Oenothera

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JTh

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Oenothera
« on: July 14, 2011, 08:34:46 AM »
Here is another herbaceous perennial native to the southern U.S. states and Mexico, Oenothera speciosa, which seems to be well adapted to the mediterranean region. Speciosa means showy, and the pink, rather large flowers are really showy, especially when there are many of them forming a carpet. The stems grow up to 50 cm in height, producing flowers continuously on the upper leaf axils. I got a small clump from somebody in the next village here in Halkidiki some years ago, they have spread very nicely and flower all through the summer. It is drought-resistant and likes full sun; I know it may be invasive, since it spreads by both runners and seeds, but I have not found it to be a problem here, where I am very happy for anything that grows without needing a lot of attention (watering).
Retired veterinary surgeon by training with a PhD in parasitology,  but worked as virologist since 1992.
Member of the MGS and Branch website editor. Gardening in Oslo and to a limited extent in Halkidiki, Greece.

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John

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Re: Oenothera speciosa, pink evening primrose
« Reply #1 on: July 15, 2011, 08:45:32 AM »
On the way to work yesterday I noticed that in Wandsworth Park, just by the river Thames, London. This Oenothera was being used as the edging plant in their summer bedding scheme. It was in full flower and very effective.
John
Horticulturist, photographer, author, garden designer and plant breeder; MGS member and RHS committee member. I garden at home in SW London and also at work in South London.

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Fleur Pavlidis

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Oenothera speciosa
« Reply #2 on: October 12, 2011, 04:00:53 PM »
Then let me continue here with the Oenotheroa speciosa. This plant starts off being perfect in every way - green and bushy with big pink flowers - see first photo of a plant self-sown this year. By the fifth year even with some water it starts the year well but ends looking like the second photo, and without irrigation it looks like photo three. In future I'll rip out the old plants and leave it to self-seed, I think.
« Last Edit: October 12, 2011, 04:34:24 PM by Alisdair »
MGS member, Greece. I garden in Attica, Greece and Mt Goulinas (450m) Central Greece

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Alisdair

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Re: Oenothera
« Reply #3 on: October 12, 2011, 04:30:50 PM »
Fleur's comments above were prompted by her identification of a photo taken by Hilary which you can see by clicking here.
Alisdair Aird
Gardens in SE England (Sussex); also coastal Southern Greece, and (in a very small way) South West France; MGS member (and former president); vice chairman RHS Lily Group, past chairman Cyclamen Society

David Bracey

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Re: Oenothera
« Reply #4 on: October 12, 2011, 08:38:22 PM »
Oenothera another winner which requires little to no attention.  Yes it will get very leggy and scruffy at which time it gets weeded.  It does grow outwards and will fill any gaps.
MGS member.

 I have gardened in sub-tropical Florida, maritime UK, continental Europe and the Mediterranean basin, France. Of the 4 I have found that the most difficult climate for gardening is the latter.

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John J

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Re: Oenothera
« Reply #5 on: June 06, 2014, 08:01:05 AM »
A different Evening Primrose, Oenothera biennis, taken this morning after a very unseasonal overnight rain shower.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

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John J

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Re: Oenothera
« Reply #6 on: April 22, 2018, 06:06:48 PM »
Our first Evening Primroses of the year, seen from the kitchen window this evening as I went to close the blinds. Photos not brilliant as I could not use the flash, our security light came on every time I moved!
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

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Fermi

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Re: Oenothera
« Reply #7 on: April 23, 2018, 01:18:42 PM »
My favourite Evening Primrose is Oenothera acaulis.
It comes from South America and is soundly perennial in our climate.
In the evening the sparkling white flowers open and in the morning it collapses. If the weather is hot the flower simply shrivels away but if the day is cool and overcast the flower re-opens a soft pink in the evening.
These pics are from over the past few years,
cheers
fermi
Mr F de Sousa, Central Victoria, Australia
member of AGS, SRGC, NARGS
working as a physio to support my gardening habit!