Coronavirus situation

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Hilary

  • Hero Member
Re: Coronavirus situation
« Reply #45 on: March 25, 2020, 02:45:38 PM »
Looking for something else entirely to scan I came across this photo
The  MGS excursion to Kea in 2002, what a beautiful island in the spring
Here we are on our way to ancient Karthaia 
« Last Edit: March 27, 2020, 12:53:23 PM by Alisdair »
MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

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Charithea

  • Sr. Member
Re: Coronavirus situation
« Reply #46 on: March 25, 2020, 03:03:35 PM »
The rock formation is a wonderful background for the Euphorbia dendroidis reminds me of the flora of mount Hymettos
I garden in Cyprus, in a flat old farming field, alt. approx. 30 m asl.

Hilary

  • Hero Member
Re: Coronavirus situation
« Reply #47 on: March 25, 2020, 03:11:25 PM »
i don't 't know why the photo is on its side ,it isn't on my computer (Hilary, my first attempt at fixing it failed - just as you found, it looked the right way up on my computer but then went sideways as soon as I attached it - but then I tried again with a slightly different method, and this time it worked!)
« Last Edit: March 27, 2020, 12:55:32 PM by Alisdair »
MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

*

John J

  • Hero Member
Re: Coronavirus situation
« Reply #48 on: March 26, 2020, 06:48:30 AM »
Spring seems to be arriving at last with the early morning sun shining through these Rosa banksiae 'Lutea'.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

Umbrian

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Re: Coronavirus situation
« Reply #49 on: March 26, 2020, 08:18:42 AM »
Another Narcissus today but again unfortunately label long gone.  I really should make written notes of exactly where I plant bulbs .........perhaps some research from photos during these long days of confinement ? Miserable, cold and wet here at the moment so no better time to start.
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.

Hilary

  • Hero Member
Re: Coronavirus situation
« Reply #50 on: March 26, 2020, 11:10:43 AM »
Ferula communis, Giant Fennel, Νάρθηκας

A view of Mystras with Ferula communis in the foreground

The photo was taken on a  THE MEDITERRANEAN GARDEN SOCIETY excursion on 25th April  2010.
 Many thanks to the organizers
MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

*

John J

  • Hero Member
Re: Coronavirus situation
« Reply #51 on: March 26, 2020, 11:22:29 AM »
Thea said I had to take photos of her Salvia indica and post them as they reminded her of orchids.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

David Dickinson

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Re: Coronavirus situation
« Reply #52 on: March 26, 2020, 11:34:36 AM »
I agree with Charithea re "reminding her of orchids" (Salvia indica)The plants that grew from the seeds you both sent me are coming up again and the flower heads are forming nicely, so I have something nice to look forward to when the rain and the cool weather finally leave us and spring will be truly here for us in Italy too. Thanks again for the seeds :-)
I have a small garden in Rome, Italy. Some open soil, some concrete, some paved. Temperatures in winter occasionally down to 0C. Summer temperatures up to 40C in the shade. There are never watering restrictions but, of course, there is little natural water for much of June, July and August.

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John J

  • Hero Member
Re: Coronavirus situation
« Reply #53 on: March 27, 2020, 06:43:36 AM »
Our Montanoa grandiflora has not only been flowering for weeks but the sweet scent is amazing.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

Umbrian

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Re: Coronavirus situation
« Reply #54 on: March 27, 2020, 07:51:28 AM »
Life is not difficult just for us at the moment - here the long weeks of unseasonal warm, sunny days have ended. Skies are heavy and grey with rain, the occasional flurry of snow and cold winds. The Blackbirds who built a nest in the Trachelospermum just outside the front door are frantically trying to care for a baby that has left the nest and ended up on a pile of soggy leaves close to some tall planters. It appears to be the only fledging and their attention is fascinating to watch. The hen bird seems quite distraught and constantly wanders about the small area of garden looking lost whilst the male is keeping the baby fed. These two had become very tame since building the nest arriving for food that I put  out whenever they heard the door open, the hen would even come and take crumbs from the table when I was sitting there. Now they are both more wary.
I monitored the situation all day yesterday and placed an old basket close to the baby in such a position that it could get protection from the wind and rain and was relieved to see that it did indeed do this. The male was very wary for a time about approaching to feed but finally took courage and normal service was resumed. Happily this morning the baby is still there - looking very bedraggled but alive. It is unfortunate that its first attempt at flight when leaving the nest saw it land up on the steps at the start of the path leading to the front door and it does not seem to have the strength to take refuge in the garden area to the right where there are various shrubs and plants under which it would be far safer.
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.

Umbrian

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Re: Coronavirus situation
« Reply #55 on: March 27, 2020, 07:53:15 AM »
Here is a photo - pressed post prematurely
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.

Hilary

  • Hero Member
Re: Coronavirus situation
« Reply #56 on: March 27, 2020, 03:05:59 PM »
One of my ambitions in sending these posts to the Forum is to have referred to all the contributors to the journal of THE MEDITERRANEAN GARDEN, both writers of the articles and the artists who do the drawings. In addition, I would like to have referred to every single article, not always so easy, while olive trees, thyme and lavender are easily dealt with there are other subjects which are not so easy and take some imagination

This thread is just the place to sing the praises of the, so far, unsung heroes.

In THE MEDITERRANEAN GARDEN number 90, October 2017, Yvonne Barton gives advice on
OPENING THE GARDEN TO VISITORS

She mentions in a paragraph named THE NAME OF THE ROSE that it is a good idea to have a crib sheet of the names of the various plants

Here are a few photos of roses of which I actually know the name, usually I just name them pink, white or red
Rosa Cocktail seen in Sparta
Rosa Belle Symphonie seen in Madrid
Rosa New Dawn seen in Loutraki
Rosa Rhapsody in Blue seen in Hyde Hall Gardens
Rosa Zephirine Drouhin seen in the North East of England very many years ago

I have not referred to this article before as far as I know

MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

*

John J

  • Hero Member
Re: Coronavirus situation
« Reply #57 on: March 27, 2020, 04:25:33 PM »
Regular forumers may be aware of my particular fondness for endemics, especially Cyprus ones, and/or vulnerable and endangered ones. Many of the ones that I have managed to acquire are either annuals or that disappear for long periods before, hopefully, reappearing the following year. It's always a nail-biting time waiting for those first signs of life around the period that individual ones are due to make their entrance. One such is the Nigella ciliaris that we were given seeds of by a friend a few years ago. This is not a Cyprus endemic, and in fact I believe it is fairly common in Syria and Israel, but it is very rare here on the island. The Red Data Book of Cyprus says of it; In Cyprus it was recorded at 2 locations: Amathounta (in 1862) and Rizokarpaso (in 1880 and 1912). Not recorded again, apart from in a garden in Polemidia in 1987. Although not collected for many years, further study is advisable before it is classified as extinct, on the grounds of insufficient searching and its narrow global distribution. It may even be an extinct casual.
So one of the bright lights in this isolation time has been to watch the progress of these plants as they have appeared and grown to the point of producing their first flower of the season.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

Caroline

  • Full Member
Re: Coronavirus situation
« Reply #58 on: March 27, 2020, 11:05:54 PM »
Great photo!
I am establishing a garden on Waiheke Island, 35 minutes out of Auckland. The site is windy, the clay soil dries out quickly in summer and is like plasticine in winter, but it is still very rewarding. Water is an issue, as we depend on tanks. I'm looking forward to sharing ideas. Caroline

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Charithea

  • Sr. Member
Re: Coronavirus situation
« Reply #59 on: March 28, 2020, 01:47:29 PM »
Hilary,  the roses look beautiful. I have found it hard to choose which was the best among them. These two weeks of 'isolation' meant no going for fresh vegetables. I was forced to relay on our herbs and vegetables, and fruit. The mint has been invaluable for making tea. so here are some of the photos taken on my ipad. Australian silver beet that my Aussie nephew brought for me, last crop of avocados, marjoram oreganum, mint which is normally used here to make Easter cheese and egg  pasties, and parsley.
I garden in Cyprus, in a flat old farming field, alt. approx. 30 m asl.