Ipomoea

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Umbrian

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Re: Ipomoea
« Reply #30 on: October 24, 2018, 06:28:53 AM »
Hadn't thought of that comparison Hilary but you are right and this plant did a good job of winding itself around the Salvia rather than just climbing as they do when planted against trellis or sticks. It is also a prolific flowerer which adds to the effect.
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.

David Dickinson

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Re: Ipomoea
« Reply #31 on: December 11, 2018, 03:11:18 AM »
On a different note but still relating to Ipomea, I noticed that the seed heads of Ipomea "Star of Yalta" (thanks for the seeds Charithea :-)) have a distinct and very rigid bend in the stems making them point to the ground. Very convenient for the seed but, given the size and weight of each seed, I wouldn't have thought this would be of any advantage to the plant as the seed would fall immediately to the ground anyway.
I have a small garden in Rome, Italy. Some open soil, some concrete, some paved. Temperatures in winter occasionally down to 0C. Summer temperatures up to 40C in the shade. There are never watering restrictions but, of course, there is little natural water for much of June, July and August.

Hilary

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Re: Ipomoea
« Reply #32 on: February 06, 2020, 08:45:00 AM »
Ipomoea, Star of Yalta

The seeds for this climber were sown in the autumn of 2018 and by April; 2019 they were producing the dark purple flower. May found the Star of Yalta climbing up a string to; hopefully, intertwine with a deep pink Bougainvillea. All was lost when our two Bougainvillea plants, the Ipomoea and the neighbour's two Bougainvillea plants came down with some horrible disease and all were chopped down and disposed of.
It seems to have done all the Bougainvillea plants good as they started sprouting new clean branches immediately.

Ipomoea Yalta is mentioned in THE MEDITERRANEAN GARDEN number 33, July 2003 in A GARDEN IN NORTH DEVON by Polly Morris

The seeds I obtained were from THE MEDITERRANEAN GARDEN SOCIETY seed exchange.
Members of the society are entitled to 10 free packets of seeds a year
To read about this programme look here
http://www.mediterraneangardensociety.org/seedlist.html
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Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

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Charithea

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Re: Ipomoea
« Reply #33 on: February 06, 2020, 06:16:35 PM »
Hilary, the Star of Yialta has such lovely Blue colour.  They seem to grow anywhere the seed falls. We had one flowering just before the heavy rains in December. They are some growing next to the jasmine, another under the Avocado tree and a few in the front garden among the Nigellas.  Try getting some seeds and regrow them.
I garden in Cyprus, in a flat old farming field, alt. approx. 30 m asl.

Hilary

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Re: Ipomoea
« Reply #34 on: February 07, 2020, 08:12:46 AM »
I have planted seeds for Ipomoea Royal Ensign. The first tiny leaves are showing
MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

David Dickinson

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Re: Ipomoea
« Reply #35 on: August 04, 2020, 01:11:13 AM »
I am spoilt for choice as to which thread to use to speak about Ipomoea alba but as I want to talk about a couple of ipomoeas, perhaps better here. First I. alba. I was introduced to this by Umbrian who very kindly sent me some seeds after I had seen her original posting in this thread. I didn't have success but, undaunted, I bought a packet of seed this year and sowed 10 seeds of which all 10 germinated. Only 3 survived and they are growing up through a red bougainvillea which has remarkably similar leaves.

The buds are slow to form as Umbrian says but when they are about to open they are fascinating in themselves. I took the photo of the young bud ("horned") and the bud about to open earlier this evening. By 20.00 the flower was fully open - my hand will give an idea of the size of the flower.

Other ipomoeas have been strange this  year. First, none of my I lutea (thanks again to Umbrian for the seeds) germinated. Then I noticed once self-sown seed coming through. That grew for a couple of weeks and then some self-sown I quamoclit appeared. In the same tub! - I was worried I would get some strange hybrids from my seeds or, worse still, infertile seeds. The blackbirds ensured that didn't happen by ripping them all out in their desperate search for food in this consistently hot period.

I thought that was the last I would see of my ipomeas when, much to my surprise I noticed one I lutea germinating in the pot where I had sown some which had failed until this hottest, driest point to germinate. On watering the tub with the original self-sown seeds in, one I lutea and 2 I quamoclit have appeared.  Ipomoea seeds sure like a baking before germinating, it seems.

Abought two weeks ago I bought a packet of red .  tricolor for 1 thinking I would try them next year and doubting they would be as red as shown on the packet. Out of curiosity I soaked some of the seeds and then put them in a pot. Within a day, in the full heat of mid-summer they had germinated! Let's see how red they are :-)
I have a small garden in Rome, Italy. Some open soil, some concrete, some paved. Temperatures in winter occasionally down to 0C. Summer temperatures up to 40C in the shade. There are never watering restrictions but, of course, there is little natural water for much of June, July and August.

David Dickinson

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Re: Ipomoea
« Reply #36 on: August 04, 2020, 01:25:36 AM »
Maybe I am tired or maybe spell-check is playing tricks on me? Anyway, I am about (see, I can spell "about" after all!) to go to bed. How "one" became "once" and  "tricolor" lost its "eye", oops, sorry "I", will remain a mystery forever.  :-[
I have a small garden in Rome, Italy. Some open soil, some concrete, some paved. Temperatures in winter occasionally down to 0C. Summer temperatures up to 40C in the shade. There are never watering restrictions but, of course, there is little natural water for much of June, July and August.

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Charithea

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Re: Ipomoea
« Reply #37 on: August 04, 2020, 10:20:37 AM »
I am able at last to post my reply regardingIpomoea alba .  They are beautiful and iIhave already mentioned my many tries to get it to grow in our garden. After the AGM in Athens last year we went to Pelio. I saw a beautiful Ipomea alba and luckily there were ripe seeds on it.  I brought them home with me and put them in a pot to make sure the slugs and snails would not eat the seedlings. The seeds germinated and I transferred them in the ground in a suitable place to climb. I duly checked them every morning and reported to John about their progress. A few seedlings died but some carried on. There were buds on the plant so i was optimistic and kept up the early morning routine. One opened But it was not the desired colour .  Somehow I have Ipomea tricolour climbing up the sticks. There are some new seedlings as you can see in the photo so maybe there will be an alba otherwise I will have to start again next year. I am posting a photo of the one I saw in Pelio.
« Last Edit: August 07, 2020, 11:50:10 AM by Charithea »
I garden in Cyprus, in a flat old farming field, alt. approx. 30 m asl.

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John J

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Re: Ipomoea
« Reply #38 on: August 04, 2020, 01:37:10 PM »
A slightly clearer photo of the flower my wife posted about.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

David Dickinson

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Re: Ipomoea
« Reply #39 on: August 06, 2020, 09:49:24 PM »
Hi Charithea

Sorry to hear of your disappointment. Thought I ought to tell you of Oran's warning to me on this forum a few years ago. Ipomea indica is a thug! I have one in a pot and so I can keep it under control. If you have one in the ground it will take over. Rooting where stems touch the ground, it seems. If you have 2,  then watch out! They could be a male and a female and then you are in for real trouble! I hope I have remembered correctly and this is not a false alarm but I would do some research , if I were you. It has certainly taken over most of the telegraph poles along the railway tracks into Naples,
I have a small garden in Rome, Italy. Some open soil, some concrete, some paved. Temperatures in winter occasionally down to 0C. Summer temperatures up to 40C in the shade. There are never watering restrictions but, of course, there is little natural water for much of June, July and August.

David Dickinson

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Re: Ipomoea
« Reply #40 on: August 06, 2020, 09:56:31 PM »
Oron's comments re Ipomea indica can be found here.

http://www.mgsforum.org/smf/index.php?topic=2175.msg14803#msg14803

I have a small garden in Rome, Italy. Some open soil, some concrete, some paved. Temperatures in winter occasionally down to 0C. Summer temperatures up to 40C in the shade. There are never watering restrictions but, of course, there is little natural water for much of June, July and August.

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Charithea

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Re: Ipomoea
« Reply #41 on: August 07, 2020, 11:47:17 AM »
Thank you for the information David. I re read Oron's reply and I will admit that I named it wrong. It should be Ipomoea tricolour.  I don't know how the seed got into the pot. I will correct the name on the previous posting.  We do have Ipomoea indica[/] climbing up a Jacaranda. We do see them climbing on hedges by the side of the high way but not many grow in the modern gardens. I got mine from my sister's friend (80+) who lives at the end of the road. She warned me of its habit but I love the colour.  I had it in a pot until this spring when it suddenly died and then I removed the pot and a tiny one appeared underneath it. I took photos of the leaves of the same plant but they are different. I called John to make sure I had not made a mistake again. Different leaves same colour flowers.
I garden in Cyprus, in a flat old farming field, alt. approx. 30 m asl.