Plants of the world on postage stamps

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Hilary

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Re: Plants of the world on postage stamps
« Reply #585 on: July 06, 2018, 05:21:20 AM »
Saccharum officinarum, Sugar Cane

A stamp issued by Brasil in 1977 in a series named OCCUPATIONS

Here a cane cutter is shown at work.

The Photo is of sugar cane on a boat on the Nile being taken to be processed

Saccharum officinarum is in a list of plants vulnerable to the two pests attacking the palm trees in THE MEDITERRANEAN GARDEN issue 68 April 2012.
THE PALM PEST III. GREECE: AN INTERVIEW
By Cali Doxiadis
MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

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John J

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Re: Plants of the world on postage stamps
« Reply #586 on: July 06, 2018, 06:59:42 AM »
Sugar cane was grown extensively in Cyprus during the Medieval period. The photo is of a 14th C sugar mill and factory in our village, Kolossi. It's next to the 15th C Castle that was built by the Knights of the Order of St John of Jerusalem (Knights Hospitaller).
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

Hilary

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Re: Plants of the world on postage stamps
« Reply #587 on: July 06, 2018, 08:47:37 AM »
Why did the building need such huge buttresses?
MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

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John J

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Re: Plants of the world on postage stamps
« Reply #588 on: July 06, 2018, 09:10:22 AM »
I don't really know, Hilary, Cyprus is prone to earthquakes but whether they would be effective against something like that I have no idea.
The building was a factory where the sugar cane was rendered down after being crushed in the adjacent mill. Inside the building there were large fire chambers on which copper cauldrons were placed to boil the cane juice. The wood was fed in from outside, you can't see the openings as they are below the level of the boundary wall. Maybe the buttresses were needed to reinforce the wall due to the heat generated. Again I don't know.
The syrup was initially black and became whiter the more often it was boiled. Cyprus produced 3 types of sugar - pulvere di zucchero - a pure refined sugar powder (boiled 3 times); zamburo - less refined (boiled twice) and molassa - a syrupy mass (boiled once). Cyprus sugar was considered to be much the best quality produced in the Mediterranean Basin. However, production declined in the 16th C as the opening up of the Americas provided an easier and cheaper product.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

Hilary

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Re: Plants of the world on postage stamps
« Reply #589 on: July 07, 2018, 05:08:06 AM »
Narcissus

A stamp issued by the Royal Mail in 1979 in a four stamp series named BRITISH WILD FLOWERS

The photo is of the Villanueva building in THE ROYAL BOTANIC GARDEN, MADRID
There is a pool in front of the building surrounded by some grass.
As is usual, in spring, the grass is dotted with Narcissus.
In the middle of the pool there is a bust of LINNEUS
 You can also see the Canary Island Palm wrapped up, like a bride, to ward of the destructive insects. I see from older photos there used to be three Palm trees in front of the building

Today I am pointing you to THE MEDITERRANEAN GARDEN number 15, Winter 1998/9 to read about autumn Narcissus
IN SEARCH OF AUTUMN DAFFODILS IN SPAIN
 by Derrick Donnison- Morgan
MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

Hilary

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Re: Plants of the world on postage stamps
« Reply #590 on: July 08, 2018, 05:31:50 AM »
Lilium regale

A postage stamp issued by Poland in 1964 in a series named
GARDEN FLOWERS

I don’t know the difference between Lilium regale and Lilium candida so I will pretend they are the same

To read about Madonna Lilies, Lilium candidum, in THE MEDITERRANEAN GARDEN go to issue number 62, October 2010 and read
THE ‘OCCASIONAL GARDENER’ IN A MEDITERRANEAN SETTING
 by Andrew Polmear
You will also find a drawing by Megan Bozkurt depicting a lilium candidumin issue number 81
MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

*

Alisdair

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Re: Plants of the world on postage stamps - Lilium regale
« Reply #591 on: July 08, 2018, 07:56:46 AM »
Here's Lilium regale Hilary; one of the strongest lily species in temperate gardens, and beautifully fragrant - but it would need too much watering into summer (this is its flowering time) for most mediterranean gardens
Alisdair Aird
Gardens in SE England (Sussex); also coastal Southern Greece, and (in a very small way) South West France; MGS member (and former president); vice chairman RHS Lily Group, past chairman Cyclamen Society

Hilary

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Re: Plants of the world on postage stamps
« Reply #592 on: July 08, 2018, 08:36:14 AM »
They look strong
MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

Hilary

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Re: Plants of the world on postage stamps
« Reply #593 on: July 11, 2018, 06:03:26 AM »
Alcedo atthis, Kingfisher

This stamp was issued by the Royal Mail in a 4 stamp series to celebrate
THE 100TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE PROTECTION OF BIRDS.
Of this series I only have this one stamp which was kindly given to me by my friend L.

When we took the boat trip down the River Evros we caught flashes of this bird but it was too quick to take a snap. We did see a damaged Kingfisher in a cage at the bird hospital on Aegina but no photo.
However, I did find a list of animals and flowers depicted on the wrought iron gates of the Globe Theater which includes a Kingfisher
The reference to Kingfishers is from King Lear act ii scene ii
Quote
“That in the natures of their lords rebel;
Bring oil to fire, snow to their colder moods;
Renege, affirm, and turn their halcyon beaks
With every gale and vary of their masters,
Knowing nought, like dogs, but following.
A plague upon your epileptic visage!
Smoile you my speeches, as I were a Fool?”

It was believed that the Halcyon, Kingfisher if hung by the tail or beak would turn with the wind.
Now that is something I didn’t know.

Cali Doxiadis writes about the Kingfisher in her letter ‘From the President: HALCYON DAYS ‘,
 THE MEDITERRANEAN GARDEN number 48, April 2007.
There is also a drawing by Derek Toms
The kingfisher, Alcedo atthis – its floating nest is mythical
MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

Hilary

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Re: Plants of the world on postage stamps
« Reply #594 on: July 12, 2018, 05:09:57 AM »
Jacaranda mimosifolia

A stamp issued in 1970 by Bermuda.
There are 13 stamps in the series, I have two of them but the others look very tempting “get thee behind me” etc.

There used to be 17 Jacaranda trees down the main road of Corinth which were ripped out to plant Canary Island Palms. I am still mourning the disappearance of the original Jacaranda trees. I had counted 17 trees and one day went armed with my camera, the kind you had to load with film,   to take photos starting at the sea end of the town
Can you imagine the shock I had to see the first three or four trees cut down? I quickly dashed up the road to take photos of the remaining trees. Apparently at one time a man climbed one of the trees and wouldn’t come down as he didn’t want it to be cut. However, the Canary Island Palm enthusiasts got their way. I should go and count how many of those Palm Trees were planted and how many have survived; I must admit there were some tall palm trees already in the central division.

 This year I did notice a Jacaranda in the Park/ Square/ta Perivolakia’ probably grown from seed of the old mourned trees but I omitted to take its photo.
Hope I haven’t bored you with this story other times. I found the photos I took then and the one which I have named ‘near the Park is probably the parent of the Jacaranda I saw this spring


However many people who contribute articles to THE MEDITERRANEAN GARDEN grow  Jacaranda trees in their gardens or have seen them in gardens they have visited.
Go to THE MEDITERRANEAN GARDEN number 43 and read
A TALE OF TWO GARDENS by John Bradshaw
MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

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Alisdair

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Re: Plants of the world on postage stamps
« Reply #595 on: July 12, 2018, 09:03:28 AM »
What a shame they've gone, Hilary!
Alisdair Aird
Gardens in SE England (Sussex); also coastal Southern Greece, and (in a very small way) South West France; MGS member (and former president); vice chairman RHS Lily Group, past chairman Cyclamen Society

Hilary

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Re: Plants of the world on postage stamps
« Reply #596 on: July 13, 2018, 05:01:42 AM »
Tobacco, Tabaco, common name for Nicotiana tabacum

This stamp was issued in 1959-62 by Rhodesia & Nyasaland

When we visited THE ROYAL BOTANIC GARDEN, MADRID in the spring there was a section with vegetables and commercial products. There were none of the bright green fresh Tobacco plants but there were a few stalks with seed heads

There is a street named after
Quote
“the people who make or produce cigars or cigatettes”
in Madrid quite near the old tobacco factory.  We went looking for the street hoping that the street sign would be of painted tiles but unfortunately the street was in a newer part of the city and the name plate was of the new type

Tobacco is mentioned in the article written by Trevor Nottle
 SOUTH AUSTRALIA- A MEDITERRANEAN EXPERIENCE
Which appears in THE MEDITERRANEAN GARDEN number 72, April 2013

MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

Hilary

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Re: Plants of the world on postage stamps
« Reply #597 on: July 14, 2018, 05:00:07 AM »
Freesia
,
This stamp was issued by Jersey, one of the Channel Islands, in 1974
The series is named SPRING FLOWERS

If I had known that such a stamp existed I would have photographed the freesias, from our balcony, against a blue background.
Our freesias are very successful although I do add a few bulbs every year

To read about Freesias and many other plants growing in a garden on Lesvos go to THE MEDITERRANEAN GARDEN number 49, July 2007
A MAGICAL GARDEN IN MITHIMNA, LESBOS by Carol P. Christ
MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

Hilary

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Re: Plants of the world on postage stamps
« Reply #598 on: July 15, 2018, 05:05:00 AM »
Delphinium grandiflorum , Siberian larkspur

Another stamp issued by Mongolia in 1960
To read how to grow this flower go here
http://www.missouribotanicalgarden.org/PlantFinder/PlantFinderDetails.aspx?taxonid=286134&isprofile=0&

Nicholas Stavroulakis  includes the Delphinium as being present in DESIGNING AN OTTOMAN GARDEN in
 THE MEDITERRANEAN GARDEN  number 9, Summer 1997
MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

Hilary

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Re: Plants of the world on postage stamps
« Reply #599 on: July 16, 2018, 05:20:03 AM »
Tulipa gesneriana

This stamp was issued by Turkey in 1960 in a four stamp series named
SPRING FLOWER FESTIVAL

When we were in Madrid this spring there was an exhibition of tulips at
THE ROYAL BOTANIC GARDEN, MADRID
One of the beds was filled with deep purple tulips named ‘Blue Amiable’

As you can imagine there are many references to tulips in
THE MEDITERRANEAN GARDEN
I chose
DESIGNING AN OTTOMAN GARDEN by Nicholas Stavroulakis, I thought this article was fitting since the stamp is from Turkey
THE MEDITERRANEAN GARDEN number 9, Summer 1997

MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care