Lost label ID'd eventually by David Dickinson as Eucalyptus camphora

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Umbrian

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Can anyone identify this shrub I bought recently at the Lucca flower show?
I chose it for its habit and attractive blue/green leaves  feeling that foliage is as important in a garden as flowers. I shall cherish it regardless but would like to know its name'
I seem to remember that 'eucalyptus ' featured somewhere in the conversation I had with the vendor regarding suitability and hardiness etc.
« Last Edit: September 27, 2018, 07:53:16 AM by Alisdair »
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.

JayB

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Re: Lost label
« Reply #1 on: September 23, 2018, 09:04:38 AM »
Could it be Mterosideros Excelsa or another variant?
G'day from an Aussie in Spain. Currently attempting a total garden overhaul.

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Alisdair

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Re: Lost label
« Reply #2 on: September 23, 2018, 10:25:35 AM »
Or try Eucalyptus cinerea?
Alisdair Aird
Gardens in SE England (Sussex); also coastal Southern Greece, and (in a very small way) South West France; MGS member (and former president); vice chairman RHS Lily Group, past chairman Cyclamen Society

Caroline

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Re: Lost label
« Reply #3 on: September 23, 2018, 10:40:52 PM »
Definitely not any metrosideros I know - the leaves look too glaucous.  I would go for the juvenile form of one of the eucalyptus.  The leaves will elongate when it gets bigger. To keep it a reasonable size (and the leaves like this), it will need hard pruning every three or four years.  The plus is great firewood from the prunings.
I am establishing a garden on Waiheke Island, 35 minutes out of Auckland. The site is windy, the clay soil dries out quickly in summer and is like plasticine in winter, but it is still very rewarding. Water is an issue, as we depend on tanks. I'm looking forward to sharing ideas. Caroline

JayB

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Re: Lost label
« Reply #4 on: September 24, 2018, 08:13:27 AM »
It looks a lot like the metrosideros they sell here. Here is one from a quick search.
http://www.florpagano.com/en/product/3/1/766/metrosideros-excelsa-diam-24

The tell will be if the stems are soft and malleable, if you can bend them almost back on to each other it is likely a metrosideros. It's hard to tell from the photo and my first thought was E. gunnii but it kinda does look much softer than a Euc. A Euc should still have some firmness to the stems.
G'day from an Aussie in Spain. Currently attempting a total garden overhaul.

Umbrian

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Re: Lost label
« Reply #5 on: September 25, 2018, 07:04:23 AM »
Many thanks for all the suggestions regarding my plant - I am leaning towards a Metrosideros because although I remember eucalyptus being mentioned it was definitely not as the genus of the plant i.e. not " Eucalyptus........?"
I really must be more attentive when selecting because some pots were definitely labelled, however, in my desire to choose what I considered that best specimen I obviously chose one that was not.  Not the first time this has happened when seeing something unfamiliar......
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.

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Alisdair

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Re: Lost label
« Reply #6 on: September 25, 2018, 07:55:07 AM »
Carole, do bear in mind that Caroline is surrounded by Metrosideros! But of course when it finally flowers you'll know at last for certain....
Alisdair Aird
Gardens in SE England (Sussex); also coastal Southern Greece, and (in a very small way) South West France; MGS member (and former president); vice chairman RHS Lily Group, past chairman Cyclamen Society

Caroline

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Re: Lost label
« Reply #7 on: September 25, 2018, 10:37:56 PM »
I just went outside into the teeth of the gale  ;) and inspected the nearest Metrosideros.  Can now say with even more certainty that Carole's plant is likely to be a Eucalypt.  The giveaway is that the leaves clasp the stem, while the pohutukawa tree I looked at has the leaves on small stalks.  Plus the leaves on Carole's plant curve up, while pohutukawa leaves curve down.  On the plus side, it is likely to flower earlier than a pohutukawa, which can take up to 20 years...
I am establishing a garden on Waiheke Island, 35 minutes out of Auckland. The site is windy, the clay soil dries out quickly in summer and is like plasticine in winter, but it is still very rewarding. Water is an issue, as we depend on tanks. I'm looking forward to sharing ideas. Caroline

Umbrian

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Re: Lost label
« Reply #8 on: September 26, 2018, 06:15:36 AM »
Hi Caroline - that really was beyond the call of duty to venture out in a gale to inspect your plants regarding my identification problem! - thank you. I have decided to keep an open mind for now because the leaves are definitely on short stalks. However although coming from multiple woody base stems those of the taller growth are very supple - perhaps because it is a young plant?
David is hoping to go to another plant fair close to Rome in October where he will try to find the vendor from whom I bought the plant - we remember him but not his name - it was at the end of a long, hot day......
My greatest concern is to plant it in a suitable place since I believe most Eucalyptus grow both big and fast......although some can be pruned to keep small....with smaller leaves?
Really must learn to be more diligent over names and labels my memory is not what it used to be...... :(
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.

JayB

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Re: Lost label
« Reply #9 on: September 26, 2018, 11:22:18 AM »
I would put money on this being a Metrosideros. Especially if the growth is really supple, I can't go to a garden center here without tripping over the things and they are commonly planted out as hedging.
In Spain they sell them as M. excelsa although that does not necessarily mean they are excelsa. It could be a variety grown more for our climate or it could be a thomasii or variant. Either way it is no Euc.
G'day from an Aussie in Spain. Currently attempting a total garden overhaul.

Umbrian

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Re: Lost label
« Reply #10 on: September 27, 2018, 07:19:16 AM »
So pleased to have generated a lively discussion over the identity of my lost label plant!
My good friend David Dickinson has come up with Eucalyptus camphora after accessing the catalogue of the nursery I thought I bought it from.....the leaves are described as exuding a balsamic scent when rubbed and this is certainly true.....so perhaps the mystery has been solved. He will try to verify this if the nursery is at a plant fair he intends to visit shortly......Many thanks to all those who contributed.
« Last Edit: September 27, 2018, 07:52:19 AM by Alisdair »
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.