Dry winter.

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Umbrian

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Dry winter.
« on: March 24, 2019, 08:02:07 AM »
Glad to see your garden blooming after winter rainfall John and Charithea. Here in Italy we have had a very mild and dry winter and the arrival of spring has seen temperatures rising quickly and still no rain. I am getting worried and frustrated having undertaken some remedial work in a friend's garden but feel unable to replant in such conditions as he is not in full time residence and ensuring new plantings are kept sufficiently moist would be a problem.
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.

Umbrian

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Re: Dry winter.
« Reply #1 on: May 25, 2019, 06:14:56 AM »
We  are certainly paying for our mild and dry winter with weeks of stormy wet weather and below normal temperatures. Almost every day brings periods of torrential rain with very little sunshine. Most things in the garden are coping well except for the abundant blooms on my roses that have become soggy balls of petals.
Plants from seed have suffered the most though with the wildly fluctuating temperatures. I always grow a selection of Ipomea  from seed finding them easy and rewarding but this year, after germinating, they have remained small mostly with just one pair of secondary leaves and now are producing flower buds at the growing ( non growing!) point. One purple one produced a small flower and then promptly withered away.
Oh the joys of gardening.......
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.

Umbrian

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Re: Dry winter.
« Reply #2 on: June 13, 2019, 06:10:46 AM »
Well we are certainly paying for the excessive rainfall we received throughout most of May. Many things grew much bigger than normal and now with a sudden rise in temperatures, that are well above the norm for early June, are beginning to suffer. I have been firmly committed to planting suitable subjects for the climate, only watering during the establishment period and then relying on my choices to ensure success however this year I have felt obliged to lend a hand to certain things with a deep watering occasionally. The soil I garden in now after a move is very free draining and I find myself regretting the loss of the heavier clay that used to be bone of contention involving hours of backbreaking work during preparation before planting.
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.

David Dickinson

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Re: Dry winter.
« Reply #3 on: June 13, 2019, 11:09:07 AM »
Hi Umbrian.  Exactly the same situation here in Rome re seeds. Disastrous year :-( Widely/wildly fluctuating temperatures prevented many seeds from germinating at all.  Crepis rubra, which should have germinated in February and be setting seed now only germinated about 10 days ago. And then I only got 5 seedlings. Then from an average daily temperature of low 20s centigrade with cloud we jumped to low 30s with full sun within 2 or 3 days, Needless to say, said seedlings frazzled. Similar story with Ipomeas but at least I have one or two plants established of a couple of types. Other seeds, not a murmur. Tithonia rotundifolia germinated and rotted in waves with the cold and torrential rain. My last seed sprouted a week ago and, with the summer heat we are having, should survive. One plant out of about 20 seeds. :-( I could go on and on but I think you get the picture. A terrible year for seeds.
I have a small garden in Rome, Italy. Some open soil, some concrete, some paved. Temperatures in winter occasionally down to 0C. Summer temperatures up to 40C in the shade. There are never watering restrictions but, of course, there is little natural water for much of June, July and August.

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Charithea

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Re: Dry winter.
« Reply #4 on: June 13, 2019, 03:46:56 PM »
Carole and David, I feel for you.  That is what happens normally here when Spring arrives and a few weeks later summer temperatures follow and the seedlings burn.  I try every year to get the seeds in in the Autumn, but as I mentioned before we had an exceptional wet winter and my Botanic Garden Trial seedlings  got waterlogged and died. Only 6 types survived.  The Salvia  seedlings survived but now need daily watering until they get big and strong.  David you can be happy because our Tithonia rotundifolia is getting ready to flower, the Ipomea blue ensign flowered, Emilia coccinea is doing well and others.  Thank you for those seeds.  I almost forgot to mention that the Salvia cuttings especially the Salvia Guaranitica  ones which I thought died seem to have re - sprouted.  Good luck to both of you with the rest of the summer gardening.
I garden in Cyprus, in a flat old farming field, alt. approx. 30 m asl.