Plants of the world on postage stamps

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Hilary

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Re: Plants of the world on postage stamps
« Reply #1185 on: January 27, 2021, 08:52:44 AM »
Ephippiorhynchus asiaticus, Black Necked Stork, Jabiru

Australia issued a four-stamp series in 1977 named BIRDS FROM WETLANDS

No mention of this bird in THE MEDITERRANEAN GARDEN but there is an interesting article written by
 Christina Lambert of her Australian experiences in THE MEDITERRANEAN GARDEN number 92 April, 2018

A VISIT TO SOUTHERN AUSTRALIA: PART 1 ADELAIDE
MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

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Charithea

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Re: Plants of the world on postage stamps
« Reply #1186 on: January 27, 2021, 02:26:38 PM »
Hilary, yesterday afternoon I had responded to your post regarding 'Trifolium repens or clover  but after I did the spell check the text disappeared. I had the same problem a few times. I obviously must have touched something that cancelled it. A few years ago we went to Sardinia with the MGS group and I noticed 'clover' with very large leaves and large burgundy colour flowers. It also had a lovely aroma. I bought back flower heads in an envelope and promptly misplaced them but last year I accidentally found the seeds in an Italian novel I was re -reading and put them in the ground. The clover had the large leaves and large flowers but they were an insipid pink colour. It self seeded and we have the clover growing again. Dare I hope that it will be burgundy in colour?
« Last Edit: January 27, 2021, 04:43:14 PM by Charithea »
I garden in Cyprus, in a flat old farming field, alt. approx. 30 m asl.

Hilary

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Re: Plants of the world on postage stamps
« Reply #1187 on: January 27, 2021, 03:54:39 PM »
I hope you have success with your clover this year.

 Isn't it amazing how things hide themselves around the house?
This year I discovered some calendars  my daughter had given me a few years ago
They turned up a couple of weeks ago  in a cupboard which gets a regular turn out at least once a year
MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

David Dickinson

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Re: Plants of the world on postage stamps
« Reply #1188 on: January 28, 2021, 01:10:36 AM »
Was it Trifolium incarnatum Charithea? https://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/2230/ I can easily get you seeds as it grows in many places just outside Rome.
I have a small garden in Rome, Italy. Some open soil, some concrete, some paved. Temperatures in winter occasionally down to 0°C. Summer temperatures up to 40°C in the shade. There are never watering restrictions but, of course, there is little natural water for much of June, July and August.

Hilary

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Re: Plants of the world on postage stamps
« Reply #1189 on: January 28, 2021, 09:34:01 AM »
Adenium boehmianum a synonym for Adenium obesum subsp .boehmianum

BUSHMAN POISON
Namibia issued a series of nine stamps named FLORA AND FAUNA in1997
Apparently a very poisonous plant which grows in Namibia and South Angola

This strange plant, or a close relative, is mentioned in
GARDENING ON THE EDGE by Trevor Nottle
THE MEDITERRANEAN GARDEN number 18 Autumn 1999
MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

*

Charithea

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Re: Plants of the world on postage stamps
« Reply #1190 on: January 28, 2021, 07:30:06 PM »
David thank you again for being so helpful.  I am not sure if it was Trifolium incarnatum  though the colour seems to be the same but there is also another clover that grows in Sardinia called Trifolium angustifolium but it says it is pink. I do remember that I was taken aback by the strong colour of the plant when I first saw it when we landed in Cagliari airport.  We saw it later in fields and the guide must have told us its name but I have forgotten it. The flower heads containing the seeds were saved in tissue paper and then in an envelope which was used as a book marker then.  I would love some of the seeds of the Trifolium incarnatum. I am posting a photo of the clover that is growing in our garden.
I garden in Cyprus, in a flat old farming field, alt. approx. 30 m asl.

Hilary

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Re: Plants of the world on postage stamps
« Reply #1191 on: January 29, 2021, 08:26:59 AM »
Picea pungens, Blue spruce

Romania issued a six-stamp series in 1996 Named CONIFERS

Nicholas Stavroulakis mentions Picea in
THE FLORA OF OTTOMAN GARDENS
I, TREES
THE MEDITERRANEAN GARDEN number 10, Autumn 1997

MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

David Dickinson

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Re: Plants of the world on postage stamps
« Reply #1192 on: January 30, 2021, 01:29:29 AM »
Hi Charithea,

I will keep my eyes peeled around May and June to seed when the seeds have ripened and get some to you.
I have a small garden in Rome, Italy. Some open soil, some concrete, some paved. Temperatures in winter occasionally down to 0°C. Summer temperatures up to 40°C in the shade. There are never watering restrictions but, of course, there is little natural water for much of June, July and August.

Hilary

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Re: Plants of the world on postage stamps
« Reply #1193 on: January 31, 2021, 08:55:49 AM »
 WINTER

The winter stamp from the four-stamp series issued by Germany in 2006.

We don’t often get snow in Corinth but 2017 seems to have been a bumper year.
The first photo is of our beach, The Kalamia, in January 2017
The second photo of Ancient Corinth a few days earlier in January  2017
 and the last photo of vineyards on the way to Stymphalia in December 2017

Snow is mentioned in THE MEDITERRANEAN GARDEN number 1, Summer 1995 in
 PLANTS THAT STAND ON THEIR HEADS; by Joanna Millar

This article can be read on the free download of the journal
https://www.mediterraneangardensociety.org/journal1.pdf
MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

*

Charithea

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Re: Plants of the world on postage stamps
« Reply #1194 on: January 31, 2021, 06:33:08 PM »
The photographs look beautiful Hilary.  That is the way I like my snow.  On photographs!
I garden in Cyprus, in a flat old farming field, alt. approx. 30 m asl.

Hilary

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Re: Plants of the world on postage stamps
« Reply #1195 on: January 31, 2021, 06:37:04 PM »
I must say my husband took the photo at the beach
I am not too keen on snow either
MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

Hilary

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Re: Plants of the world on postage stamps
« Reply #1196 on: February 01, 2021, 09:23:29 AM »
Erysimum transsylvanicum SCHUR.

A stamp issued by Romania in 1967 in a six-stamp series named MOUNTAIN FLORA

Erysimum seems to be a Wallflower which grows in Romania.

There is no mention of this plant in THE MEDITERRANEAN GARDEN but there are quite a few references to Wallflowers. In the end I chose
THE ‘OCCASIONAL GARDENER’ IN A MEDITERRANEAN SETTING
by Andrew Polmear
Journal number 62 October 2010
MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

Hilary

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Re: Plants of the world on postage stamps
« Reply #1197 on: February 02, 2021, 08:28:50 AM »
Aquilegia transsylvanica SCHUR.

A stamp issued by Romania in 1967 in a series of 6 stamps named MOUNTAIN FLORA

John Rendall writes that he saw “ a wonderful light blue aquilegia in full flower” on Mount Olympus, Greece.

 NATIVES AND CULTIVARS,
THE MEDITERRANEAN GARDEN number 65, July 2011,

There are some photographs which illustrate this article if you follow this link

http://www.mediterraneangardensocietyarchive.org/65-natives.html
MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

*

Charithea

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Re: Plants of the world on postage stamps
« Reply #1198 on: February 02, 2021, 11:51:25 AM »
Thank you Hilary for posting this. Last year in early Spring we visited the Government plant centre on the foothills of Mount Troodos and I persuaded John to buy one plant again. Our experiences  have been for them to flower for a short period and then die but this one has made the effort worth while. It flowered well and it is still alive and very healthy. I collected all the seeds and re sown them. I don't know its full botanical name. The man at the centre was not sure. Any how I am happy calling it Aqueligia until the full name is found.
« Last Edit: February 03, 2021, 08:17:45 AM by Charithea »
I garden in Cyprus, in a flat old farming field, alt. approx. 30 m asl.

Hilary

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Re: Plants of the world on postage stamps
« Reply #1199 on: February 02, 2021, 01:46:33 PM »
I too have an Aquilegia plant. I grew it from seed which I had obtained from the MGS seed exchange and  sowed in the autumn of 2019.

I think only one seed germinated  and I watched the plant produce one stalk at a time all summer of 2020. Now it is sitting in the sun on the front balcony and looking very healthy, maybe I should move it into a shadier spot.

The seeds I got in 2020 and sowed in the autumn of 2020 have not yet decided to germinate 

All very exciting
MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care