Nerine

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John

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Nerine
« on: September 23, 2011, 08:03:56 PM »
It's that time of year again. Though I am not a Nerine fanatic like some people I know I do have a couple. I acquired this one from Harry Hay and thought I should accept it as it is almost certainly the original clone. Harry was given this by E.B. Anderson and it is the clone that goes under this name. Harry had a lovely big clump of it at the base of a wall where despite a bit of protection it would have had to endure quite cold conditions of at least -15ÂșC. I assume it is either a selection or hybrid of N. bowdenii.
John
Horticulturist, photographer, author, garden designer and plant breeder; MGS member and RHS committee member. I garden at home in SW London and also at work in South London.

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Alisdair

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Re: Nerine
« Reply #1 on: September 24, 2011, 08:06:55 AM »
Most people seem to agree that 'E. B. Anderson' is his selection from Nerine bowdenii.
Alisdair Aird
Gardens in SE England (Sussex); also coastal Southern Greece, and (in a very small way) South West France; MGS member (and former president); vice chairman RHS Lily Group, past chairman Cyclamen Society

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Fermi

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Re: Nerine 2018
« Reply #2 on: April 14, 2018, 05:26:52 AM »
Time to revive this thread ;D
Autumn in southern Australia used to be high-lighted by nerines in flower, especially as long borders leading to the front door - sadly no longer fashionable ::)
Where we are in Central Victoria the frost levels are just enough to burn off the foliage of some varieties, especially the colourful hybrids raised from Nerine sarniensis, leading to smaller bulbs which never get to flowering size. However a few species seem impervious to the cold and Nerine rosea is particularly good in our garden
cheers
fermi
Mr F de Sousa, Central Victoria, Australia
member of AGS, SRGC, NARGS
working as a physio to support my gardening habit!

Umbrian

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Re: Nerine
« Reply #3 on: April 14, 2018, 06:23:13 AM »
Beautiful colour Fermi especially against the backdrop of rocks and the underlying grey foliage plant.
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.

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Fermi

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Re: Nerine
« Reply #4 on: April 15, 2018, 04:22:13 AM »
Thanks, Carole,
Nerine rosea is very adaptable and grows wonderfully in dry rocky parts of the garden as well as in shaded areas under Washington Thorn (Crataegus phaenopyrum) as in the last pic. The grey leaf ground cover is an artemesia, possibly Artemesia genipi (although called A. schmidtiana nana for a long time but it is not an herbaceous perennial).
Here is another frost hardy species  known here as Nerine fothergilla 'Major' though I'm told it has been lumped into N. sarniensis - which is not as hardy!
cheers
fermi
Mr F de Sousa, Central Victoria, Australia
member of AGS, SRGC, NARGS
working as a physio to support my gardening habit!

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Fermi

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Re: Nerine
« Reply #5 on: April 15, 2018, 04:40:33 AM »
Back in the 1990s I crossed the above two species, Nerine rosea and Nerine fothergilla 'Major', getting a few seedlings which were sadly neglected in a small pot of many years, though a single flower stem arose in 2005 producing a flower the size and shape of N. rosea but an orangey colour. The bulbs were liberated into the garden 2 years ago and a second stem has arisen 13 years after the first!
Probably won't make my fortune with this one but as it's hardy in our garden I'll keep growing it and keep repeating the cross and crossing the three with other nerines to hopefully increase the range of hybrids.
I believe a similar range were raised in NZ years ago but not sure of their provenance,
cheers
fermi
« Last Edit: April 15, 2018, 04:59:03 AM by Fermi »
Mr F de Sousa, Central Victoria, Australia
member of AGS, SRGC, NARGS
working as a physio to support my gardening habit!

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Fermi

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Re: Nerine
« Reply #6 on: April 18, 2018, 10:00:20 AM »
An old hybrid which is a similar colour is 'Ariel' which has wider petals and is possibly derived from Nerine sarniensis.
I got it back in the 1980s and it still is hard to get to flower consistently - from over a dozen bulbs only 2 flowers this year
cheers
fermi
Mr F de Sousa, Central Victoria, Australia
member of AGS, SRGC, NARGS
working as a physio to support my gardening habit!

Umbrian

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Re: Nerine
« Reply #7 on: April 19, 2018, 07:44:16 AM »
Your patience and application is amazing Fermi and so interesting to see your results.  A neighbour of mine in the U.K. many years ago had a stand of Nerines that were new to me at the time. They were pale pink and she gave me some but I had no success with them and never tried again. Certainly did not know they come in beautiful shades of orange that I find more attractive. As always thanks for sharing your enthusiasm with us supported by lovely photographs.
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.

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Fermi

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Re: Nerine
« Reply #8 on: April 20, 2018, 02:55:24 PM »
Thanks, Carole,
I think it may be stubbornness and forgetfulness rather than patience, though!
Here is a species I got as Nerine filifolia (dark form) a couple of years ago.
Flowering well but leaning a bit as it has been grown in shade,
cheers
fermi
Mr F de Sousa, Central Victoria, Australia
member of AGS, SRGC, NARGS
working as a physio to support my gardening habit!

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Alisdair

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Re: Nerine
« Reply #9 on: Today at 12:09:55 PM »
Very elegant flowers on that one, Fermi! Very stylish.
Alisdair Aird
Gardens in SE England (Sussex); also coastal Southern Greece, and (in a very small way) South West France; MGS member (and former president); vice chairman RHS Lily Group, past chairman Cyclamen Society