Ipomoea

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Alisdair

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Ipomoea
« on: October 24, 2011, 07:09:09 AM »
To see Hilary's photo of Ipomoea x sloteri, a hybrid of I. coccinea and I. quamoclit, click here.
Alisdair Aird
Gardens in SE England (Sussex); also coastal Southern Greece, and (in a very small way) South West France; MGS member (and former president); vice chairman RHS Lily Group, past chairman Cyclamen Society

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JTh

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Re: Ipomoea
« Reply #1 on: October 15, 2013, 07:00:14 PM »
We stopped at a small nursery on our way back from Thessaloniki today, and I saw this huge climber on their fence with lots of very bright red flowers, and very nice deeply cut, dark green leaves. I had no idea what it was, I have never seen this plant before, but the flowers looked like some kind of bindweed, and I found that it must be Ipomoea x sloteri, or cardinal climber. I was told that it dies down in the winter (since it is an annual), but will usually seed itself and grows very quickly, and that they would have some small plants for sale next spring. Does anybody have any experience with this plant?
Retired veterinary surgeon by training with a PhD in parasitology,  but worked as virologist since 1992.
Member of the MGS and Branch website editor. Gardening in Oslo and to a limited extent in Halkidiki, Greece.

Jamus

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Re: Ipomoea
« Reply #2 on: October 15, 2013, 09:52:42 PM »

Yes I've grown it from seed a couple of times. It's best as a container plant here because it gets going late in the season when the weather really heats up but it likes a lot of water. It's a gorgeous plant when grown well, but more tropical or subtropical I suspect. Water stress will result in a more diminutive example, but still beautiful. There's another one with more ferny finely divided foliage which is very attractive. Ipomoea quamoclit I think it is? I've grown both and I found the one you photographed easier, but that might have just been the season.

Long hot summers, mild wet winters. Rainfall approx. 600mm pa.
Summer maximums over 40 degrees, winter minimums occasionally below freezing.
Gardening on neutral clay loam and sandy loam.

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JTh

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Re: Ipomoea
« Reply #3 on: October 16, 2013, 02:42:33 PM »
Thank you, Jamus, it sound as if it may need more water than I can provide, given that I'm not here all the time. But if I see it for sale next spring, I suppose I shan't be able to resist.
Retired veterinary surgeon by training with a PhD in parasitology,  but worked as virologist since 1992.
Member of the MGS and Branch website editor. Gardening in Oslo and to a limited extent in Halkidiki, Greece.

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Fermi

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Re: Ipomoea
« Reply #4 on: April 02, 2014, 05:22:23 AM »
Ipomaea lindheimeri is from Texas and I thought it was an annual but 2 of last year's 3 plants re-sprouted and eventually started to flower at the very end of summer,
cheers
fermi
Mr F de Sousa, Central Victoria, Australia
member of AGS, SRGC, NARGS
working as a physio to support my gardening habit!

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Alisdair

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Re: Ipomoea
« Reply #5 on: April 02, 2014, 07:29:40 AM »
Nice leaves, too.
Alisdair Aird
Gardens in SE England (Sussex); also coastal Southern Greece, and (in a very small way) South West France; MGS member (and former president); vice chairman RHS Lily Group, past chairman Cyclamen Society

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John J

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Re: Ipomoea
« Reply #6 on: June 27, 2014, 06:53:40 AM »
Earlier this year my wife sowed seed of Ipomoea tricolor 'Heavenly Blue'. This is the first one to flower.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

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Charithea

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Re: Ipomoea
« Reply #7 on: July 23, 2014, 08:54:31 AM »
Hi everybody! I am over the moon. I have succeeded in growing two Ipomoea quamoclit. They have flowered today for the first time! One brilliant red flower in each one. I shall follow David Dickinson's advice and collect the seeds when they are ready to share with others that wish to grow them. I shall make sure next year I put them in a more prominent place. John will post the photos later. I have not yet gone for my iPad lessons!!
I garden in Cyprus, in a flat old farming field, alt. approx. 30 m asl.

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John J

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Re: Ipomoea
« Reply #8 on: July 23, 2014, 09:07:50 AM »
Photos as instructed.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

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Fermi

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Re: Ipomoea
« Reply #9 on: February 11, 2015, 08:14:59 AM »
The Ipomoea lindheimeri seems to be getting stronger each year and flowering earlier as well!
This morning I took a couple of pics showing that the vines are getting higher up the supports and flowering well,
cheers
fermi
Mr F de Sousa, Central Victoria, Australia
member of AGS, SRGC, NARGS
working as a physio to support my gardening habit!

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Alisdair

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Re: Ipomoea
« Reply #10 on: February 18, 2015, 10:07:59 AM »
Interesting to have a perennial Morning Glory! It's fragrant isn't it, Fermi? And dormant in winter rather than summer?
Alisdair Aird
Gardens in SE England (Sussex); also coastal Southern Greece, and (in a very small way) South West France; MGS member (and former president); vice chairman RHS Lily Group, past chairman Cyclamen Society

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Fermi

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Re: Ipomoea
« Reply #11 on: March 05, 2015, 08:32:01 AM »
Alisdair,
sorry for the delay in replying.
I've not noticed a fragrance but I haven't stuck my nose into one for a closer inspection! Yes, it is in full growth in summer and dies to the ground in winter. It shares the trellis with sweetpeas so it seems to be a good combination, as long as I remember to remove the dead vines before the new ones start twining,
cheers
fermi
Mr F de Sousa, Central Victoria, Australia
member of AGS, SRGC, NARGS
working as a physio to support my gardening habit!

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Fermi

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Re: Ipomoea lindheimeri
« Reply #12 on: March 26, 2018, 10:26:45 AM »
In their 5th year the Ipomaea lindheimeri are still doing well.
Today was cool and cloudy so the flowers have lasted all day.
We replaced the supports last year while they were in growth and so had to retrain the vines up the metal struts. This year they have raced to the top very quickly,
cheers
fermi
Mr F de Sousa, Central Victoria, Australia
member of AGS, SRGC, NARGS
working as a physio to support my gardening habit!

Umbrian

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Re: Ipomoea
« Reply #13 on: March 27, 2018, 07:57:00 AM »
 Beautiful Fermi - and I love the supports. This year I am trying several new Ipomea and hoping for great things. Not being my forte they are one of the few things I seem to have success with from seed. So far they are germinating well and I look forward to posting 'photos in the summer.
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.

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John J

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Re: Ipomoea
« Reply #14 on: March 27, 2018, 11:13:14 AM »
We have some Ipomoea starting to flower. I believe the dark one is 'Star of Yalta' but we don't have a name for the light one.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)