Caryopteris

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David Dickinson

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Caryopteris
« on: February 02, 2020, 11:40:41 AM »
Hi Everybody

I just did a search on the Forum for this plant and there doesn't seem to be a single posting. Somebody must grow it as there were  at one time seeds of Caryopteris x clandonensis 'Heavenly Blue' on offer via Chantal and the MGS seed bank. They didn't germinate for me - perhaps being a hybrid the seeds were not fertile?

If it is as drought, heat and cold resistant as I have read it is, I would have thought it would have been in everybody's garden. Unfortunately, I don't have a photo to show you of the magnificent display of flowers I saw in Clisshold Park, London last September. I have tried in vain to grow various types of Ceanothus and I am going to experiment with Caryopteris as a substitute. 3 small plants of Caryopteris x clandonensis 'Heavenly Blue' arrived last week. Any tips on what, and what not, to do?
I have a small garden in Rome, Italy. Some open soil, some concrete, some paved. Temperatures in winter occasionally down to 0C. Summer temperatures up to 40C in the shade. There are never watering restrictions but, of course, there is little natural water for much of June, July and August.

David Dickinson

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Re: Caryopteris
« Reply #1 on: February 02, 2020, 11:44:31 AM »
Ignore the part in my last message where I said there were no postings on the Forum. A second search has thrown up quite a few. I was obviously doing my search on one page and not the whole Forum. Still, if you have any suggestions re. care I would love to hear from you :-)
I have a small garden in Rome, Italy. Some open soil, some concrete, some paved. Temperatures in winter occasionally down to 0C. Summer temperatures up to 40C in the shade. There are never watering restrictions but, of course, there is little natural water for much of June, July and August.

Umbrian

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Re: Caryopteris
« Reply #2 on: February 03, 2020, 08:52:21 AM »
I have grown Caryopteris both in my original garden in Italy where the soil was heavy stony clay, and also in my present garden where I am blessed with good friable soil. However I have been disappointed in both cases. They have never put on the kind of flowering display I know they are capable of and I have put it down to the high summer temperatures we enjoy. Nevertheless they are survivors and the low, rather gaunt subjects they grew into were particularly useful additions to my former garden. Here, where space is limited I am not so sure!
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.

David Dickinson

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Re: Caryopteris
« Reply #3 on: February 03, 2020, 11:36:39 AM »
Thanks Carole. The ones I saw in London were simply full of flowers and with hoards of bees around them. Is yours 'Heavenly Blue'? Your reply might hold the answer as to why I have not seen Caryopteris grown locally.
I have a small garden in Rome, Italy. Some open soil, some concrete, some paved. Temperatures in winter occasionally down to 0C. Summer temperatures up to 40C in the shade. There are never watering restrictions but, of course, there is little natural water for much of June, July and August.

Umbrian

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Re: Caryopteris
« Reply #4 on: February 04, 2020, 08:00:44 AM »
Really can't remember David and my present one was a volunteer from the original plant which may go some way to explain why it is little better despite improved growing conditions.
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.

David Dickinson

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Re: Caryopteris
« Reply #5 on: February 17, 2020, 10:25:00 AM »
I had a look at my Caryoteris 'Heavenly Blue' today thinking it will soon be time to plant them up. I noticed that all three of them were developing roots in woody parts in several places where they were branching. The plant would seem to be a prime candidate for cuttings.
I have a small garden in Rome, Italy. Some open soil, some concrete, some paved. Temperatures in winter occasionally down to 0C. Summer temperatures up to 40C in the shade. There are never watering restrictions but, of course, there is little natural water for much of June, July and August.

Umbrian

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Re: Caryopteris
« Reply #6 on: February 18, 2020, 08:33:09 AM »
Very strange David - but with the weather as is at the moment many strange things seem to be happening. It will be interesting to see if pieces such as those in the photo do make good new plants.
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.