Ruellia brittoniana

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John

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Ruellia brittoniana
« on: September 06, 2011, 08:55:31 AM »
I assume I have the species right. I have seen this occasionally here and there and thought it was particularly attractive especially when in full flower. It seems to have a long flowering period. This was taken at the end of the season in Pano Elounda, a little old village in eastern Crete. It was growing out of the cracks in the road edge against some steps. This could imply that it could become a troublesome weed in some situations. I believe it also comes in quite a range of colours.
John
Horticulturist, photographer, author, garden designer and plant breeder; MGS member and RHS committee member. I garden at home in SW London and also at work in South London.

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oron peri

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Re: Ruellia brittoniana
« Reply #1 on: September 06, 2011, 11:15:48 AM »
Yes The name is right, Ruellia brittoniana, the one in the photo is the species it self which can get to 1m and often a real pest in the garden,as it will seeds its self in every crack, between pavment ets.
In the last 8 years or so there is a dwarf vraiety 'Texas superstar' which is beautifull, it doesnt seeds it self freely,
about 40cm,bigger flowers in Pink, White and Purple.
It blooms in 2-3 waves that last long time.
« Last Edit: September 08, 2011, 06:43:23 AM by oron peri »
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Living and gardening in Tivon, Lower Galilee region, North Israel.
Min temp 5c Max 42c, around 450mm rain.

ezeiza

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Re: Ruellia brittoniana
« Reply #2 on: September 07, 2011, 12:42:07 AM »
John, do you have a photo of the foliage and/or habit?

The plant we grow here in Argentina, in three colors, is a real thug, growing without much water but it also adapts very well to growing in ponds with wet feet. It flowers during 7 or more months non stop but never sets seed, increasing rapidly by clumping.

Chantal

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Re: Ruellia brittoniana
« Reply #3 on: September 07, 2011, 08:29:26 AM »
I love this plant, but I was nearly sure that on the RHS data base, they called it Ruellia tweediana. Did they changed recently ?
Anyway, in my garden, I only got one seedling from the parent plant. I suppose I have too cold winters here in Montpellier.
The flowering season in 2010 was from july to october. This year it flowered with 2 weeks in advance in june. If I have time I try to send a picture of the flowers and the foliage.
Chantal Guiraud
Montpellier-France
MGS Seed Coordinator

"The flowers of spring are winter's dreams told in the morning at the table of the angels" (Khalil Gibran)

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John

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Re: Ruellia brittoniana
« Reply #4 on: September 07, 2011, 08:31:56 AM »
Yes I have this one.
John
Horticulturist, photographer, author, garden designer and plant breeder; MGS member and RHS committee member. I garden at home in SW London and also at work in South London.

ezeiza

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Re: Ruellia brittoniana
« Reply #5 on: September 07, 2011, 11:13:11 PM »
Many thanks, John.

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Alisdair

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Re: Ruellia brittoniana
« Reply #6 on: September 23, 2011, 04:54:34 PM »
Kew currently view R. brittoniana as a synonym of R. simplex. ???
Alisdair Aird
Gardens in SE England (Sussex); also coastal Southern Greece, and (in a very small way) South West France; MGS member (and former president); vice chairman RHS Lily Group, past chairman Cyclamen Society

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psroseguy

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Re: Ruellia brittoniana
« Reply #7 on: October 02, 2019, 07:52:17 PM »
I was going to start a new thread but looking back through archives I see this one has been broached in the not distant passed.

I find Ruellias quite easy, pest free and forgiving here. They are of course invasive in some areas. Fortunately this is not a problem in this climate.

Here are some recent pics of those rebounding after a challenging Summer.

The pink is a recent acquisition borrowed from a public planting. These root quite easily.

Lifelong Gardener, native Californian, residing in Rancho Mirage near Palm Springs, CA for the past 25 years

Retired from the nursery industry. I've been playing at hybridizing roses for fun and profit since about 2000. Graduate Horticulture program Cal Poly San Luis Obispo 1982.

Umbrian

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Re: Ruellia brittoniana
« Reply #8 on: October 03, 2019, 06:38:43 AM »
Nice plant and anything that is a survivor is surely welcome when gardening in difficult situations, both climate and soil wise.
So good to have a new, knowledgeable and enthusiastic  poster😊
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.

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Alisdair

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Re: Ruellia brittoniana
« Reply #9 on: October 03, 2019, 08:23:20 AM »
Interesting - I've never seen a pink one in a European mediterranean garden (and as Carole says, it's great to have you on board!)
Alisdair Aird
Gardens in SE England (Sussex); also coastal Southern Greece, and (in a very small way) South West France; MGS member (and former president); vice chairman RHS Lily Group, past chairman Cyclamen Society

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John J

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Re: Ruellia brittoniana
« Reply #10 on: October 03, 2019, 04:41:15 PM »
I believe the accepted name of this plant is now Ruellia simplex with R. brittoniana being a synonym. Whatever it is called it is very useful as it seeds itself around our property freely. Any that appear in inconvenient spots can easily be removed.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

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psroseguy

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Re: Ruellia brittoniana
« Reply #11 on: October 03, 2019, 05:43:28 PM »
John, I agree.

I appreciate foundlings and being able to easily remove those that don't fit long term.

Sometimes it's fun just to let them progress till they they get too large and then let the area go fallow or make room for others.

I generally prefer to," go with the flow".  Happy accidents are always welcome.  :)


Alisdair, the pinks are not common here as yet. I also happened on a specimen of 'Katie Pink' yesterday and pruned it discreetly.  ;)

These dwarfs are quite welcome. I also have the original 'Katie Blue' which is much easier to deal with in most instances. The blue self seeds true to type which is surprising for such a dwarf plant. It has proven somewhat stoloniferous in favored locations which I find a nice feature.

Attempting to post a public photo borrowed from the internet to illustrate.



Lifelong Gardener, native Californian, residing in Rancho Mirage near Palm Springs, CA for the past 25 years

Retired from the nursery industry. I've been playing at hybridizing roses for fun and profit since about 2000. Graduate Horticulture program Cal Poly San Luis Obispo 1982.