A to Z of plants continuation

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John J

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A to Z of plants continuation
« on: March 30, 2016, 04:07:25 PM »
Our original thread would seem to have disappeared into the ether somehow. Attempts are being made to find and reinstate it but in the meantime I will continue on this additional thread. I am doing this mainly because I will be flying to Athens on Sunday and I had hoped to complete my list before I left. So, here goes from where I left off:-

Thymus x citriodorus
Also variety 'Variegata'.

Thymus vulgaris compactum

Trachelospermum jasminoides
Also the pale yellow flowered variety T. jasminoides'Star de Toscana'. Both took time to establish but are showing signs of really 'taking off' this year.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

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John J

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Re: A to Z of plants continuation
« Reply #1 on: March 30, 2016, 04:21:09 PM »
Tradescantia pallida 'Purpurea'
Sprawling ground cover.

Tradescantia sillamontana
Very drought tolerant, in fact takes all that the summer months can throw at it but suffers badly in the winter, more from the wet than the cold I suspect.

Tropaelum majus
Allowed to self-seed at will, especially in our 'orchard' area as they provide colour in the spring and can be cleared away as they die down in the summer.

Tulbaghia violaceae

No U, so on to V:-

Verbena bonariensis
Another self-seeder that is allowed to get away with it in certain areas.

Viburnum suspensum
Grown in partial shade and given regular water.

Viburnum tinus
One of the unsung heroes of Mediterranean gardens, an ever reliable standby that flowers each winter with little attention, or water.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

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John J

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Re: A to Z of plants continuation
« Reply #2 on: March 30, 2016, 04:29:21 PM »
Vitex agnus-castus
A plant that has many a story/myth attached to it. Ours might perform a bit better with a little more water than they currently get.

Vitex trifolia 'Purpurea'

Now for W:-

Wisteria sinensis
Doesn't seem to really appreciate the heat at this low altitude, or the rationed water. Produces flowers in spring but the foliage is nowhere near as lush as that on plants grown at higher elevations.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

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John J

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Re: A to Z of plants continuation
« Reply #3 on: March 30, 2016, 04:40:49 PM »
Almost forgot the one and only Z:-

Zantedeschia aethiopica
Several dotted around that return regularly each year.

That is my list completed. Obviously not a comprehensive list as I have undoubtedly accidentally overlooked some plants on my wanders around the property, notebook and pencil in hand. Also I have deliberately omitted some plants that are still only seedlings, or unproven cuttings that may or may not survive into adulthood. Hopefully it has given some insight into the range of plants that we are currently growing. It has certainly forced me to do something that I have been threatening for a long time, and that is to compile a card index system of those same plants. The next challenge is to attempt to keep said system up to date.  ;D
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

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John J

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Re: A to Z of plants continuation
« Reply #4 on: March 31, 2016, 11:22:46 AM »
In the previous post I forgot to mention that we also have a variety of pots of cactus and succulents that I omitted as they have not yet been positively identified.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

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John J

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Re: A to Z of plants continuation
« Reply #5 on: May 19, 2019, 08:18:43 AM »
I realise that it is 3 years since this subject was last addressed and I have been considering for some time that maybe I should make an attempt at producing a more comprehensive, illustrated version, ie with a photo/photos of all the plants mentioned. This may be one way of ensuring that I maintain my card index system up to date, and also with the current temperatures beginning to climb rapidly to the point were working out in the sun is not an option be a method of keeping in touch with the garden and the plants. That's the theory, who knows if it will work in practice, only time will tell.
Number 1 in my card index is; Abutilon x hybridum. Apparently this plant is such a mongrel mix of several other abutilon species that its actual parentage is unknown. Our plant has proven slow to establish and mature and is still relatively small even though we have had it for several years. It is growing in a shaded area. This year it is beginning to produce more flowers than previous years, perhaps due to the abundant rain we experienced last winter.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

Hilary

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Re: A to Z of plants continuation
« Reply #6 on: May 19, 2019, 10:41:03 AM »
Great,
I will look forward to seeing all the named plants
MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

Umbrian

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Re: A to Z of plants continuation
« Reply #7 on: May 19, 2019, 03:23:47 PM »
Looking forward to your posts on this too.
Whilst on the subject of Abutilon I have been amazed by the performance of my Abutilon megapotamicum. When we moved house I brought it with me as I had had it in a pot being unsure of its hardiness. Not knowing where to place it, as space is much more limited now , I repotted it into a large stone trough that stands outside the wall bounding our small front garden. This is a cold spot and receives no direct sunshine at any time. Amazingly the Abutilon has not only survived but has grown steadily and is already back in flower.
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.

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John J

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Re: A to Z of plants continuation
« Reply #8 on: May 19, 2019, 05:48:36 PM »
Encouraged by the positive responses, thank you, I'll post the next one this evening as tomorrow I may be busy.
Acanthus arboreus an unusual, red-flowered acanthus from Africa. Ours was obtained from Sparoza in 2012. Unlike many acanthus it does not disappear in the summer but continues to grow, and grow, as is implied by the species name, arboreus (tree-like). Knowing this we gave ours plenty of space but over the 7 years it has filled it and now really needs to be pruned back. I am contemplating trying to borrow a suit of armour from the local medieval museum in order to do this as this is one VICIOUS plant!
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

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John J

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Re: A to Z of plants continuation
« Reply #9 on: May 20, 2019, 07:45:14 AM »
Found time to add our second acanthus, Acanthus mollis. Mollis meaning soft, pliant, the exact opposite of the previous plant.
Well known as the symbol of the MGS, and the pattern for the capitals of the Corinthian columns.
Native to SW Europe and NW Africa it has become a popular garden plant, needing little or no attention apart form tidying up once its growing season ends.
Easily grown from even the smallest root cutting, so much so that it can become invasive.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

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John J

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Re: A to Z of plants continuation
« Reply #10 on: May 21, 2019, 03:27:13 PM »
Acca sellowiana, Pineapple guava. Our plants were grown from seeds obtained from Chiltern Seeds in UK at least 20 years ago.
Beautiful flowers that have edible petals and plum-sized fruit that need a spell of cold to ripen fully, something that they do not get here in our garden.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

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John J

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Re: A to Z of plants continuation
« Reply #11 on: May 22, 2019, 07:19:32 AM »
Our Aeonium arboreum atropurpureum is situated at the side of our entrance driveway and is in full sun for most of the day. It produces large, conical spires of small yellow flowers in winter, that have by now gone over. It is less attractive in summer when the rosettes of leaves close up as a protective measure against the intense heat.
Last December we acquired a cutting of 'Zwartkop' that appears to be settling but we'll see how it survives the summer.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

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John J

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Re: A to Z of plants continuation
« Reply #12 on: May 23, 2019, 06:36:16 AM »
Bulbs are very useful in mediterranean gardens, adding colour and interest. Our Agapanthus africanus are just beginning to play their part.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

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Alisdair

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Re: A to Z of plants continuation
« Reply #13 on: May 23, 2019, 12:40:47 PM »
John, presumably that really is Agapanthus africanus? (I know you're a stickler for names!) I grow it too, seeds originally from our SA member Barbara Knox-Shaw. As I expect you know, most of the "A. africanus" and "its" hybrids/cultivars are really the somewhat different - and easier to grow - A. praecox. See this SANBI note.
Alisdair Aird
Gardens in SE England (Sussex); also coastal Southern Greece, and (in a very small way) South West France; MGS member (and former president); vice chairman RHS Lily Group, past chairman Cyclamen Society

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John J

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Re: A to Z of plants continuation
« Reply #14 on: May 23, 2019, 01:10:04 PM »
Alisdair, you could very well be right. Not being able to provide a definitive answer I stuck with the name given by the supplier, who is slightly more reliable than most we encounter, I have to say. I guess the best I can say is the jury is still out regarding its true identity.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)