Melia azedarach

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Alisdair

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Re: Melia azedarach
« Reply #15 on: May 17, 2012, 08:40:56 PM »
An Indian friend of mine in the UK's West Midlands, who imports exotic spices, found that a spray of diluted neem oil freed his lilies of lily beetle - an absolute scourge here, particularly in urban areas such as his. He kindly gave me a bottle of the oil, though out here in the country I manage to keep the lily beetle at bay by hand-picked destruction.
Alisdair Aird
Gardens in SE England (Sussex); also coastal Southern Greece, and (in a very small way) South West France; MGS member (and current president); vice chairman RHS Lily Group, past chairman Cyclamen Society

Hilary

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Re: Melia azedarach
« Reply #16 on: January 09, 2017, 06:18:06 PM »
Melia azedarach
Decorated with snow.
In the site of Ancient Corinth and near the carpark
MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

Hilary

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Re: Melia azedarach
« Reply #17 on: April 16, 2017, 10:27:39 AM »
Melia azedarach,
Pride of India, Pride of China, Persian Lilac, Bead Tree and the list goes on.
No stamp today but continuing with the Easter / Spring theme.

Several of these trees grow around Corinth and Ancient Corinth.

The first time I saw this tree was at Easter 1966, when I experienced my first Greek Easter Day feast. The tree was growing in the garden where the lamb was being cooked on the spit, hand turned none of your little motors to turn the spit then.  I was told the tree was called Paskalia. Since then I have noticed that just about anything pale purple in colour goes by the name of Paskalia

Here are a couple of photos taken last May. We had trouble finding enough wild flowers, they had all dried up,  to make our May Wreath so we were glad to come across a bushy Indian Bead tree next to the, now defunct, railway lines.
In the end most of the wreath  was made with the flowers

Melia azedarach is mentioned many times in THE MEDITERRANEAN GARDEN Issue number 25, July 2001 mentions that a Melia tree was lost after the very dry winter of 1999- 2000. I wonder if it has been replaced?
THE GARDEN AT SPAROZA by Caroline Harbouri
MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

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Charithea

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Re: Melia azedarach
« Reply #18 on: April 17, 2017, 08:02:14 AM »
Hilary, I know that there has been a lot of information posted about this tree but I feel that I must also add mine.  I love the tree, its blue-purple flowers , its scent, the visiting bees on its flowers and also that the Golden orioles perch on it, very early in the morning, when they arrive in Cyprus. Friends and relatives ask me why do I tolerate its seeds. Simple.  I don't mind it being untidy.  I get so much pleasure from all the other positive things about it.
I garden in Cyprus, in a flat old farming field, alt. approx. 30 m asl.

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Fermi

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Re: Melia azedarach
« Reply #19 on: April 23, 2017, 03:42:12 PM »
White Cedar also occurs naturally in northern Australia: https://www.anbg.gov.au/gnp/interns-2008/melia-azedarach.html
but can become a weed outside its usual range. It's used quite a lot as a street tree and in gardens in Melbourne and other parts of southern Australia
cheers
fermi
Mr F de Sousa, Central Victoria, Australia
member of AGS, SRGC, NARGS
working as a physio to support my gardening habit!

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John J

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Re: Melia azedarach
« Reply #20 on: April 23, 2017, 05:14:49 PM »
Hilary,
I'm a little late on this one, been away and still trying to catch up. Here in Cyprus the Melia is known as 'mavromata' (dark eyes), 'paskalia' is given mainly to the lilac as it flowers around Easter.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

Hilary

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Re: Melia azedarach
« Reply #21 on: April 24, 2017, 04:10:43 PM »
Fermi,
What a wonderful site for information about Australian plants.
What a shame I don't have any more Australian stamps with floral themes.
As a child I did have a 12 inch ruler, each inch a piece of wood from a different Australian tree.
I knew all the names of the trees  off by heart.
MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care