Viola (including pansies)

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ezeiza

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Re: Viola (including pansies)
« Reply #15 on: November 07, 2011, 03:25:56 AM »
John, it can withstand practically every condition and with suitable watering makes a thick flat groundcover.

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MikeHardman

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Re: Viola (including pansies)
« Reply #16 on: November 07, 2011, 07:32:38 AM »
V. hederacea, like many viola, is susceptible to spider mite (Tetranychus spp.). If the plant is grown in dryer conditions than it prefers, the spider mites can really get a hold, and if not killed-off, you can be left with just two options: burning the top growth off or digging-up and destroying the plants.
Mike
Geologist by Uni training, IT consultant, Referee for Viola for Botanical Society of the British Isles, commissioned author and photographer on Viola for RHS (Enc. of Perennials, The Garden, The Plantsman).
I garden near Polis, Cyprus, 100m alt., on marl, but have gardened mainly in S.England

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John

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Re: Viola (including pansies)
« Reply #17 on: January 10, 2012, 11:19:10 AM »
Hi Mike, just came across this when I realised there is what I presume to be a tiny annual Viola in the bottom left hand corner of the main pic of a geranium, probably G. tuberosum? Cropped close up of Viola sp. second pic. This was on the trip to SW Turkey in April 2010. This site was near Termessos.
John
Horticulturist, photographer, author, garden designer and plant breeder; MGS member and RHS committee member. I garden at home in SW London and also at work in South London.

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MikeHardman

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Re: Viola (including pansies)
« Reply #18 on: January 10, 2012, 11:59:48 AM »
Probably Viola kitaibeliana, John.
Mike
Geologist by Uni training, IT consultant, Referee for Viola for Botanical Society of the British Isles, commissioned author and photographer on Viola for RHS (Enc. of Perennials, The Garden, The Plantsman).
I garden near Polis, Cyprus, 100m alt., on marl, but have gardened mainly in S.England

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Alisdair

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Re: Viola (including pansies)
« Reply #19 on: July 04, 2012, 11:49:19 AM »
For forum photos of some other Viola species, click on their names below:
Viola heldreichii
Viola reichenbachiana
Viola tricolor ssp. macedonica
Alisdair Aird
Gardens in SE England (Sussex); also coastal Southern Greece, and (in a very small way) South West France; MGS member (and former president); vice chairman RHS Lily Group, past chairman Cyclamen Society

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John

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Re: Viola (including pansies)
« Reply #20 on: July 04, 2012, 03:36:23 PM »
Might as well ask Mike about this one. Taken in the Tara Canyon, Montenegro in May. Growing in beech forest.
Sorry it was the only shot I took and in a hurry so no close up.
John
Horticulturist, photographer, author, garden designer and plant breeder; MGS member and RHS committee member. I garden at home in SW London and also at work in South London.

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John

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Re: Viola (including pansies)
« Reply #21 on: July 04, 2012, 03:38:54 PM »
Might as well put this one in too. Taken in May on Montseny a mountain to the north of Barcelona. This is on the north side and again in beech forest growing alongside Ramonda which unfortunately wasn't in flower.
John
Horticulturist, photographer, author, garden designer and plant breeder; MGS member and RHS committee member. I garden at home in SW London and also at work in South London.

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John

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Re: Viola (including pansies)
« Reply #22 on: July 04, 2012, 03:42:24 PM »
This one was very nice and growing at its best where juniper had been burnt off as here in the alpine meadows around Mount Kom in Montenegro again in May. This one was identified as V. elegantula. Do you agree Mike?
John
Horticulturist, photographer, author, garden designer and plant breeder; MGS member and RHS committee member. I garden at home in SW London and also at work in South London.

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John

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Re: Viola (including pansies)
« Reply #23 on: July 04, 2012, 03:46:49 PM »
And another one from Montseny, north of Barcelona. This one I was told is V. bubanii. Mike do you agree?
John
Horticulturist, photographer, author, garden designer and plant breeder; MGS member and RHS committee member. I garden at home in SW London and also at work in South London.

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MikeHardman

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Re: Viola (including pansies)
« Reply #24 on: July 04, 2012, 08:23:19 PM »
Hmm - has the general character of V. reichenbachiana, but:
- it is too late in the year
- the spur is too long (though the right colour)
- the sepal appendages are too big (as far as I can tell)
I'll have to ponder some more...

Might as well ask Mike about this one. Taken in the Tara Canyon, Montenegro in May. Growing in beech forest.
Sorry it was the only shot I took and in a hurry so no close up.

Belated update on other photo (your post of 04 July 2012, 14:46:49):
Yes, I agree - V. bubanii.

And the ones in beech woods:
Both V. reichenbachiana (perhaps spring comes late to those mountains)
For Viola in Spain/Portugal - refer to the section on Viola in Flora Iberica - http://www.floraiberica.es/floraiberica/texto/pdfs/03_065_01_Viola.pdf
« Last Edit: December 11, 2012, 08:34:48 AM by MikeHardman »
Mike
Geologist by Uni training, IT consultant, Referee for Viola for Botanical Society of the British Isles, commissioned author and photographer on Viola for RHS (Enc. of Perennials, The Garden, The Plantsman).
I garden near Polis, Cyprus, 100m alt., on marl, but have gardened mainly in S.England

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MikeHardman

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Re: Viola (including pansies)
« Reply #25 on: July 04, 2012, 08:28:30 PM »
Very nice John.
Yes, it could be V. elegantula. Any scent?
I used to grow V. e. ssp. bosniaca (pink), which had a very nice scent.
I'll see if I can check it out more carefully meanwhile.

This one was very nice and growing at its best where juniper had been burnt off as here in the alpine meadows around Mount Kom in Montenegro again in May. This one was identified as V. elegantula. Do you agree Mike?
Mike
Geologist by Uni training, IT consultant, Referee for Viola for Botanical Society of the British Isles, commissioned author and photographer on Viola for RHS (Enc. of Perennials, The Garden, The Plantsman).
I garden near Polis, Cyprus, 100m alt., on marl, but have gardened mainly in S.England

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John

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Re: Viola (including pansies)
« Reply #26 on: July 15, 2012, 12:21:19 AM »
In reply I have to say I didn't check for scent, too windy and not enough time!
Just realised there was this other one in Montenegro which would have been under snow for the winter. Taken in the National Park Lovcen. At least thats what I wrote down.
John
Horticulturist, photographer, author, garden designer and plant breeder; MGS member and RHS committee member. I garden at home in SW London and also at work in South London.

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MikeHardman

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Re: Viola (including pansies)
« Reply #27 on: July 17, 2012, 08:41:03 AM »
interim reply: working on it..., lots of stuff on my plate just now...
Mike
Geologist by Uni training, IT consultant, Referee for Viola for Botanical Society of the British Isles, commissioned author and photographer on Viola for RHS (Enc. of Perennials, The Garden, The Plantsman).
I garden near Polis, Cyprus, 100m alt., on marl, but have gardened mainly in S.England

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John

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Re: Viola (including pansies)
« Reply #28 on: July 19, 2012, 04:07:45 PM »
No rush and as much as interest for you!
John
Horticulturist, photographer, author, garden designer and plant breeder; MGS member and RHS committee member. I garden at home in SW London and also at work in South London.

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John

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Re: Viola (including pansies)
« Reply #29 on: July 19, 2012, 06:42:35 PM »
Of further Viola interest. I was judging at the RHS Tatton show 2 days ago and though not a stand I judged here's one of a nursery called Victorian Violas. These are cultivars which still have the look and habit of wild violas very much like the ones we have been seeing around the northern Mediterranean mountains and indeed much of their ancestry came from these wild species.
John
Horticulturist, photographer, author, garden designer and plant breeder; MGS member and RHS committee member. I garden at home in SW London and also at work in South London.