Plastic water bottles for storing cuttings

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Joanna Savage

  • Sr. Member
Plastic water bottles for storing cuttings
« on: January 13, 2017, 11:52:54 AM »
Hi David, I wonder if you use the plastic water bottle trick for storing cuttings. I have travelled with some collectors who put their cuttings straight into an empty water bottle and then close it. It seems the plants can endure three or four weeks of such treatment. So many problems are solved with plastic water bottles and cardboard cartons when in the field.

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MikeHardman

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Plastic water bottles for storing cuttings
« Reply #1 on: January 26, 2017, 05:06:12 PM »
Joanna,
That's a good tip, thanks.
I guess one could put a drop of fungicide in the bottle as well.

Mike
Mike
Geologist by Uni training, IT consultant, Referee for Viola for Botanical Society of the British Isles, commissioned author and photographer on Viola for RHS (Enc. of Perennials, The Garden, The Plantsman).
I garden near Polis, Cyprus, 100m alt., on marl, but have gardened mainly in S.England

David Dickinson

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Plastic water bottles for storing cuttings
« Reply #2 on: January 27, 2017, 02:02:26 AM »
I seem to remember a suggestion some time ago (from John J?) that it might be a good idea to have a page entitled "useful tips" or something along those lines. Joanna's tip might be a good starting point. I have put one of those broader-necked cold tea "nestea" type bottles into my rucksack and will be carrying it with me at all times. One recycled from rubbish bin at work.

As for the cutting, it is sending out little side shoots but I can't see any roots as yet. When roots do appear I can spot them very quickly as I pot cuttings into transparent plastic beer glasses. And pot on seedlings too. Much cheaper than plastic flower pots and they allow for easy monitoring of root growth and pests such as fungus gnat larvae which are the bane of my life. There's tip no2 already :-)
I have a small garden in Rome, Italy. Some open soil, some concrete, some paved. Temperatures in winter occasionally down to 0C. Summer temperatures up to 40C in the shade. There are never watering restrictions but, of course, there is little natural water for much of June, July and August.

cerg

  • Newbie
Re: Plastic water bottles for storing cuttings
« Reply #3 on: February 24, 2017, 07:24:45 PM »
I used to do that, but it is not brilliant for cutting of Mediterranean species from drier areas (as I had to ralise all too well by losing some amazing cuttings from Crete because I trusted the wretched thing): if they are a bit wet when you put them in the bottle, they tend to rot much faster than their colleagues from northern or wetter climates.

Best regards

Corrado (& Rina)   

David Dickinson

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Re: Plastic water bottles for storing cuttings
« Reply #4 on: February 25, 2017, 12:48:33 AM »
Funny this should come up again for discussion today. I was in Milan yesterday and took a wide-necked plastic bottle with me, just in case. I came back with 6 cuttings, undamaged and ready to pop into vases this morning. Let's see what happens. Clearly after less than 24 hours in the bottle there was no sign of mould. But Corrado's comments are noted!
I have a small garden in Rome, Italy. Some open soil, some concrete, some paved. Temperatures in winter occasionally down to 0C. Summer temperatures up to 40C in the shade. There are never watering restrictions but, of course, there is little natural water for much of June, July and August.

cerg

  • Newbie
Re: Plastic water bottles for storing cuttings
« Reply #5 on: February 25, 2017, 01:03:38 PM »
Of course David! 24 hours is clearly not enough for mould to develop .... It depends also on the species. My comment specifically applies to cuttings from Mediterranean from drier areas and I have to add for times of 3 to 4 days.   

Best,

Corrado & Rina