Shades of blue

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Charithea

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Shades of blue
« on: June 12, 2016, 03:05:47 PM »
This colour  seems to dominate in our garden this time of the year. I decided to share with you some of the photos I took early in the morning.
« Last Edit: June 12, 2016, 05:42:51 PM by Charithea »
I garden in Cyprus, in a flat old farming field, alt. approx. 30 m asl.

Hilary

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Re: Shades of blue
« Reply #1 on: June 15, 2016, 05:27:07 PM »
Beautiful.
My vote goes to the Buddleja and the Ipomoeas
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Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

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Fleur Pavlidis

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Re: Shades of blue
« Reply #2 on: June 17, 2016, 08:10:18 AM »
Snap. This is one of my favourite buddlejas, though it doesn't smell as sweet to me (or the butterflies) as the other colours.
MGS member, Greece. I garden in Attica, Greece and Mt Goulinas (450m) Central Greece

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Charithea

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Re: Shades of blue
« Reply #3 on: June 17, 2016, 01:56:28 PM »
Hilary, you are right to favour the Ipomoeas and the Buddleja as they have lovely colour and do not fade in the intense sunshine. I now feel confident in growing IpomoeasThe Star of Yalta prefers some shade in the summer but it has been flowering since December. The Heavenly Blue is a tough one though. It stays open even in the hottest part of the day. The Buddleja is another story. It took us a few years to get them established. The white variety is growing tall and strong but the Black Knight is not as grand as Fleur's. My favourite though is the Cornflower. This is the first time I managed to grow it. I fell in love with it when we saw lots of them in Northen Greece. I plan to grow more this autumn at the edge of the field.
« Last Edit: June 17, 2016, 01:58:54 PM by Charithea »
I garden in Cyprus, in a flat old farming field, alt. approx. 30 m asl.

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Charithea

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Celebrating minor successes
« Reply #4 on: June 24, 2020, 02:24:33 PM »
I was no sure where this posting should be so I chose this heading. I have lamented many times about the many failures to grow certain plants that other people succeed easily but this time I am rejoicing in these minor triumphs.  My photos taken on the Ipad are not that great but the general outlines are there. Salvia yangii has survived the winter and although a poor specimen has flowered.  The other plant is Gaura lindheimerii. I would normally buy Several ones in early spring and try them out in different parts of the garden but they would flower and died so quickly that was not worth the money and energy used. About two years ago I dug up seedlings that appeared in early spring and replanted them in various locations.  This year they are growing around the field in places they chose.
« Last Edit: June 25, 2020, 06:20:05 AM by Charithea »
I garden in Cyprus, in a flat old farming field, alt. approx. 30 m asl.

David Dickinson

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Re: Shades of blue
« Reply #5 on: June 24, 2020, 11:10:35 PM »
I have a few buddlejas in my very small garden but, I have to say, the butterflies are not particularly attracted to them. They much prefer smaller-flowered salvias and verbenas. I presume the one you photographed  earlier in the thread is
'Black Knight'? I took a cutting from my sister's last autumn and it struck. Although only one stem of about a foot long, it sent out a flower head which I let grow and die off. Time to plant it out, I thought and decided which tub it was going in. I then promptly snapped it! The air was as blue as the flower but every cloud has a silver lining. It has sent out 2 or 3 new shoots from the base.
I have a small garden in Rome, Italy. Some open soil, some concrete, some paved. Temperatures in winter occasionally down to 0C. Summer temperatures up to 40C in the shade. There are never watering restrictions but, of course, there is little natural water for much of June, July and August.

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John J

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Re: Shades of blue
« Reply #6 on: June 25, 2020, 04:54:09 AM »
David, the photo of 'Black Knight' was taken 4 years ago but since then we've lost it. We now have 3 different colours but if they have names I've no idea what they are. The butterflies we get here don't seem to be too impressed by them either and, as you say, prefer the smaller flowered plants.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

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Charithea

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Re: Shades of blue
« Reply #7 on: June 25, 2020, 10:18:36 AM »
Here are what I consider a few more examples of minor successes.   Managing to keep alive the Clerodendrum bungei is one of them.  it flowered for the first 2 years of its life and then became smaller and sad looking until it almost disappeared. I used to give it a cup of water in the summer evening to keep it alive. This year it has increased in size and has beautiful shining leaves with a promise to flower. It was last year's copious rain that brought about the miracle.So gardeners don't give up.  Salvia splendens 'Martinus Burg' has exceeded my expectations.  The cuttings have became small bushes in the garden BUT I keep one in the pot as a 'safety net'. Love n Wishes are also growing happily in the ground surrounded by sticks to keep the cats away and a lovely airy Salvia greggii 'Royal Bumble' a cutting of a cutting from David D. Thank you.
« Last Edit: June 25, 2020, 10:41:23 AM by Charithea »
I garden in Cyprus, in a flat old farming field, alt. approx. 30 m asl.

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Charithea

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Re: Shades of blue
« Reply #8 on: June 28, 2020, 04:39:46 PM »
Once more I am posting a Salvia.   In fact a Salvia which prefers cooler climates but my gardening neighbour and fellow Salvia lover has worked with me to keep our cuttings alive.  She kept the cuttings of the Salvia amistad in a' cooler area' in her garden and safe from cats,  then when they were ready she gave me back some.  She accidentally broke one of the cuttings but put it in another pot and gave me that too.   I planted two in pots and saved the others for a friend.  One has started to flower  and the smaller cutting is also getting ready to do the same.   
« Last Edit: June 28, 2020, 04:43:48 PM by Charithea »
I garden in Cyprus, in a flat old farming field, alt. approx. 30 m asl.

Umbrian

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Re: Shades of blue
« Reply #9 on: June 30, 2020, 07:14:15 AM »
Well done Charithea, what a beautiful colour....I am still waiting..... David gave me that one but so far it does not look very happy  and no sign of flowers🙁
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.

David Dickinson

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Re: Shades of blue
« Reply #10 on: June 30, 2020, 09:50:32 AM »
I find Amistad needs more water than most of my other salvias. Doesn't seem to mind the heat nor full sun at midday but I have to water mine, which is in a large tub, every second day.
I have a small garden in Rome, Italy. Some open soil, some concrete, some paved. Temperatures in winter occasionally down to 0C. Summer temperatures up to 40C in the shade. There are never watering restrictions but, of course, there is little natural water for much of June, July and August.

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Charithea

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Re: Shades of blue
« Reply #11 on: June 30, 2020, 12:46:50 PM »
I am forced to water my Armistad every day David. My measure seems to be One coffee cup of water every day. I fell in love with its colour  Carole a few years ago when they first appeared in the market. We were visiting England and we came across it in a Nursery in Derbyshire.  I knew  that I would be advised against it so I bought it a gave it as a gift to John's sister. I brought a cutting back  with me and was doing OK until the snails ate it.  I got the mother of these cuttings from Ioannis Gryllis March 2019. So far so good.
I garden in Cyprus, in a flat old farming field, alt. approx. 30 m asl.

David Dickinson

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Re: Shades of blue
« Reply #12 on: July 01, 2020, 01:50:22 AM »
I presume that's one American coffee cup a day, Charithea?  One Italian coffe cup wouldn't go very far. Little bigger than a thimble! :-) Just wait till it gets bigger. Not really a "water-wise" plant but lovely to have in the garden.
I have a small garden in Rome, Italy. Some open soil, some concrete, some paved. Temperatures in winter occasionally down to 0C. Summer temperatures up to 40C in the shade. There are never watering restrictions but, of course, there is little natural water for much of June, July and August.

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Charithea

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Re: Shades of blue
« Reply #13 on: July 01, 2020, 01:10:10 PM »
No David, you presumed wrong. I use a UK cup. After all I am being loyal to my husband's place of birth. According to my kitchen measuring jug an American cup is a touch smaller then a U.K. Cup. I use a Cyprus  coffee cup which is equal to an Italian coffee cup to water my cactus once a week. I had complained to my friends that my cactus were not doing as well as theirs.  They enlighten me as to the why.  So far the cactus is thriving.
I garden in Cyprus, in a flat old farming field, alt. approx. 30 m asl.