Nigella ciliaris

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John J

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Nigella ciliaris
« on: April 15, 2018, 07:29:48 PM »
An exciting find this morning by my wife. She saw this flower that had suddenly appeared, apparently out of nowhere, until she remembered sowing some seeds in the general area 2 years before. They were supposedly seeds of a nigella that was rare in Cyprus. The Red Data Book quickly identified it as Nigella ciliaris. This nigella has not been recorded in the wild in Cyprus since 1862 in one location and 1889 and 1912 in a second. It was recorded in a private garden collection in 1987. It does occur in Syria and Israel.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

Umbrian

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Re: Nigella ciliaris
« Reply #1 on: April 16, 2018, 06:37:55 AM »
That is a wonderful photograph of a fabulous flower - well done John and Charithea.
Good to know that a passion for plants and gardening can help save plants that are rare and obviously threatened in former habitats.
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.

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Alisdair

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Re: Nigella ciliaris
« Reply #2 on: April 24, 2018, 11:57:28 AM »
Wow!!
Alisdair Aird
Gardens in SE England (Sussex); also coastal Southern Greece, and (in a very small way) South West France; MGS member (and former president); vice chairman RHS Lily Group, past chairman Cyclamen Society

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John J

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Re: Nigella ciliaris
« Reply #3 on: April 16, 2019, 06:28:59 AM »
I'm pleased to report that the Nigella ciliaris has reappeared this year, in time for friends from Greece who were staying with us for a few days to see it. This time we'll attempt to harvest any seeds in order to try it in other areas and increase the numbers.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

Umbrian

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Re: Nigella ciliaris
« Reply #4 on: April 17, 2019, 06:39:17 AM »
Shame it doesn't seed itself about as prolifically as other Nigella - much as I love them I do find myself having to pull them out by the handful in some areas where they threaten to swamp other plants.. however if it did that I suppose we would not appreciate it as much ?
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.

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John J

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Re: Nigella ciliaris
« Reply #5 on: April 17, 2019, 08:40:28 AM »
Carole, thank you for your comments re nigella! I have a yearly battle with my other half when it comes to removing them from places that I consider them to be unwelcome. When she returns later from visiting her sister I will show her your posting to re-enforce my argument!
We will try to gather seed from the N. ciliaris this year and if we are successful maybe have enough to send you some.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

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Charithea

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Re: Nigella ciliaris
« Reply #6 on: April 17, 2019, 10:51:28 AM »
I love Nigellas especially the double petalled in white or blue.  I don't know  why John complains. I pulled out a lot of Nigellas yesterday evening because I spotted some seedlings of Flomis purpurea. I had put the seeds down last November and the Nigellas protected them from the heavy rain.  They have other uses besides being pretty.
I garden in Cyprus, in a flat old farming field, alt. approx. 30 m asl.

Umbrian

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Re: Nigella ciliaris
« Reply #7 on: April 18, 2019, 06:55:48 AM »
Oh dear! Didn't want to add fuel to the fire regarding the question of the propensity of Nigella to self seed! I love it but find in my 'new garden' , where the soil is wonderfully friable, that it can be so successful it chokes out anything that stands in its way.
On a happier note I e.mailed David D the other day thanking him for a wonderful Salvia indica that he gave me as a small plant last September and that is now in flower. He replied that the seed had come from Charithea which fact made me doubly happy. :)  :)
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.

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Charithea

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Re: Nigella ciliaris
« Reply #8 on: April 18, 2019, 10:26:51 AM »
Don't worry Carole you have not caused any problems.  True this year with the wonderful rain the Nigella has SPRED. Salvia indicahas such beautiful flowers.  My main one has already flowered and it is seeding but I have more growing at different stages.  The other great thing about them it is that they regrow in the autumn after their summer rest .
I garden in Cyprus, in a flat old farming field, alt. approx. 30 m asl.