Yellow flowered fleshy-leaved climber [IDd as Senecio angulatus by David Bracey]

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MikeHardman

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This is quite common, at least in the western half of Cyprus.
But I have yet to find out what it is; please help!
Senecio relative?
« Last Edit: December 02, 2011, 08:47:18 AM by Alisdair »
Mike
Geologist by Uni training, IT consultant, Referee for Viola for Botanical Society of the British Isles, commissioned author and photographer on Viola for RHS (Enc. of Perennials, The Garden, The Plantsman).
I garden near Polis, Cyprus, 100m alt., on marl, but have gardened mainly in S.England

David Bracey

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Re: Yellow flowered fleshy-leaved climber, Senecio relative?
« Reply #1 on: November 30, 2011, 09:54:41 PM »
Senecio angulatus
MGS member.

 I have gardened in sub-tropical Florida, maritime UK, continental Europe and the Mediterranean basin, France. Of the 4 I have found that the most difficult climate for gardening is the latter.

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John J

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Re: Yellow flowered fleshy-leaved climber, Senecio relative?
« Reply #2 on: December 01, 2011, 05:49:57 AM »
I've always considered this to be Senecio mikianoides, Mike. I believe it may have been renamed recently as Delairea odorata but I'm willing to be proven wrong.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

Hilary

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Re: Yellow flowered fleshy-leaved climber, Senecio relative?
« Reply #3 on: December 01, 2011, 07:13:07 AM »
After many happy hours surfing the net I had decided this was Senecio tamoides, am I wrong.
It grows over many walls here in Corinth and makes many a dull day jolly
MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

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MikeHardman

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Thanks for your posts, folks.

David - thanks.

John - Senecio mikanioides (Delairea odorata) barely has any petals, unlike the plant in my photo and that of Hilary.
See photo on Wikipedia.

Hilary - S. tamoides
"Senecio tamoides has been misapplied in Australia and is currently considered to be Senecio angulatus."
(Western Australian Herbarium (2007-09-11). "Senecio angulatus L.f.". FloraBase. Government of Western Australia. Retrieved 2008-03-31)
But I can't see how to differentiate it from S. angulatus. Did you find a useful criterion?
I do notice that the petals on your plant are much broader (relative to length) than on mine.

Both names are 'accepted' in The Plant List.
« Last Edit: December 01, 2011, 08:24:03 AM by MikeHardman »
Mike
Geologist by Uni training, IT consultant, Referee for Viola for Botanical Society of the British Isles, commissioned author and photographer on Viola for RHS (Enc. of Perennials, The Garden, The Plantsman).
I garden near Polis, Cyprus, 100m alt., on marl, but have gardened mainly in S.England

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John J

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Granted the photo on Wikipedia shows flowers with very little petal but several other web-sites, http://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/senecio_mikanioides.htm, for example show a completely different flower form. Another case of who do we believe?
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

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Fleur Pavlidis

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On the New South Wales government web site the three names are mentioned. The first is under the section on weeds:

Cape ivy (Delairea odorata, formerly Senecio mikanioides )
Cape ivy is a non-woody vine with thin but slightly fleshy, glossy leaves with angular lobes. The flowers are yellow and daisy-like, but lacking conspicuous petals, sweet-scented, and are produced in winter or early spring. Seed is small, with a "parachute" of fine hairs to assist its dispersal.
Look-alikes:
Two species of weedy climbing groundsel occur in the region. Senecio tamoides is very similar to cape ivy, with smaller, slightly thicker angular leaves and much showier sweetly scented yellow flowers with long petals. Senecio angulatus is a more robust plant with stiff scrambling stems and smaller, much thicker, fleshier leaves and yellow petalled flowers.
You can see the photos here:
http://www.esc.nsw.gov.au/weeds/Sheets/vines/V%20Cape%20ivy.htm

MGS member, Greece. I garden in Attica, Greece and Mt Goulinas (450m) Central Greece

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MikeHardman

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Thanks Fleur - v. useful. That IDs mine as S. angulatus - just like David said :)
Mike
Geologist by Uni training, IT consultant, Referee for Viola for Botanical Society of the British Isles, commissioned author and photographer on Viola for RHS (Enc. of Perennials, The Garden, The Plantsman).
I garden near Polis, Cyprus, 100m alt., on marl, but have gardened mainly in S.England

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John J

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Several years ago this plant appeared in the northern boundary hedge of our property. I tentatively identified it as Senecio mikanioides from photos on several web-sites including the Top Tropicals one I posted earlier. As it was an 'invader' and not something I had deliberately planted I had no reason to question this or pursue it further until now with the posting of other web pages that clearly show a completely different plant. I would certainly be happy to concede that it is Senecio angulatus. A timely reminder that you never stop learning and that you should be prepared to question what you find on the Internet, it isn't infallible.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

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MikeHardman

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Good little discussion!
Mike
Geologist by Uni training, IT consultant, Referee for Viola for Botanical Society of the British Isles, commissioned author and photographer on Viola for RHS (Enc. of Perennials, The Garden, The Plantsman).
I garden near Polis, Cyprus, 100m alt., on marl, but have gardened mainly in S.England

Hilary

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We noticed this bright yellow flowering climber covering a wire fence a couple of weeks ago near the local street market.
Since it was such a sunny day today I decided to go and take some snaps of it.
Then, when I eventually remembered its name, I found that we had discussed it at length a while back.
As I have made the effort I thought I would post these snaps taken today anyway
MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

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Alisdair

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Very cheery pictures, Hilary; thank you  :)
Alisdair Aird
Gardens in SE England (Sussex); also coastal Southern Greece, and (in a very small way) South West France; MGS member (and former president); vice chairman RHS Lily Group, past chairman Cyclamen Society

David Dickinson

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I was looking again at a plant which I have and trying to identify it. I came up with either Senecio angulatus or S. tamoides.  Then I came here to see if I could find help and came upon this old thread. Does anybody have any more recent information? The plant list has both names as "accepted" but not, as far as I can see, as synonyms. Plants Africa only lists S tamoides. http://pza.sanbi.org/ The description given by Fleur 01.12.2011 suggests mine is S angulatus. The 2 species are not identifiable (at least by me) from photos given on various sites.
I have a small garden in Rome, Italy. Some open soil, some concrete, some paved. Temperatures in winter occasionally down to 0C. Summer temperatures up to 40C in the shade. There are never watering restrictions but, of course, there is little natural water for much of June, July and August.