Plants of the world on postage stamps

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Hilary

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Re: Plants of the world on postage stamps
« Reply #30 on: November 20, 2016, 07:26:29 AM »
Pyrus communis
Bartlett Pear, Poirier 'Bartlett' depicted on a stamp from Canada, issued in 1992.

Pyrus communis is mentioned in THE MEDITERRANEAN GARDEN,
Number 70, October 2012, page 25.
A CONVERSATION IN THE MOORISH GARDEN OF CREVILLENTE
By Pedro Moya
MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

Hilary

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Re: Plants of the world on postage stamps
« Reply #31 on: November 21, 2016, 01:36:34 PM »
Prunus armeniaca
A stamp issued by Canada in 1994 depicting a Westcot Apricot tree, Abricotier 'Westcot'

Several prunus trees are mentioned in THE MEDITERRANEAN GARDEN,
number 10, autumn 1997, page 14.

THE FLORA OF OTTOMAN GARDENS
1. TREES
By Nicholas Stavroulakis
MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

Hilary

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Re: Plants of the world on postage stamps
« Reply #32 on: November 22, 2016, 10:31:09 AM »
Prunus persica'Elberta'
Pecher 'Elberta'

This peach tree is depicted on a stamp from Canada, Issued in 1995.

Peach trees along with apricot trees and pear trees are all mentioned in the MEDITERRANEAN GARDEN
Number 10, Autumn 1997, page 14 and
Number 70, October 2012, page 25.
The titles and authors of the articles are in the two previous posts. 
MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

Hilary

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Re: Plants of the world on postage stamps
« Reply #33 on: November 24, 2016, 06:28:58 PM »
Rosa Mutabilis.
This stamp from the UK came out in 1991.
The flowers change in colour as they age.
It is mentioned many times in THE MEDITERRANEAN GARDEN, too many to be listed here.
MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

*

John J

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Re: Plants of the world on postage stamps
« Reply #34 on: November 25, 2016, 07:33:24 AM »
Hilary, our Rosa mutabilis taken this morning. Not looking its best but making an effort despite our ongoing drought conditions.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

Hilary

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Re: Plants of the world on postage stamps
« Reply #35 on: November 25, 2016, 01:44:12 PM »
Glad someone had a photo of this rose.
Most of my rose photos are named by colour only
MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

Hilary

  • Hero Member
Re: Plants of the world on postage stamps
« Reply #36 on: November 26, 2016, 09:04:27 AM »
Rosa'Mme Alfred Carriere'
Mentioned so many times in THE MEDITERRANEAN GARDEN it would take ages to list them here.
The series was issued in 1991 and I see from the information about each rose that this climbing rose
 'will even  do well on a north- facing wall'
I hope someone has a photo of this rose  which they can post.
MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

Hilary

  • Hero Member
Re: Plants of the world on postage stamps
« Reply #37 on: November 27, 2016, 08:15:57 AM »
Rosa moyesii
Another stamp issued by the UK in 1991.

The plant was found "in the mountains of western Sichuan on the border between China and Tibet"

This rose is mentioned in THE MEDITERRANEAN GARDEN, number 42, October 2005, on page 43.

Read the article THE WARS OF THE ROSES-AN AUSTRALIAN PERSPECTIVE by Trevor Nottle.
MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

Hilary

  • Hero Member
Re: Plants of the world on postage stamps
« Reply #38 on: December 04, 2016, 08:58:04 AM »
Cupressus sempervirens      Cypress tree
I was surprised and disappointed to find that I didn't have a single flower stamp from Cyprus.
Instead I found this stamp depicting the castle at Kolossi  with, what looks like, Cypress trees next to it.
This  stamp was in use between 1938 and 1951

The photo is of Cypress trees near Xylokeriza, Corinthia.

Cypress trees are mentioned many times in THE MEDITERRANEAN GARDEN
MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

*

John J

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Re: Plants of the world on postage stamps
« Reply #39 on: December 04, 2016, 05:26:11 PM »
Interesting, Hilary. Kolossi is our village, we live a 5 minute walk away from the Castle. The 3 Cypress trees on the stamp are probably artistic license, not sure they ever existed. While the one that does exist and is over a hundred years old, so would have been there when the stamp was issued, has been omitted. It should feature in the space between the Castle and the King. (The other explanation is that the sketch used was made before 1900 of course). It was planted around 1900, along with the Tipuana tipu that is a short distance away from it, by a man named Cecil Duncan Hay. His photo is below.
Unfortunately I don't have any recent full on photos of the tree but below is one taken a few years ago showing it appearing above the Medieval Sugar Factory next to the Castle.
The black and white photo was probably taken sometime in the 1920s and shows the tree to the right with the Tipuana tipu behind it. The fa├žade that is showing is the same one that appears on your stamp. At the top you can see what I believe is called a machicolation for pouring hot liquids onto unwanted guests, same as on your stamp.
I'm sure that there have been Cyprus stamps that feature flowers. Are you still actively collecting? If so would you like me to check at the PO to see if any are available?
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

Hilary

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Re: Plants of the world on postage stamps
« Reply #40 on: December 05, 2016, 06:43:37 AM »
Interesting.
I thought castles were either on hill tops, on a river crossing or at a port. Why was Kolossi castle built where it is?
Medieval sugar factory. What were they growing to make sugar in Medieval times?
Another stamp featuring sugar cane is coming up in a few days time.
No I am not actively collecting stamps now, just enjoying the ones I already have and keeping the ones  which, rarely, arrive on an envelope
MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

Hilary

  • Hero Member
Re: Plants of the world on postage stamps
« Reply #41 on: December 05, 2016, 07:24:53 AM »
Tilia cordata
This stamp, showing the leaves and closed buds of the Linden tree, was issued in 1939.
The country was then named BOHEMIA AND MORAVIA  later to become CZECHOSLOVAKIA

The photo  was taken of a Linden tree growing in a park in Bilbao, Spain.

Although this tree does not seem to be mentioned in THE MEDITERRANEAN GARDEN it is mentioned several times in the website of the MGS
MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

*

John J

  • Hero Member
Re: Plants of the world on postage stamps
« Reply #42 on: December 05, 2016, 09:57:32 AM »
Hilary, to fully answer your question I would have to go back to Richard the Lionheart and the Third Crusade, but that's a long story. At the risk of incurring the wrath of the Moderators by embarking on a History lesson on the Plant Forum.  ;)
Suffice it to say that calling the present building a castle is generous in the extreme, it's a fortified keep. It was built in 1454 and stands on the site of an earlier castle, possibly erected around 1210. In that year the Lusignon King of Cyprus, Hugh I, had given a vast tract of land, stretching from Paphos to Limassol and up into the foothills of the Troodos Range, to the Order of St John of Jerusalem (Knights Hospitallers). Following the fall of Acre in 1291 they were forced to move to Cyprus and in 1302 established their HQ in Kolossi. It officially became the site of their military administration, called Commandary, in 1380. What happened to the original castle is uncertain but the present one was erected in 1454 by the then Grand Commander, Louis de Magnac. The Grand Master of the Order had moved to the island of Rhodes in 1310, where his magnificent palace can be seen today.
As regards the sugar, it is believed that sugar cane was brought to the Middle East from Asia by Arab traders in the 10thC. It came to the attention of northern Europe via the Crusaders. Until then honey had been the main source of sweetener in that part of the world. When the Hospitallers moved to Cyprus they brought sugar cane with them and grew it in large areas of their vast land holdings. The sugar mill and associated factory date from the 14thC. The mill was powered by water brought from the nearby Kouris river. Three types of sugar were produced and depended on how many times the product was boiled; pulvere di zucchero - pure, refined sugar powder; zamburo - less refined and molassa - a syrupy mass. However, due to a variety of factors sugar production declined in the 16thC.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

Hilary

  • Hero Member
Re: Plants of the world on postage stamps
« Reply #43 on: December 05, 2016, 12:35:12 PM »
Talking about sugar cane this 1938 stamp from Fiji appears to depict sugar cane, Saccharum officinarum
The series was called ' Local Motifs'
MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

Hilary

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Re: Plants of the world on postage stamps
« Reply #44 on: December 08, 2016, 08:54:25 AM »
This stamp issued by Finland in 1997 depicts Prunus padus, Bird Cherry, Hackberry, Hagberry, Mayday tree.
I did say I would only post photos of stamps showing plants  mentioned in THE MEDITERRANEAN GARDEN and this tree is mentioned in the journal number 49, July 2007 on pages 53 and 54.
Sitting down to re read the article REPLACING TREES AFTER A FOREST FIRE By Peter Eaton I discovered that Prunus padus is in two lists of trees and their characteristics but there is no information about this tree, I wonder why?
MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care