Corokia maori

  • 6 Replies
  • 476 Views

David Dickinson

  • Hero Member
    • Email
Corokia maori
« on: July 22, 2020, 02:29:11 AM »
I saw this plant today and it was strangely attractive. No really useful information on the label. I had no idea at all about its needs. If I wasn't so stubborn about not getting a mobile phone, I could have foud out in a second this is not the plant for me. Or so it seems.

My curiosity got the better of me and I bought one. Now I read on one site "no more than 20C in summer and no less than 5C in the winter".  Another says "winter down to zone 7b". Does anybody know a country that fits the bill? Highland areas in tropical countries? Not Rome, for sure. It is from New Zealand.

Anyway, I now have a plant that I am sure to see fail over the summer. Fingers crossed I am wrong. I will keep you posted.
I have a small garden in Rome, Italy. Some open soil, some concrete, some paved. Temperatures in winter occasionally down to 0C. Summer temperatures up to 40C in the shade. There are never watering restrictions but, of course, there is little natural water for much of June, July and August.

Hilary

  • Hero Member
Re: Corokia maori
« Reply #1 on: July 22, 2020, 11:33:59 AM »
Your new plant seems like a real challenge

I have just looked in the index of the journal and both Corokia cotoneaster and Corokia buddleioides are mentioned.

You might find some useful information there
MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

*

John J

  • Hero Member
Re: Corokia maori
« Reply #2 on: July 22, 2020, 11:57:45 AM »
I recall that several years ago we bought a Corokia, can't remember which one. Like you we knew nothing about it and consequently it didn't survive for long in our summer heat that can go on for 6 months, or even longer.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

Caroline

  • Full Member
Re: Corokia maori
« Reply #3 on: July 25, 2020, 12:48:44 AM »
I have a number of Corokia in my garden, and they are pretty tough.  They survive in temperatures of 30 degrees and more, and limited watering or none in the summer. No frosts here though. Clip well and good for hedging.
I am establishing a garden on Waiheke Island, 35 minutes out of Auckland. The site is windy, the clay soil dries out quickly in summer and is like plasticine in winter, but it is still very rewarding. Water is an issue, as we depend on tanks. I'm looking forward to sharing ideas. Caroline

David Dickinson

  • Hero Member
    • Email
Re: Corokia maori
« Reply #4 on: July 26, 2020, 11:18:42 AM »
Thanks Caroline,

You have given me a little hope. Let's see what happens. I was attracted by the fact that you can see the branch structure through the foliage.  On looking it up at home I discovered that it gets lovely little yellow flowers. It was in a tiny pot and I have potted it on despite the very hot dry weather at the moment. I will give it a little water when it looks as though it needs it. Morning sun, afternoon shade until it has settled in. Fingers crossed :-)
I have a small garden in Rome, Italy. Some open soil, some concrete, some paved. Temperatures in winter occasionally down to 0C. Summer temperatures up to 40C in the shade. There are never watering restrictions but, of course, there is little natural water for much of June, July and August.

*

Charithea

  • Hero Member
Re: Corokia maori
« Reply #5 on: July 26, 2020, 02:40:51 PM »
Wish you lots of luck David.
I garden in Cyprus, in a flat old farming field, alt. approx. 30 m asl.

*

Charithea

  • Hero Member
Re: Salvias in pots
« Reply #6 on: July 27, 2020, 12:24:46 PM »
I am posting photos of Salvias again. Salvia amplexicaulis in a pot which is just flowering.  The leaves are a bit 'moth eaten' because we seem to have tiny green grass hoppers that are munching away at our flowers lately. I have sown the amplexicaulis seeds this spring in a special mixture as an experiment and it appears successful. All the other seeds in the ground of which some germinated and thrived for a while,  and all died except for one Salvia pomifera and 3 tiny Salvia roemeriana.  I also planted cuttings of other Salvias in this enriched soil, a small amount of bought potting compost with soil mixed with well matured sheep/goat manure. it does not dry out so quickly and the salvias have thrived. The second photo has one of the Salvia amistad and behind it,  the tall Salvia martinus borg which  I re-potted.
« Last Edit: July 27, 2020, 12:29:57 PM by Charithea »
I garden in Cyprus, in a flat old farming field, alt. approx. 30 m asl.