Paeonia

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John

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Paeonia
« on: October 03, 2011, 08:32:43 AM »
Just thinking back to the few Paeonia that I have seen in the wild and on our trip to Turkey last year we were fortunate to just catch Paeonia mascula at it's best. In open Cedrus libani habitat.
The last picture is in cultivation and shows how colourful the seeding plant can be. In this case P. cambessedesii.
John
Horticulturist, photographer, author, garden designer and plant breeder; MGS member and RHS committee member. I garden at home in SW London and also at work in South London.

Joanna Savage

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Re: Paeonia
« Reply #1 on: February 17, 2013, 08:02:32 AM »
Paeonia caucasica. To my great delight one of four seeds of this paeony germinated last year. It seemed to struggle and died back for winter. Now there are two lovely plump red leaves showing. It is still in a three inch pot. I would like to ask the forum expertise about when to plant it out. Immediately, in ten days or so when the frosts are over? Or should I pot it into a larger pot for the summer. Many thanks, Joanna in Toscana

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John

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Re: Paeonia
« Reply #2 on: February 17, 2013, 08:41:59 PM »
I think either would be OK. If you can keep an eye on it and not damage when weeding etc. then getting it in the ground might be the best choice.
John
Horticulturist, photographer, author, garden designer and plant breeder; MGS member and RHS committee member. I garden at home in SW London and also at work in South London.

Trevor Australis

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Re: Paeonia
« Reply #3 on: February 17, 2013, 11:11:33 PM »
I find that Peony seedlings are very resilient, so long as you remember where you planted them when weedng and digging. The only ones I have found difficult are P. brownii/ californica and P. cambessedesii. P. brownii/ californica is just impossible to please in my garden and even tho' it is scarcely anything more than interesting so far as it's browny-green flowers are concerned mt failure with it niggles at my ambition. P. cambessedesii I have grown and flowered from several sources, including seed collected on a cliff face at Torre d'Ariant, but they have not been long lived and so have been another cause of horticultural frustration. It has occurred to me that some sp. may not be very long lived perennials. Do any forum members have experience observing wild colonies in the long term? tn
M Land. Arch., B. Sp. Ed. Teacher, traveller and usually climate compatible.

Joanna Savage

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Re: Paeonia
« Reply #4 on: March 01, 2015, 12:07:21 PM »
That Paeonia caucasica mentioned above is doing famously. But how long til it flowers?

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JTh

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Re: Paeonia
« Reply #5 on: March 01, 2015, 02:57:20 PM »
Most peonies take around six years before they produce flowers, you need to be patient.
Retired veterinary surgeon by training with a PhD in parasitology,  but worked as virologist since 1992.
Member of the MGS and Branch website editor. Gardening in Oslo and to a limited extent in Halkidiki, Greece.

Trevor Australis

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Re: Paeonia
« Reply #6 on: March 03, 2015, 08:01:54 AM »
5-6 yrs would be about my experience. Do not try to force it with extra feeding as lush growth and sappy tuberous roots are not what will ensure longevity. A sunny site with some surrounding low open growth to come through in imitation of their natural habitat.
M Land. Arch., B. Sp. Ed. Teacher, traveller and usually climate compatible.

Joanna Savage

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Re: Paeonia
« Reply #7 on: April 20, 2015, 08:54:38 AM »
This blousy paeony came from my local garden centre at a knockdown price. It had no label or indication of colour. The flower is so over the top that it borders on ridiculous. I bought it in April, planted it out in October2014, so it has had one winter's growth.
It will be very interesting to see if it keeps up this exuberant flowering. I am predicting that it will now rest for a few years before coming back in a quieter form. I am wondering if this large flower has been produced with aid of some kind of flowering hormone, as are so many of the pelargoniums from the garden centres.

Joanna Savage

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Re: Paeonia
« Reply #8 on: May 11, 2016, 09:51:09 AM »
One peony plant, two different flowers. This plant came from a rather unreliable garden centre as a red flowering tree peony. I liked the red flower and thought it worth a risk, but sadly the main tree stem had died by the end of summer. However, to my delight,  this year there has been leaf growth from below the graft and now this white flower has appeared. I do not know what the rootstock might be but I am happy to have it in the garden.



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Alisdair

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Re: Paeonia
« Reply #9 on: May 12, 2016, 05:10:44 PM »
A rather nice silver lining, Joanna!
Alisdair Aird
Gardens in SE England (Sussex); also coastal Southern Greece, and (in a very small way) South West France; MGS member (and former president); vice chairman RHS Lily Group, past chairman Cyclamen Society

royscot

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Re: Paeonia
« Reply #10 on: May 12, 2016, 09:45:52 PM »
Probably lactifolia, it seems to be the usual one used.

Roy

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Fermi

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Re: Paeonia
« Reply #11 on: October 08, 2018, 03:56:38 PM »
Time to revive this thread ;D
We have a single plant of Paeonia cambessedesii which I grew from seed back in 1998.
It flowers most years but only if we don't get a late frost.
Last year was a bit tough for it and the flowers are bit small I'm afraid but at least it is alive and flowering
cheers
fermi
Mr F de Sousa, Central Victoria, Australia
member of AGS, SRGC, NARGS
working as a physio to support my gardening habit!

Umbrian

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Re: Paeonia
« Reply #12 on: October 09, 2018, 06:36:52 AM »
I should think you are well pleased with this plant after so many years- thank you for sharing it on the aforum -a lovely flower and very beautiful leaves.
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.