Perfumed plants

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Umbrian

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Perfumed plants
« on: April 22, 2020, 08:19:52 AM »
Was going to post about a new Calycanthus I bought last year and did a search  for 'perfumed plants' to see if there is an existing thread for them. Doesn't seem so although I noticed a similar query from me😊 some time ago......is there one? and if not could we start one?
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.

Hilary

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Re: Perfumed plants
« Reply #1 on: April 22, 2020, 08:30:43 AM »
That would be interesting
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Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

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John J

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Re: Perfumed plants
« Reply #2 on: April 22, 2020, 09:01:04 AM »
Good idea, Carole. Can I start the ball rolling with one that is in full flow at the moment, Pittosporum tobira. We have a large hedge of it and the scent as you get within metres of it is intoxicating.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

Umbrian

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Re: Perfumed plants
« Reply #3 on: April 24, 2020, 07:17:29 AM »
Here is my Calycanthus x raulstonii - bought last year rather on impulse but I love perfumed plants and fell in love with the colour of the flowers.  It settled well but did not put on any growth and I was not expecting many flowers this year. However it has surprised me with quite a few developing buds, the first of  which opened this week. The perfume is not particularly strong but the plant has that overall spicy scent that I love and the flowers are certainly attractive and a beautiful colour and so I am well satisfied with this addition.
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.

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John J

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Re: Perfumed plants
« Reply #4 on: April 24, 2020, 07:56:19 AM »
In 2003 we attended the MGS AGM in Tuscany which took in a visit to Florence. We kept saying we'd go back one day on our own to spend more time there and in the surrounding area. Eventually we made it, can't remember exactly how long ago (the memory isn't what it used to be) but the hotel we stayed in had a beautiful bush of Calycanthus floridus in the garden, in flower. It immediately became number 1 on Thea's WANT ONE list. Over the years we've tried to acquire one but never succeeded in getting a plant strong enough to establish. Recently we found another very small plant and nursed it through the hot summer, giving it it's own shade canopy. In the winter it lost all its leaves and we have been examining it minutely, ever since the weather began to warm up, for signs of life. Glad to say it is showing a bit of green and hopefully will become stronger this year with some TLC. Fingers crossed.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

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Charithea

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Re: Perfumed plants
« Reply #5 on: April 24, 2020, 01:50:02 PM »
Our Calycanthus floridus was given to us by David Dickinson. He actually travel from Rome to Frascati where we where staying to delivery a box full of plants. Thank you David again. most of them are thriving in the garden now. I made a make shift tent for the Calycanthus  last summer to protect it from the hot sun.  I have extended its canopy this year when the ground was soft by pushing high  sticks into the ground and have ready the white cloth to go on top when summer arrives.
I garden in Cyprus, in a flat old farming field, alt. approx. 30 m asl.

Umbrian

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Re: Perfumed plants
« Reply #6 on: April 25, 2020, 08:47:19 AM »
Several years ago I found a  Calycanthus floridus languishing in the bargain area of a local Viviao. I snapped it up and lavished care on it but it failed to pick up and eventually died. I was a bit wary of this new introduction as it looked a bit exotic but couldn't resist the big, unusually coloured flowers. So far so good.🤞
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.

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John J

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Re: Perfumed plants
« Reply #7 on: April 27, 2020, 05:49:07 AM »
Montanoa grandiflora, I know I have posted about this plant on other threads but the scent of the flowers and the length of flowering time are both amazing. Well worth growing if you can find it.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

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John J

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Re: Perfumed plants
« Reply #8 on: April 27, 2020, 05:53:29 AM »
Melia azedarach, another tree that has featured on the Forum over the years. Deciduous, the flowers and foliage open together in the spring. Provides early dappled shade and a gentle perfume in the spring if you have the space for it.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

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John J

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Re: Perfumed plants
« Reply #9 on: April 27, 2020, 05:57:43 AM »
Plectranthus neochilus, not a perfumed plant in the usual accepted sense as it is the foliage that has a pungent smell, so strong that many find it decidedly unpleasant.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

Umbrian

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Re: Perfumed plants
« Reply #10 on: April 27, 2020, 06:12:31 AM »
Plectranthus neochilus looks a lovely plant John - always interesting foliage on Plectranthus and that one has lovely coloured flowers. I do include plants with perfumed foliage in my love of scent in the garden- many Salvias have very strongly aromatic leaves for example which is just another asset of that wonderful genus. To run your fingers through them when passing releases some strong scents. Of course we all seem to experience scents in different ways and what one person loves another may find unpleasant.
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.

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John J

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Re: Perfumed plants
« Reply #11 on: April 27, 2020, 08:51:58 AM »
Actually, Carole, it's a bit of a thug. The scent is very strong and the plant stretches out in all directions, taking over whole areas. Fine if you have a large, difficult area to fill as it doesn't seem to be fussy about soil and takes the heat well.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

Umbrian

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Re: Perfumed plants
« Reply #12 on: April 28, 2020, 08:42:50 AM »
No good for my much smaller garden then - would have been good in the original one I created here though.
My contribution today is Choisya ternata  'Aztec Pearl' that is in full flower at the moment. Not a strong scent but sweetly pleasing and an undemanding shrub with attractive evergreen leaves and happy looking spring flowers.it is nestled underneath a rather overgrown Coronilla the flowers of which are just beginning to fade after putting on a glorious display for many weeks and seems to be saying " my turn now"

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MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.

Umbrian

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Re: Perfumed plants
« Reply #13 on: April 29, 2020, 08:41:02 AM »
Remembering the wonderful scent that permeated the garden in late February when my Daphne odora 'Aureomarginata' was in full bloom. Brought from the UK as a small plant it has thrived in a spot where afforded some shade during the hot summer months and is threatening to take over too much space. I have read that they resent too much pruning and would hate to lose it but will have to try a little curbing I think.
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.

Umbrian

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Re: Perfumed plants
« Reply #14 on: May 01, 2020, 07:17:15 AM »
Jasminum polyanthum - one of the most highly scented Jasmines. It was bought as a tiny plant, already in flower, for the house but I decided to try it in the garden once the flowering stopped. It grew away very quickly and thanks to a very mild winter and warm, even hot, early spring made big clusters of buds that are now bursting into flower. I placed it in a sheltered spot close to our front entrance gate hoping it's fragrance would welcome visitors........ needless to say that will not be happening this year so let's hope it survives at least another year.
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.