include Hedera cultivars from Fibrex. Acanthus from Hillview and Corokia from Greens Leaves.
John
Horticulturist, photographer, author, garden designer and plant breeder; MGS member and RHS committee member. I garden at home in SW London and also at work in South London.

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Bolanthus

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Re: Euphorbia
« Reply #7 on: July 20, 2012, 03:06:53 PM »
Oh euphorbias, I love them! In the picture below you see a slope near road full with E. characias subsp. wulfenii. They just grace the place (also I think you can use them in steep rock gardens as they are fairly chasmophytic in nature).






Aris Zografidis
A lot of interest for the mediterranean flora and for the water wise gardening –but no garden yet. 
my blog on Greek Flora: ROSA SEMPERVIRENS

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John

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Re: Euphorbia
« Reply #8 on: July 20, 2012, 05:23:48 PM »
Can you tell us where they were taken?
John
Horticulturist, photographer, author, garden designer and plant breeder; MGS member and RHS committee member. I garden at home in SW London and also at work in South London.

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Bolanthus

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Re: Euphorbia
« Reply #9 on: July 21, 2012, 12:11:22 AM »
Yes of course; the location is very close to Athens University campus (Panepistimioupolis Zografou), at the western foot of Mt. Hymettus
Aris Zografidis
A lot of interest for the mediterranean flora and for the water wise gardening –but no garden yet. 
my blog on Greek Flora: ROSA SEMPERVIRENS

Alice

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Re: Euphorbia
« Reply #10 on: July 21, 2012, 01:15:03 AM »
Wonderful Euphorbias, Bolanthus!
Amateur gardener who has gardened in north London and now gardens part of the year on the Cycladic island of Paros. Conditions: coastal, windy, annual rainfall 350mm, temp 0-35 degrees C.

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John

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Re: Euphorbia
« Reply #11 on: July 21, 2012, 08:23:01 AM »
Thanks for the location. Here's the same subspecies. E. characias subsp. wulfenii taken in the Mediterranean part of Montenegro on our trip there this May.
John
Horticulturist, photographer, author, garden designer and plant breeder; MGS member and RHS committee member. I garden at home in SW London and also at work in South London.

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John

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Re: Euphorbia
« Reply #12 on: July 21, 2012, 08:24:28 AM »
Thanks for the location. Here's the same subspecies. E. characias subsp. wulfenii taken in the Mediterranean part of Montenegro on our trip there this May. By this time the yellow has mellowed and it is in full fruit but still looks good.
Added this bit on but created another posting!
John
Horticulturist, photographer, author, garden designer and plant breeder; MGS member and RHS committee member. I garden at home in SW London and also at work in South London.

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Marilyn

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Re: Euphorbia
« Reply #13 on: July 23, 2012, 01:29:24 PM »
Oh, lovely! I adore Euphorbias now, but they are probably the best example of a plant that I changed my mind about. I well remember watching an episode of Gardener's World in the mid-90's, showcasing the burgeoning fashion for the genus, and I found them hideously ugly and couldn't see the point. As the years passed and my training and work allowed me to meet them "in person", as it were, they completely won me over. It is apparently, as many of you surely know, the genus that contains the most individual species.
I work in hotel and private gardens, promoting sustainable landscape management in the mediterranean climate through the use of diverse, beautiful and appropriate plants. At home, I garden on two balconies containing mostly succulents.

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John

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Re: Euphorbia
« Reply #14 on: July 24, 2012, 10:04:30 AM »
A mention about verges elsewhere has prompted me to post this. On Montseny, north of Barcelona the road verges were very rich habitats with several Euphorbia species particualarly happy there. This population of Euphorbia villosa was the only one I encountered and only in the verge. In the general photo you can just make out a few Aquilegia vulgaris which again was most prominent in verge habitats. This was the only place that I also came across Pulmonaria longifolia (third picture). I mention this because due to maintenance all of the verges in the park were strimmed clean a process that was making its way up to this site. I was fortunate to get to these when I did as a week later they were all strimmed down. This would not have killed them but does prevent them from seedling and at a time they are at their best!
John
Horticulturist, photographer, author, garden designer and plant breeder; MGS member and RHS committee member. I garden at home in SW London and also at work in South London.