Australian Bottle Brush Tree

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Hilary

  • Hero Member
Australian Bottle Brush Tree
« on: November 12, 2017, 11:44:41 AM »
There is a narrow strip of earth in the yard of the block of flats where we live which no one bothers with.  I sometimes lop off bits of the trees or bushes which seem to have got out of hand. My husband brings a gardener with a chain saw to cut off the processional caterpillar nests and prune the Robinia at the end of the winter.
Twenty years ago, when most of these plants were chosen and planted by a committee  each member of which   seems to have chosen a couple of plants each. One wanted a Norfolk Pine , another Oleander, someone else wanted a Bay Tree. Some children came home from school one day with tiny trees which needed planting, hence the two Pine Trees. I have since had a Judas Tree planted and my downstairs neighbour planted an apricot stone which is now a good sized tree. The Acacia Farnesiana which I so wanted didn't survive a football match.
As you can imagine it is all over crowded now and a very suitable home for insects, cats  and birds. My problem is the Australian Bottle Brush Tree.
It is quite tall and in the summer produced some flowers on the top branches but all the lower branches are dried up without leaves or flowers. Would it produce new branches if I pruned it hard or should I just leave well alone ?
 
MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

JayB

  • Jr. Member
Re: Australian Bottle Brush Tree
« Reply #1 on: November 12, 2017, 12:14:07 PM »
As long as the dried up branches are not dead you can prune them hard as you like really, they are prolific back budders normally. Give it a good fee and drink and it should be OK.
G'day from an Aussie in Spain. Currently attempting a total garden overhaul.

*

JTh

  • Hero Member
Re: Australian Bottle Brush Tree
« Reply #2 on: November 12, 2017, 04:38:52 PM »
I suppose the most important point is to secure sufficient light; the bottle brush tree needs  at least six hours of sun a day to flower, so maybe you need to open up the space around it? I found some information about light, feeding and pruning here: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/shrubs/bottlebrush/bottlebrush-wont-bloom.htm
Veterinary surgeon by training with a phD in parasitology, worked as virologist since 1992.
Member of the MGS and Branch website editor. Gardening in Oslo and to a limited extent in Halkidiki, Greece.

Hilary

  • Hero Member
Re: Australian Bottle Brush Tree
« Reply #3 on: November 13, 2017, 07:33:07 AM »
Many thanks JayB and Jorun.
I will open up as much space as I can round the Australian Bottle Bush Tree and cut it back
MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care