North American Wildflowers

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Fermi

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North American Wildflowers
« on: January 07, 2019, 05:15:55 AM »
Initially Ipomopsis rubra is a slow growing rosette which suddenly shoots up to flower in orangey-red tubular blooms, good for any humming-birds that might be blown off course and end up here ;D
cheers
fermi
Mr F de Sousa, Central Victoria, Australia
member of AGS, SRGC, NARGS
working as a physio to support my gardening habit!

David Dickinson

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Re: North American Wildflowers
« Reply #1 on: January 10, 2019, 12:01:41 AM »
Your posting inspired me to get seeds which I managed to find at https://www.plant-world-seeds.com/store/view_seed_item/5989. Thanks Fermi and wish me luck :)
I have a small garden in Rome, Italy. Some open soil, some concrete, some paved. Temperatures in winter occasionally down to 0C. Summer temperatures up to 40C in the shade. There are never watering restrictions but, of course, there is little natural water for much of June, July and August.

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Fermi

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Re: North American Wildflowers
« Reply #2 on: December 03, 2019, 02:34:48 PM »
Another wildflower from California is the "Thimble Flower", Gilia capitata.
These are third or fourth generation plants from seed originally from a correspondent in California
cheers
fermi
Mr F de Sousa, Central Victoria, Australia
member of AGS, SRGC, NARGS
working as a physio to support my gardening habit!

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Fermi

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Re: North American Wildflowers
« Reply #3 on: December 11, 2019, 03:45:01 AM »
I think this is Erigeron trifidus which might be perennial but my first experience with it was that it came up in a pot with something else and died after flowering and setting seed. This plant has not died (yet) since setting seed and so may actually perenniate!
It's a tiny thing and really only suited to troughs or pots,
cheers
fermi
Mr F de Sousa, Central Victoria, Australia
member of AGS, SRGC, NARGS
working as a physio to support my gardening habit!

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Fermi

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Re: North American Wildflowers
« Reply #4 on: January 06, 2020, 01:46:17 PM »
Townsendia parryi is actually a biennial but I thought I'd include it here ;D
We got this 3 weeks ago at our AGS Vic Group's annual "Bunfight" or Plant Swap. It was grown by one of our younger members and his wife - very good growers and hope for the future  8)
I hope it sets seed so that I can keep it going
cheers
fermi
Mr F de Sousa, Central Victoria, Australia
member of AGS, SRGC, NARGS
working as a physio to support my gardening habit!

Umbrian

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Re: North American Wildflowers
« Reply #5 on: January 07, 2020, 07:30:02 AM »
That looks like a very interesting and worthy addition to any garden Fermi - and how good to hear you have some keen young gardners in your area. I am currently working on a project with a very enthusiastic young Italian gardener and her thirst for knowledge is so rewarding.  As you say, hope for the future.......
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.

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Alisdair

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Re: North American Wildflowers (sorry for going a bit off-topic!)
« Reply #6 on: January 07, 2020, 01:11:11 PM »
I agree with Carole, Fermi, looks a super little plant (and great news about its grower). Couldn't help noticing it's named after Charles Parry, the 19th-century surgeon who discovered and collected many plants in the mountains of southern California and along the Mexican border. Among them is my favourite lily, the Lemon Lily from southern California and Arizona (I'm sure it would grow well for Fermi, but I doubt if many other mediterranean gardeners would find it suited them!). So it is at least a "North American Wildflower". Delicious gentle scent, and elegant. This one was grown from RHS Lily Group seed.
Alisdair Aird
Gardens in SE England (Sussex); also coastal Southern Greece, and (in a very small way) South West France; MGS member (and former president); vice chairman RHS Lily Group, past chairman Cyclamen Society